64

That really wouldn't work. With steaming the water is heated to boiling which creates steam. Since the food is colder, the steam condenses on the food which transfers heat to the food. With hot oil there is no boiling and vapor of the oil. So in an enclosed container it would be more akin to baking, the hot oil heating the air, than steaming. (There would ...


41

Yes, if you have the right pot, namely one that has a steamer insert that is well above the bottom of the pot, or even stacks. In fact, in several cuisines this is the standard way of getting several ingredients ready at once. For example, it's common to steam couscous in the steam from the Moroccan stew cooking below, using a stacking pot called a ...


33

I have never heard of anyone "steaming" vegetables using oil instead of water. Placing them in a metal frame above hot oil would not be as effective as cooking them surrounded by steam (from water). The hot oil would need to be boiling. According to https://www.researchgate.net/post/What_is_the_boiling_temperature_of_cooking_oil_palm_oil_Any_reference Q &...


29

These egg cookers work by simply heating the water until it all evaporates. Most cookers sense when all the water is evaporated, and automatically turn off and/or alerting with a beep or noise. They have a sensor under the hot plate that detects temperature. When water is still in the pan, it keeps the pan cool, and when water evaporates completely the pan ...


26

I think you are being too conservative. The oven door and glass in there is built to handle some temperature differences. When someone opens an oven door and sets a room temperature pan or cooking container on it while moving racks or other food around, I can't think it would be THAT different that water splashing around. If this were an issue, we'd ...


25

Most likely yes, it has stuff besides water. Although I wouldn't lay my hand in the fire that it has it every single time. The first scenario is the bubbling from starchy water, as Chris H already explained. This is not ruled out by "the assumption that the food has not made contact with the lid", since here it is the cooking water that makes ...


21

Make bread with it (let it cool enough that you don't kill the yeast, first.) Make soup with it.


21

Starchy foods, like rice, tend to bubble and splash. They will get starch on the inside of the lid. If you don't let it dry out, you might decide a quick rinse is sufficient, but if it dries it will probably need a proper wash to remove the starch. Steaming is more interesting. There shouldn't be any splashing above the level of the food, so it should ...


20

I've read that if you can't or don't use it for your own consumption, that houseplants really love it (after it's cooled, of course).


13

I‘m sure you could do this. But the gain may be less than you calculate and the results will not be exactly the same: If you are (pre-)steaming the vegetables, your are keeping their individual flavor whereas by cooking in the curry sauce you get a more evened out flavor as the various ingredients contribute to the overall flavor and absorb the spices. ...


12

As already said, this wouldn't work at all with any normal fat. I'd further emphasize that it's really quite dangerous: fat can spontaneously ignite when heated substantially over the smoke point. And if you drop anything water-containing (like one of the pieces of vegetable) into hot fat, the water will boil with a sudden violent expansion. When the fat is ...


10

I like to follow Alton Brown's approach: steam for 12 minutes, drop into ice bath. Always turns out perfectly for me this way (and as a bonus, they're much easier to peel than boiled eggs). Here's the video from Alton's show, with some extra information in it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUHKpHek2E8 And while unrelated (since you want to steam them), if ...


10

No, there is nothing about raising otherwise-safe milk rapidly to a high temperature that is going to make you sick. Unless you are already lactose intolerant or otherwise allergic to milk. Raising milk rapidly to a temperature above the danger zone (140 F / 60 C) is going to make it safer, not less safe.


10

Before steaming the clams, they should all be closed. If any of your clams are open, give them a tap and if they stay open, then it is bad and you should take it out of your batch to prevent it from ruining the other clams. After you have steamed the clams, most of them should be open. The few clams that stay closed doesn't necessarily mean they are bad. ...


9

Yes, you can. And it is not too easy. Microfoam has small bubbles by definition and the panarello wand will draw a 'certain' amount of air and you can't really control that part. The notes below might help you get there. I have successfully done this with the panarello wands of automatic Saeco machines which aren't too different from deLonghi. Run your ...


9

I usually add some other veggies "disposable parts" to that water before boiling, so i make a vegetabel stock, and then use it to make risotto


9

Foaming is the result of proteins. For example, urine (sorry) foams when protein levels are high (persons with kidney failure can judge their urinary protein levels by how much foaming occurs). Vegetables have no protein; shrimp juices, plenty. Fats counteract protein foam formation, so egg whites ( very high protein) foam nicely, but not if any yolk or ...


8

TL;DR The Instant Pot is primarily a pressure cooker and its "steam" function is for pressure steaming. I guess typically you do raw/frozen veggies and seafood with this function. You can do normal steaming in "sauté" mode with a vented glass lid (sold as an optional accessory, or if you have a vented lid that fits). Why? Is it the case that the "steam" ...


8

To set expectations here, you aren't going to infuse flavors into the middle of steamed vegetables and fungi, you may get some flavor penetration on the outside, but the best bet for flavored vegetables is to coat the outside with the flavor. When you put flavorings into water for steaming food most of the flavor stays in the water rather than getting onto ...


7

As far as a I know, the lid is not really necessary for this style of dumpling at all. The only affect it will have is to increase the level of steaminess above the waterline, and very slightly prevent the dumplings from drying out. That is rarely a problem, especially if you flip the dumplings half-way through cooking. Your not quite big enough lid ...


7

The only difference between a bamboo steamer and a metal/plastic steamer is that a bamboo steamer will absorb (some of the) moisture from the steam, rather than allowing it to recondense and drop into the food. It's possible that recondensed moisture could take a small amount of water-soluble nutrients with it, but between the limited ability of bamboo to ...


7

It's possible that your water supply could be high in iron, either from a well, or older city pipes. When you steam spinach, some of the iron in the spinach leeches out with the circulating steam, and this may be enough to turn normally clear high iron water into disturbing looking muddy water. If this is the case, the water is safe, it's just not that ...


7

Your wife probably thinks "It's just water and thoroughly boiled, so all is well.". Unfortunately, it is not. If you look into your pot after the first use, you'll notice that the water contains traces of the vegetable, meaning it technically falls under the "food that becomes unsafe after 2/4 hours at 40-140 °F (4-60 °C)" category and should be ...


7

As with many dishes of this type, there are as many ways to cook it as there are cooks - but overall I think you have three things combining to make your rice mushy. You are over-cooking your rice at the start. Your burner temperature is too high Your simmer time is too short. Basically you're driving off water but not at a pace the rice can settle to ...


7

I'd say yes, but.... Yes, but the steaming food may release a lot of colors and flavors into the water below, so be aware of this. I for one, would love broccoli rice, or beet potatoes, but not everyone might.


6

20 minutes is perfect. I brought a large egg to room temperature and steamed it over gently boiling water in a tightly covered pot. After exactly 20 minutes I plunged it into ice water, waited one minute, then peeled. It was as perfectly "hard boiled" as I've ever seen or tasted. For what it's worth, I'm at sea level. It makes me want to do deviled eggs! I ...


6

In cooking rice or many other grains (and even some grain based products such as pasta), two things actually happen: The starches absorb water; they are hydrated. Cooking. The boiling phase does both at the same time, very efficiently, but sufficient hydration happens before the rice is fully cooked through. So steaming to finish allows the rice to be ...


6

Note: I am assuming this glass is kitchenware, like mixing bowls or measuring cups, not service ware like drinking glasses or teacups. Glass melts at about 1500 F / 800 C. There is no danger of melting the glass in any type of steamer, or realistically with any equipment you may have at home. The real issue is thermal shock: very rapidly cooling glass ...


6

further to SAJ14SAJ's answer, what happens is the Magnesium atom in the bright green Chlorophyll is lost in acidic conditions and you end up with Pheophytin which is Olive Green. There are other reactions at play mediated by the enzyme Chlorophyllase which can be active even in frozen storage. The main reason for blanching (hot water part) is to stop this ...


6

Per the transcript of Alton Brown's Good Eat's episode If It Ain't Broccoli, Don't Fix It: Inside broccoli, nice, bright green chlorophylls are kept separate from acidic elements by cell walls. But if you overcook the broccoli, the cell walls can collapse, and the acids can attack, turning our nice, bright green chlorophylls into a sad, dingy gray. ...


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