Hot answers tagged

48

You will be fine. The food was cooked... Just clean the "house" scissors with soap and hot water and dry them so that there is no rust.


43

First, 145 °F (63 °C) and higher is the temperature for a well done steak. So, with the addition of carry-over cooking, your results don't surprise me. If you are shooting for rare, cook to an internal temperature of 125 °F (52 °C), and let your steak rest 10 minutes before slicing. While the USDA correctly and necessarily provides temperature guidelines, ...


18

The concern for non-food scissors is generally not bacteria, particularly as you cooked it immediately after cooking, assuming you cooked it thoroughly. The only real health concern would be what else you might have on the scissors. You might use non-food scissors to cut things that contain toxic chemicals, for example, or something else that could leech ...


8

One answer I didn't see above: (Edit: Well, it was there. Guess I missed it. Leaving this to cover details that were omitted) Cooking for safety is a function of temperature and TIME. For example, the USDA recommends 165° for chicken. But, that's an instantaneous temperature read. It's perfectly safe to eat chicken that was cooked to lower temperatures, held ...


7

Three recommendations: If you pat the meat with a paper towel, it will absorb some of the moisture without removing salt or other seasoning. You need very little oil (if any) in the pan to fry a steak, since fat will melt out of the steak. Use less oil, or put the oil onto the steak rather than in the pan. Then there will be much less oil to spatter. Use a ...


6

Bacterial (and other) infections are much more probabilistic than you appear to consider them. A few basic facts: All pathogenic bacteria (and other pathogens) have a minimal infective dose, i.e., the minimal number of bacteria required to enter your body in order to start an infection. Fewer bacteria will not be able to cause an infection as your immune ...


6

The color of beef and other meats is actually a pretty big topic. It is influenced by the animal's diet, the particular breed, how much the muscle was worked, how much the meat has been exposed to oxygen, and how fresh it is. The USDA and other agencies put out articles about it, and it's widely debated which is "better". There are some stores that will ...


6

The USDA recommends cooking many meats many That is your problem right there. This USDA guideline is one that, if followed, makes almost all meat safe to eat. Meaning that it caters to the lowest common denominator, the cheapest meat out there. It's like recommending a complete Hazmat suit with oxygen bottle for anyone working with any chemicals. Yes, ...


5

Are there things I do or should do to ensure safe raw meat (e.g. sourcing, preservation, preparation, cooking)? Raw beef from a healthy cow is sterile, so most of the pathogens you could poison yourself with develop on the surface. With that knowledge: Smell the meat you're going to eat raw. Spoilage on the surface typically starts with "sour" ...


4

I've seen reference to 1/2 tsp kosher salt per pound. For a steak, I'll do a few hours at most, but more often salt right before cooking. For a roast chicken, I salt and leave uncovered in fridge for up to two days. For the steak, salting far in advance leads to a more "cured" texture that I don't enjoy. For the bird, salting in advance gives ...


3

A few things that might help avoid splattering: Let the steak come up to room temperature before patting dry and seasoning. This avoids extra condensation forming. When laying the steak in the pan, lay it "away from you". I.e., hold the steak at one end, lower the other end into the pan on the side nearest to you, then 'roll' the steak until the end you are ...


2

You don't have to have stock or wine, meat becomes tender with slow cooking in the presence of water as the water helps to break down the connective tissue that makes meat tough. Stock or wine is just water with flavor, but you can add flavor in any number of ways through spices, herbs, vegetables and other ingredients. You can slow cook in the oven or on a ...


2

water, seasonings, aromatics vegetables (carrots, celery, onions garlic... ), tomato paste and/or canned tomatoes Brown the meat in oil in a dutch oven type pan, remove and set aside. Brown the vegetables in oil, when good you have coloring (not burning), add tomato paste, mix and cook well for a few minutes. Add meat back to the pot, add water and canned ...


2

You can certainly get good steak without sous vide, both in color and taste. The quality of the meat matters, but is not the only variable. You should get the proper cut, and while the cow diet is not necessary for a red color, if it was slaughtered too young, the meat will be lighter in color. Not grey though, just a less saturated pink-red. And make sure ...


1

I confirm, I regularly grill lamb chops in a pan (or even better, on a barbecue) and it is delicious! Of course it won't be as soft as a piece of meat that you slow-cooked for hours, but it is not hard either. It should be cooked quickly, 3-4 minuts on each side, I imagine that it will get hard if you overcook them. You can indeed also marinate them before, ...


1

The only reasonable thing to do if you must do both separately is to start with a nice long brine and finish with a relatively short marinade. If you start with the marinade, you run too much risk of any lingering acid/enzyme destroying the proteins during the long brine that follows. There's also the chance that any flavor imparted by the marinade would end ...


1

Going to a butcher is a very good idea, and doing some of your own butchering on larger cuts is a great way to save money and get really good quality meat. It's not a question of butcher versus supermarket though, the factors that make a difference in cooking time are: Cut: The word steak is a generic term for a small cut of meat cut across the muscle ...


1

If a cure has the effect of too aggressively salting the meat then you can consider making a softer cure. You make a cure softer by adding a certain amount of sugar too it, but to be honest if your meat has too harsh a taste of salt it probably means you cured it for too long. Generally time is the thing you need to control. For an immersive cure you need ...


1

I think it's a simple as bad heat transfer often meaning uneven heat transfer, leading to burning. Burnt fond won't deglaze successfully. Compare deglazing with making a roux: in both cases you want the proteins and starches to be browned (by the Malliard reaction and caramelization) but not burnt. When making fond you want relatively high heat to promote ...


1

Based on your explanation I can only speculate a bit. I have ordered beef and other meats including yak (which is from a bovine) online from various places. I prefer grass fed and free range beef and also eat some game meats (venison, rabbit, ostrich, boar, etc) so am familiar with some variety of meats besides the farm raised packaged meat in most grocery ...


1

As already noted, the "red"/"not red" distinction in and of itself isn't very useful, because high quality beef that has not been exposed to air will be "not red", while old, going-bad beef will also be "not red", as will properly dry-aged beef. Without a lexicon of more fine-grained descriptions of color and other characteristics of appearance, it's not ...


1

First of all, flank steaks are not a good steak to get a good crust on. You would want to use something thicker like a sirloin and a rib eye cap. Second of all, never ever cover your steak with tin foil, that will cause the steak to overcook cause of the steam and you’ll lose your crust because it will get steamed off. Third of all, try using a cast iron pan ...


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