Hot answers tagged

36

Airtight packaging doesn't slow down bacteria growth. There are a few myths about them which don't apply in practice: Bacteria are not kept out, despite popular belief – the air within the container has as many bacteria as the air outside. The food in the container also has bacteria – cooking doesn't sterilize food! – so you cannot keep the bacteria out ...


32

I wouldn't recommend it for a couple of reasons: Food in general degrades much faster in the fridge than in the freezer, so you risk spoilage during that time. Most prepared foods are not recommended to be stored that long in the fridge. Most "do not thaw" meals are designed to be cooked from frozen. So you're not only left guessing what the ...


21

Basically, pasteurization is a process that kills most bacteria. Sous vide is a method that you can use to pasteurize food (eggs for example) which will kill most, but not all, bacteria. Sterilization is a method of killing all bacteria (e.g. by irradiation or heat). Sterilization would be what you'd want to use for canning, for example. Milk is ...


21

Although yes, pasteurization is not as complete as sterilization, there's one subtle difference that's not been mentioned in the other answers: pasteurization is always a heat treatment done to something that can spoil. Sterilization, on the other hand, can be done on things that can't spoil, such containers, utensils, or preparation surfaces (cutting ...


14

In addition to keeping odors contained and limiting the possibility of cross-contamination, oxygen degrades the quality of food. Oxygen also supports aerobic spoilage organisms. So, limiting air keeps your food fresher longer. Sealing up your food also limits dehydration. These containers are beneficial for both quality and safety.


11

The terms freezer and deep freeze are synonymous. There is no such term as "deep fridge" in British or US English, though apparently there is in Indian English… where if you search what you find are chest freezers. This means, whatever your terminology, a 'freezer', 'deep freeze' or 'deep fridge' is not the same as an ordinary ice box inside a ...


11

In a word, humidity. Instant coffee absorbs moisture from air rather well. I suspect that your container isn't perfect airtight, and it's in a humid place. It's possible that the container is airtight, but enough water vapour gets in each time you open it to cause problems. This will be more of an issue for small amounts in a big container. To test and ...


10

It's supposed to be proof that the tomatoes were "vine ripened", instead of being picked green, but the definition is such that there only has to be some sign of color change when they're picked to be sold as "vine ripened", so they're generally still picked mostly green. So yeah, pretty much a marketing gimmick, although not all that new....


8

They are not the same. Pasteurization is the use of high temperature (think 100C max, though lower temps are typical) for a short time (HTST) in order to destroy pathogens and increase shelf life. Pasteurization does not kill or deactivate all microorganisms, but drastically reduces the bacterial load. Sterilization is a process that is used to stop ALL ...


5

The difference between the words has mostly historical roots. Both refer to a process which reduces the number of bacteria. The important difference is the proportion of bacteria killed. Contrary to popular belief, sterilization doesn't kill all bacteria. Microbiologists measure bacterial reduction in log numbers. There are different levels of sterilization ...


4

This is a note on the terminology - for the use see Tetsujin's answer. A freezer is a food-storage device that goes below freezing (0°C). This may be a standalone unit with a door opening forwards with a lid opening upwards, also called a "chest freezer" or "deep freeze"* the colder compartment in a fridge-freezer (often the lower one ...


3

Chill it in the fridge for an hour or two (aids slicing) before you open it, then slice it all immediately. Wrap each slice separately & freeze. I'm not sure I'd want to eat 2-week-old sponge cake whether it was wrapped in marzipan or not, kept anywhere except a freezer. This type of product is only shelf-stable until it's opened, after that its life-...


3

It's probably a "best before date," which means the pita bread will lose quality after that date. Pita bread tends to dry out and get stale quickly.


3

It depends. Temperature works on a scale, the cooler it is, usually the less active bacteria will be. With this in mind, my fridge has a special zone for meats and fish, very very close to zero degrees. The food won't freeze, but bacterial activity will be slowed enough that I would put it there a couple of days without worrying. Freezing goes way beyond ...


2

I normally pack it in, leaving maybe half inch of headroom, barely tighten the lid on so gas can get out (have your fermenting jars on a tray to catch leaking during this time). Then after two or three days i unscrew the lid, wipe the threads and lip off the jar with a clean damp cloth, clean my lid, then tighten them down firmly. I think if you use the ...


2

I would suggest dry brining the extra half and leaving uncovered overnight so you get an even crispier skin.


2

Wash them right before you use them. You could wash them when you get home, it's not going to hurt most things if you're gentle, but that won't mean they're still clean once you're ready to use them. I'm guessing you aren't storing them somewhere sterile, so they will get dirty again during storage, and you'll just have to wash them again. The other issue ...


2

Is it safe to store fresh meat and fish for a bit longer at 33F than at higher temperatures? Probably. OP's original question asked about two weeks, and the answer is: at 33F, food is probably safe for greater than two weeks, per the scientific literature on food safety. I know everyone wants to quote FDA regulations or whatever here, but they are a one-...


2

Storing food in this manner would not be a good idea. An ice water bath as you describe will prevent the food from freezing, keeping it barely above freezing temperature. This will not allow uncooked or unpreserved meat or fish to last any longer than the usual recommendation.


1

I don't know if much moisture leaves the meat through evaporation from more than just the very outside, even with a longer wait. I would be surprised if this made a big difference to the quantity of juices released during cooking, so intuitively I would not share your worry about the steak getting too dry. However, I would worry about an uncovered steak ...


1

Yes, most refrigerators include a freezer compartment (either as an insulated area inside the main refrigerator compartment, or as a separately reached, generally smaller compartment), where ice is made; the term "deep fridge" and "freezer" are synonyms. There are also separate freezers available, though those are less common in ...


1

In principle you could proceed as you suggested. However, a few small tweaks may improve the overall results. 1. Straining the remaining fat. Small particles of whatever is floating in the fat (either added on purpose or just pieces of water food you were frying) will be tasty in the first round of frying, but probably just burn and turn bitter in ...


1

From my experience, storing it in the fridge is the only option, but it will hardly taste as before. Storing it uncovered will make the pastry super dry afterwards (at least when I stored it my first times), and covering it with a plastic film might make it a bit soggy (the pastry). I'd recommend storing it in a lunchbox (or with a plastic film, AND inside a ...


1

You will obviously need to refrigerate. If it is only 12-hours, I would cool, then leave it uncovered in your refrigerator, or maybe a loose draping of plastic. For longer storage, I would wrap well and freeze. Reheat in a 425-450F (218 - 232C) oven until just warm in the center (test with a cake tester by inserting into thickest part, wait 5- 10 sec., ...


1

Sweet potatoes are not in the potato family (Solanaceae) and as you say, do not develop solanine, or other glycoalkaloids such as chaconine. The only toxin they are listed as having in Medical toxicology of natural substances is ipomearone, typically produced in response to fungal infection. I cannot find any indication that is produced in response to ...


1

Rice attracts quite a lot of moisture and may develop a moss-like smell in the longer run. Most of the rice that is used in India doesn't require airtight storage but shouldn't be exposed to moisture. Some of the aromatic rice varieties such as Basmati are sealed and aged for perfection. These types of rice may lose their aroma if kept in the open air. So ...


1

Conventional wisdom says that freshly cooked food is better than re-heated food (*) So I would cook half today and second half tomorrow. I would maybe marinate the second half of the wings. (*) yes there are exceptions like leftover pizza. :-)


1

Did you buy it from the grocery store? Most salmon have been flash frozen to rid of parasites. If that's the case, I would just leave it in the fridge if you're planning to cook it in 2 days. If you were to freeze it, the freeze-thaw process could affect the texture of the salmon.


1

I would expect a professional kitchen to store pans in a manner that is efficient and safe. Pans must be easy to access, easy to pick up, easy to stack (when they come back from cleaning). Anecdotal, in open kitchen that I've seen, small pans are close to the cooking stations; often on a shelf above the stations; bigger pans are stacked a little bit ...


1

It's common practice to stack the same sized pans and/or bowls. No one want to sort through sizes. It's less efficient. Given your comment/clarification...it makes sense to keep pans in the same place all the time as well. During a busy service, I would want to know where everything is at all times. Consistency and efficiency are primary considerations.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible