44

Stir frying is a relatively quick cooking process. Different ingredients often have different cooking times. You add ingredients at different times so that the longer cooking ingredients will have time to cook and be ready at the same time as the shorter cooking ingredients. If you have ingredients with approximately the same cooking times, by all means, ...


38

The first thing is to do is thaw them properly before you cook them, half frozen vegetables will cool your pan too much. I often thaw frozen vegetables by soaking them in hot tap water, this is pretty quick and doesn't scorch them like microwaving them might. This might take a bit more time than microwaving but it's a much better result. You will never get ...


34

Your scallops are (beautifully) seared on the outside because they are cooked all the way through in a very hot pan. The scallops in the Chinese stir fries stay pale because most of their cooking is done at low heat. They are likely cooked twice: first they are velveted (meaning marinated and oil-blanched) and then very quickly stir fried to reheat. In more ...


30

The scallops in the first two photos were left on the pan, with no movement, to sear on one side before flipping. To achieve that caramelization takes a couple of minutes before turning. In fact, at that point, the scallop is mostly cooked. In the second two photos, the scallop is likely stir-fried in a wok; that is, it is in constant motion over high ...


23

Lining with foil works well with cooking methods like baking or broiling, where the food is not stirred or manipulated much, and so the foil can sit undisturbed. With stir frying, you are quite likely to break through the foil while doing the stirring, and have to clean up fully in any case. Also, you probably would not get as good a stir fry due the thin ...


16

If the recipes were truly interesting in 'releasing the flavors', they'd be sweating the onions, not sauteing them. Sauté is a higher-heat method that will cook the vegetables to create other chemical compounds, thus changing their flavor. In the case of garlic and onions, this cooking makes them dramatically sweeter. But sometimes you don't want that -- ...


13

You have a few options, as you're dealing with high-heat cooking Only fry the garlic for a few seconds before adding something else to cool down the pan. You don't want it to cook 'til it shows color ... just a few seconds then toss in some onion or other high-moisture items. Add the garlic with something else (eg, ginger), to keep it from burning quite as ...


11

There are a couple of reasons, traditional and some functional: The home cultures where these recipes are indigenous use a wok, so many recipe authors go the same way Woks are usually made out of carbon steel, and are poor conductors of heat. This means that the strongest heat from the concentrated heat source is in the center/bottom of the wok. As you go ...


11

I have never tried it but when I googled wok burners (thinking to find a standalone high-output gas hob), I found this article about a wok ring called the "WokMon" on Serious Eats and had to post it here: A couple months ago I was approached by Glen Lee, an inventor who claimed to have an ingenious new device for cooking in a wok at home. Seemed ...


9

It seems like you are primarily interested in reproducing the umami of the meat. Tofu does in fact have glutamic acids that will add to the umami; just make sure to thoroughly dry the tofu (extracting as much liquid as possible) before use. In addition, you can use minced mushrooms, as Stephie mentioned in the comments. You can also experiment with adding ...


8

Let's recapitulate the textural options you have: Crumbled firm tofu, sauteed (with or without some soy sauce and/or wheat paste - mind the color you want too!) Brunoised/minced fresh/reconstituted shiitake mushroom (potent taste, and you get a great stock from rehydrating :) ), sauteed. Brunoised/minced "perfectly normal, western mushroom" (Cremini, ...


8

Meat in stir-fries is often velveted. That makes for a supremely soft chunk of meat, and it can be done with any type of meat. This answer actually addresses chicken: How to cook extremely soft chicken?, but it applies just as well to beef. It's usually done with egg and cornstarch, but sometimes it's done with a small amount baking soda instead, as in this ...


8

We do cook over 100C in a pressure cooker, but not enough to brown food, as this would take very high pressures. It probably wouldn't be safe or economical at home, and doesn't have enough of an advantage over ovens (which may use steam) for it to be worth doing industrially. Solubility is a big factor, for example salt dissolves in water but not oil, and ...


7

The trick is to not use a wok at all. A wok works by concentrating a lot of heat on the bottom, more heat than you can achieve with a home stove. "Stir frying" moves the food from the cool sides of the wok, through the intense heat at the bottom, then out. Rather, use a wide skillet. A home stove can't generate the intense, focused heat of a restaurant ...


6

When any meat is sliced thinly you know it is done when it is seared on the outside, that's really it. The 6 minutes in the recipe sounds like too long to me depending on how thinly you've sliced your lamb, I'd halve the time myself. 30 seconds with the lamb, then add the garlic, stir fry for 1 minute and thirty seconds, then add the herbs until wilted, then ...


6

That is really a matter of choice. If you cook the veggies for a while, they will also release their aromatics.... but they taste different. Especially if using onions. and especially if you sautee long enough to brown. Not browning bones and veggies gives a light boullion, browning them a brown bouillon. To give you an example: Marcella Hazan gives in her ...


6

You cut off a little too much of the phrase; it's "add sauce and stir to cover and warm." You're stirring to cover the other ingredients with the sauce, and to warm the sauce.


6

I admit that I've spent too much time in Panda Express... but you can see their kitchens from the line and how they batch their food - often switching from a main dish to fried rice (with egg) and back to a stir fry and the solution they use is to quickly rinse out the wok with warm water and scrub it lightly with a brush before dumping it and reheating the ...


6

Olestra is used to fry 'light' potato chips. It's not a fat, and is indigestible. It can cause cramping and other unfortunate effects. Looks like it's hard to buy online too. Using a high boiling silicone based liquid would likely have the same effects, if it didn't flat out poison you.


6

To best check temperature, you need a thermometer, and if you can, use a non-contact thermometer (infrared thermometer). Teflon start degrading at around 260 °C (500 °F). So check the pan temperature, adjust the heat of your range (electric, gas...) so that the temperature stay below that. If you want to use high temperature for some applications, then ...


5

Stainless steel woks burn and stick very easily and are expensive and can't really be seasoned however they last forever. They are only used for foods that would attack a normal carbon steel wok and give the food a metallic taste, e.g. acidic foods. Carbon steel woks are used by Chinese chefs and after proper seasoning they are like non stick but able to ...


5

I wouldn't do it, for a few reasons : Cooking over extreme heat can damage the finish of enameled cast iron. It will typically cause discoloration if you have a white interior, and it may cause crazing (fine lines all over the place). It can also soften the enamel enough to fuse he pan to the stove. The high sides of a dutch oven hold in steam, which ...


5

Yes, there's smoke coming off the oil, but it's not heavy, black smoke. If you're frying things, when I see that, it's a sign to either get the pan off the heat, or to get food into the pan to cool it down. When you're stir-frying, you want very high heat, so you're often working right at the smoke point. Whereas, for sautéing, I always learned to put the ...


5

You were probably having a dish with green onion oil, something I'd also recommend as a solution to the smell/taste you're looking for. It remains aromatic for a couple weeks after you make a batch and bottle it. I make one with darker brown onions like this, which allows me to store it even longer.


5

Cook the meat in batches, 2, 3 batches so that the pan will stay at an appropriate temperature. When you add too much ingredients, meat, vegetables..., in a pan, the temperature will drop and instead of pan frying you will be pan boiling. I would do the following : Cut and marinate the meat. Cut all your vegetables. Portion the meat to have 2, 3 batches (or ...


5

Is there a rubric for what ingredients go into a Chinese stir fry? Usually, some optional mixture of liquids, vegetables, noodles, fruits, and meats. A bit of a facetious answer, but really- stir frying is just a method of cooking food. While there are certain ingredients that we usually associate with stir frying, the existence of a 'mother stir fry recipe'...


4

Thai soups (Tom Kha, Tom Yum etc) are an interesting counterexample - where shallots, peppers, onions ... are just thrown in the broth in many recipes. Moreover, there are lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves and other more specialised aromatics that are almost never sauteed in these, even if the same ARE sauteed (as part of a curry paste) in other ...


4

You can certainly add rice to the slow cooker--but it will end up more like a rice stew, rather than a stir fry ("slow-cooked stir fry" is also an oxy-moron--the recipe that you link to is in fact a vegetable and meat stew with a vaguely asian flavor profile and has nothing whatsoever to do with a stir-fry). However, the rice you cook in the slow-cooker for ...


4

If you don't feel like waiting for them to thaw, you can submerge the bag in hot water like @GdD mentioned. I prefer steaming frozen vegetables however. The trick is properly steaming them though. I love using the frozen steamables, I just pop them in the microwave for the set time and they're always cooked perfectly. But if the bag of frozen veggies isn'...


3

In addition to @Jolenealaska's answer the beef is cut across the grain, and very thin. It also helps to start with a tender cut like sirloin or rib.


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