15

The following excerpt answers questions 1 and 2. Additionally it reduces the cooking time for the parboiled rice. Also known as converted rice, parboiled rice has been pressure-steamed and then dried in its natural outer husk (which is later removed). This process hardens the starch in the grains so they remain firmer, less sticky, and separate when ...


11

Other things you can try: add a tablespoon more water at the start reduce the cook-time by 2 minutes let the rice sit for a minute or two with the lid on, sort of "steaming in its own juices" The idea is that if the rice is just a bit damp, it won't stick.


11

I find that a silicone spatula is frequently better at getting the pan clean than a stiff spatula like a wooden one. If your rice is slightly burnt into the bottom, you might have to use both - scratch it off with the wooden spatula, then collect with the silicone one.


10

I assume you're making normal maki (nori side out) and not California rolls. Are you leaving a 1/2 inch or so of blank nori (no rice) on the outside edge (the edge that you roll last)? If you slightly wet the bare edge of the nori with a little water on your finger it should help it stick together.


9

Looks like Vietnamese Honeycomb Cake made with pandan and tapioca: http://danangcuisine.com/recipes/recipe-28-banh-bo-nuong-vietnamese-honeycomb-cake/


8

This lady is pleased with the results just using her one-setting cooker: Sticky Rice. Note, she says in the comments that she uses 2 cups (or slightly less) water to 1 cup of rice (which makes sense) not 3 cups rice to 2 cups water like it sounds like she is saying in the video. She rinses the rice well, but does not soak it. EDIT: With things like this ...


7

I always dip my sushi in a little bit of soy sauce/rice vinegar mix - or, depending on the sushi, a bit of sesame oil and salt - but I had the same problem as you where the rolls were opening up. I started making a smaller amount of whatever my chosen dipping sauce was and putting a thin film of it on the edge of the nori where they connected (think like ...


7

Try putting a spoon of fat (oil, butter, etc) in the beginning... it will melt and coat the rice/bottom of the pan. I used to always have some rice stuck to the bottom of my pan when I moved into my new home with gas stoves instead of electric. This trick works very well, and now my rice all comes out of the pan clean and easily.


5

At that point, I'm not sure there's anything you can really do, except maybe take the lid off & attempt to dry it out before it turns entirely to mush. For next time, the three simplest alternatives would be: Use less liquid [which may not be possible]. Add the rice later in the process. or my personal favourite... Cook the rice separately, in a ...


5

In my experience, rice can be cooked in any pot. I cook quite a lot of Japanese style dishes, and as far as I can tell the rice is cooked in the same way as any other. For myself, I've done it in good "induction-able" steel pots, as well as huge (navy galley) aluminium pots, and a couple of low-quality stainless steel things too. They're all fine. Normally,...


3

When making sticky-rice I use a rice cooker with a non-stick surface on the inner pot. This works tremendously effectively. If you are using a frying pan with a non-stick surface then my immediate reaction would be that the contact point heat is too high. My second reaction would be to make sure you were rinsing your rice before cooking it (this helps with ...


3

Black rice is "hulled", meaning the fibrous outer husk is removed, but not (or only minimally) "polished", meaning the thin but tough bran layer is left on. (It's the bran that provides the color to black rice.) Different varietals of rice, and different processing methods, will lead to a thicker or thinner layer of bran. It sounds like ...


3

I don't know what is done traditionally but have you seen this recipe? They use part white sticky rice as the black rice alone did not seem sticky enough. Mango with Black Sticky Rice | Khao Niew Dam Mamuang If you are interested there is also a way to make it more like a porridge that is uses more water and is cooked longer like congee in a pot and ...


3

The two most common causes of rolls falling apart are they are either overstuffed (too much filling) or the nori is too dry. dax's answer will work if the nori was a bit dry.


2

You can replicate a Thai rice steamer with a deep frying pan, a splatter guard, and a heatproof bowl. Just place a mound of soaked glutinous rice in the centre of the splatter guard over simmering water, then place the bowl on top, and steam for about 20-30 minutes, turning the mound over once or twice to ensure even cooking.


2

I haven't tried either but I found this, which seems helpful: "there is a big difference between the two..where i come from.(malaysia).we use rice flour to make banana fritters (deep fried in rice flour batter thus giving it a crispy crunchy batter) while glutinous rice flour will give a sticky texture..u cant deep fry the batter but its normally used to ...


2

Leave room on the edge & don’t over-stuff it. Mix a bit of rice wine vinegar with tamari sauce. I prefer Tamari sauce over regular soy sauce, it just tastes better. Take your finger and put a little of the sauce on the edge of the nori roll (that you left) to roll it up.


2

Traditional sushi rice ("meshi") is defined by both the stickiness of its rice but also its lack of gumminess. Each grain of rice is supposed to remain distinct. The final component of sushi-meshi is of course the application of vinegar, which is supposed to evenly coat the outside of every grain. Proper application of vinegar is not possible unless the ...


2

That looks like a steamed corn bun/bread coloured green. I think the corn flour has been mixed with tapioca starch giving it a sticky elastic texture. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wotou http://nasilemaklover.blogspot.com/2015/07/sweet-corn-mantou-steamed-buns.html


2

I am a Chinese. You said that you want to make Chinese fried rice. To cook fried rice in China, you need to use the steamed rice the day before. The steamed rice the day before is placed in the refrigerator. . And don’t put too much water when steaming the rice, so the rice is hard, the rice grains will not be damaged during the fried rice, and each grain is ...


2

No, it does not. I was pretty sure from the theory of it that it won't help. Acid makes cell walls harder, so you can use it e.g. when you are cooking potatoes. But in rice kernels, you have basically no cell walls to harden, everything is starch granules. So I saw no reason why it would work. Theory is nice, but not always enough for writing answers. There ...


2

Cook it in the microwave. It never sticks because the heat is applied evenly throughout. Place one cup of rice with one cup of boiling water in a glass bowl with a tablespoon of oil. Heat on full power for 6 minutes. Stir the rice, add another cup of boiling water and heat for another 6 minutes. Then fluff it up once finished. Once you cook it this way ...


1

I'm going to go contra to pretty much all the advice so far, but this is how I've been cooking rice for 25 years... Clear-lidded pans make this far less guesswork. Don't use a frying pan, use a heavy-bottomed saucepan with a tight-fitting lid, 3 times the volume of your finished rice. Don't rinse the rice, you don't need to. Use your coolest, most even ...


1

I guess it depends on what you expect from your rice, but my recipe is this: Heat up a pot with some (not too much) oil until the oil is quite hot. Put some volume of rice into it, and vigorously scrape/mix it with whatever large implement you have around (big spatula). Smell it a lot. At some point the rice will start to roast (ever so slightly), it may ...


1

Rice can be made in any pot, like Carmi said. The only thing I would add is that once the rice comes to a boil bring it down to simmer and leave the lid ajar so that it doesn't spill over. And then once the rice has absorbed most of the water you can close the lid and let it sit there on low heat.


1

I understand your frustration. I learned by trial and error but good rice is always worth a few fails. :) I've found that Rooster A.A.A. Scented Jasmine Rice is a sweet rice/sticky (glutinous) rice that works best when soaked in water (after cleaning the rice...so that I can soak it in the correct amount of water) at least 30 minutes before cooking and it ...


1

Do you mean an actual pool of water forms or the rice just does not get sticky like your other rice? Have you tried different amounts of water to cook it, either more or less? All rice is different, depending on the variety and where it's grown. You sometimes have to treat a new rice differently than the rice you're used to.


1

To answer your question: you can't... not really. Thai sticky rice is cooked by steam and not by boiling and then steam like normal rice. Simply cooking a glutinous rice using the standard method is no more Thai sticky rice than a spud that I've crushed under my foot is a mashed potato. The main difference is that glutinous rice has waxy starch and it ...


1

You don't need anything but a pot, lid, and spoon. The easiest way is to cheat and add some sugar, probably 1/4 cup for every cup of rice. First you wash the rice several times, stir it around and squish it a bit to get the external layer of starch off. Once the water comes out clear you don't need to wash it anymore. Next add water and the sugar, bring it ...


1

TJ Ellis you're right. It's fried or roasted salty mung beans. If you can't find it you can use the other kind of bean to add crispy topping.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible