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I've never used the UMAi bags because I was confident I could reproduce dry-aging conditions at home. Everything I read about the bags convinced me not to use them. I have successfully dry aged beef in a spare refrigerator. The temperature was set to maintain 35 to 40 F (2 - 5C). I also placed a small (5 inch) fan inside to keep the air circulating. I ...


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I've cut roasting joints into steaklets before, one time it was all they had and another it was on special offer. Took a thick bit for me (I like it rare in the middle) and thinner slices for the others who like it well done. Was OK. As others have said, cut across the grain. If you can't tell by looking it's usually less stretchy in the grain direction.


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TL;DR: Yes, it's fine to cut meats before cooking. Another option to pan cooking You might consider using a sous vide cooker (or water bath with a good thermometer) to thoroughly cook the meat before searing. This works by keeping the meat just below the temperature that makes the proteins bind up and squeeze out liquids (see below). The result is meat that ...


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Why would it not be acceptable to cut raw meat? It was already cut from another larger piece of meat that was cut from a whole animal. Nothing terrible will happen. A steak is not a bag of juices, nothing significant will leak off of it. It's indeed better to cut in a smaller piece that fits your pan, the whole steak should touch the bottom of the pan ...


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Giving your steak a hard sear in a ripping hot cast iron pan (which usually is heavy enough to hold a lot of heat) probably takes a minute or two on each side. I personally find that throwing steak directly from the fridge into the pan, seasoning before I put it in the pan, will give me a sear no problem, but the interior won't have time to come up to the ...


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Searing frozen meat is fine, and is a useful way to get a good sear without overcooking the inside (since you can sear for longer, and at a lower temperature). There are no food safety issues I can think of which would apply to short ribs but not steaks, particularly since the former are cooked for longer at a higher internal temperature. The only problem I ...


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