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These could be proteins precipitated from the meat and denatured resulting in coagulation on the surface of your grill by the heat of cooking. These come out of the juices that run when cooking meat. Denatured proteins are generally insoluble, and are fairly difficult to remove (think cooked egg when it sticks to a surface). The insolubility accounts for ...


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Not sure anyone would be able to tell you definitively, but, if you add water after each use, my guess would be minerals from your water.


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Neither of those sounds like a big problem. You say that you get your pan "really hot". It's nice to use an infrared thermometer to check how hot, but at the very least, you should check for the Leidenfrost effect: if you put a drop of water on the pan, it should skitter around without visibly boiling, and take several seconds to actually evaporate. That ...


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