Hot answers tagged

37

Ethylene, most likely. You've said that that lime was at the bottom of the bowl, mostly covered with other fruit. I'll bet it was very close to some kiwis. Fruit -- particularly fruit like kiwi which ripens after being picked -- produces and releases ethylene. Ethylene serves a key role in fruit ripening. This is why you're advised to keep bananas in a ...


25

Based on my personal experience of living in a 100-year-old apartment building, where both pantry moths and flour beetles were basically chronic: The freezer will prevent bugs more effectively than the fridge, which also works better than the pantry. Particularly, the fridge only keeps bugs from hatching, but the freezer will often kill the eggs. Both the ...


18

From my research on this, it sounds like you should be minimising the following as much as possible (two of which you've mentioned in your question): Exposure to light Exposure to heat Oxidisation To avoid this, it sounds like the best option is a fully opaque, thick-walled vessel, that is sealable. This article on the Kitchn recommends a ceramic cruet, ...


15

Get a darkened glass bottle - can be dark green or amber-colored. Amber-colored filters out better than green, it is easier to recycle and produce (therefore, cheaper), that's why we very regularly use them in pharmaceuticals. The most important things for you to focus on, though, are temperature and oxygen. Your bottle must have a well-fitting cap, bung, or ...


10

If there are no bugs in the flour you buy, then storing it in an airtight container will prevent bugs from getting in. This could be your fridge but could equally well be a large tupperware or similar container. In the UK flour is typically sold in supermarkets in paper bags that range from 500g to 2.5kg; I just leave mine in a cupboard and have no problems, ...


9

Let me state a premise. You can preserve olive oil in the original, sealed, metal can for years without much harm, if stored in a cool place (between about 5°C and 15°C) with few temperature variations. I did it for years with extra-virgin (EV) olive oil. The only problem is that the oil will lose many micro-nutrients (especially vitamins) and some of its ...


9

While dry aging does impact texture, storing a portion that you might purchase for yourself, or a small number of people, in the refrigerator for a few days will not impact the final texture. Instead, consider purchasing high quality cuts, and the correct cut for your application. Consider a tenderizing pre-treatment (some marinades are intended for ...


8

Cook them in dishes. I use sun dried tomatoes in my go-to pasta sauce. While mine are usually in oil, I have used others in the past. I suggest thinking of them in the same way as anchovies. On their own, they can be near inedible, but when cooked in a dish, they almost dissolve into pure flavor. The same can be done with your tomatoes: After a while, ...


8

I feel I must offer a contradicting opinion to @rumtscho's answer. The product you seem to have is indeed shown in the catalogue at the page of "smoked salmon" products, but note that it is the only one not being named "cold smoked", but "marinated". And just by the looks of it I assume this is actually Gravlax: raw salmon, ...


6

Your freezer is set at too high a temperature, probably just below the freezing point. Pure water freezes at 32°F/0°C so your meats and vegetables are freezing just fine, however adding sugar and/or salt to water reduces the freezing point. A 30% sugar solution freezes at around 28.5°F, salt water is about the same. The fact they are mushy means your freezer ...


5

My family has lived in Texas since the 1970's, and keeping flour is a problem. We've found the sure thing is to get a container with a spring-clip latch on the lid. These come in large enough sizes to drop a standard 5 pound package of flour into one, so you don't have to pour it out and label the jar. These come in lightweight plastic now. The container ...


5

I had the same problem. Here's how I solved it. First, I distribute 5 L of olive oil into a bunch of mason jars. Second, I put them in the fridge. It is a dark place, and the oil preserves well there. In my experience, it tastes great for at least a year after I do this. Interestingly, it congeals while refrigerated. That's why I use a spoon to scoop out ...


4

First, in general freezing is possibly the best method for storing grains long-term if you're not going to use them up within a few months. So it's never a bad idea to freeze dried wheat, rice, buckwheat, etc. if you have the space. Certain grains, like wheat germ, contain oils that oxidize quickly and have to be stored cold or they go rancid in a few ...


4

I would freeze it. Crumble will defrost pretty much instantly when you take it out of the freezer, so you can just pour it straight from the freezer container onto your yogurt. If you freeze it on a tray and then dump it into a container, it should stay crumbly rather than freeze into a block so it's easy to handle.


4

The chemicals associated with the odor of rancid or spoiled meat can indeed float around in a freezer and condense on other surfaces, such as the other meats.* Since these chemicals are detectable at extremely low concentrations, even a small amount of migration would make those objects noticeably rotten-smelling. That probably didn't happen to the meat, ...


3

Summary: a wine bottle and a matching vacuum pump (and/or marbles). Wine has many of the same issues with storage. I occasionally enjoy a good dry red, but that is infrequently and only about half a glass at a time. What to do with the opened bottle? Wine comes (mostly) in coloured glass bottles, which protects against light (more about that later) I store ...


3

When shopping large quantities of olive oil for regular household use I would recommend to go for a brand that is using bag-in-box packaging instead of the common tin containers as this allows to dispense oil as required while avoiding oxygen contact of the stocked part entirely.


3

This depends on many factors. From what I've seen, meat tenderness vs. toughness depends mainly on the amount of shock you create when cooking it. The main effects I've observed: if you put the super-cold meat from the refrigerator right on the pan, the shocked proteins (esp. long keratin fibers) are going to shrink, causing the steak to became super ...


2

You can't prevent it, that's how it works. It will always lose some liquid, no matter what. This is why supermarkets sell packaged meat with "diapers" on the bottom. As mentioned in comments, you can buy dry aged beef. It has already lost that moisture, so you won't have the liquid to deal with, if that bothers you. This doesn't mean, of course, ...


2

If you mix matcha powder with cream, sugar and water, you have created a substance that will make some microbes very happy. For that mix, the same rule as for other "prepared foods" apply: No longer safe after two or three days in the refrigerator. What you are seeing is one or multiple of the following: Green Deposit: Powder sinking to the bottom ...


2

For many years, I did the same as what my mother did— I kept a smaller bottle sold for olive oil, and refilled it from a large can of olive oil. The reason is, it has the little plastic insert in the bottle so it doesn’t pour too quickly, and it’s a dark green glass, to prevent the light issues. (But I keep it in a cabinet, so it’s only out in the light when ...


2

If you are sure, that there is no sugar left in your vinegar, then the answer is yes. https://www.urbanfermentation.com/how-to-store-homemade-vinegar/ Acetic acid bacteria use O2 to convert alcohol. If the bottle is closed and they used up the O2, the fermentation stops. Even if there is some air in the bottle when you seal it, the pressure build-up caused ...


1

Any of those wraps will be fine. My typical practice, whether curing my own or purchasing a large amount, is to portion in to smaller pieces. Those destined for storage get vacuum sealed. If I have a lot, I freeze them. The portions for daily use either get wrapped in butcher paper (if I have it) or, more often than not, placed in a zip-lock bag and ...


1

If it is a cured product then it does not need refrigeration. A cured product has an indefinite lifespan, that was the whole point of curing to increase the lifespan of meat products. Keep it away from bugs and rats and it should be OK. Maybe if you live in a humid tropic area you may have problems with mold growth but that is a stretch.


1

I am partial to this solution, though its viability is dependent on your circumstances. I use food grade 5 gallon plastic buckets to store dry goods like flour, sugar, and rice. A bucket like this: from the Home Depot, along with a plastic lid made to twist off easily like this: This provides an airtight and watertight storage solution for dry goods, but ...


1

Two potential solutions: Buy a different brand, one that's not packed in salt. Most sun-dried tomatoes are air dried and have minimal salt content, even if they're not packed in oil. Soak these the way you would salt cod: in the fridge, for a day or more, changing the water 2-3 times. This should remove the salt, but might also turn them to mush.


1

Freeze them and they should last much longer; wrap them tightly in plastic wrap or foil to avoid freezer burn.


1

It certainly sounds too warm. If it's set sensibly, a badly iced up freezer can be warmer inside than it should be. This can include ice built up behind the back wall, if it's s frost-free model that relies on airflow. A good defrost may be necessary. Icing can be accelerated by something caught in the door, or by open containers of liquid, for example ...


1

It also depends on how the fish was killed. The two key helpers here that lead to a long shelf life even of non-preserved fish (i.e. not smoked, salted, pickled, marinated, dried, canned, etc.) are 1. exsanguination and 2. the utter destruction of the animal's CNS as quickly as possible. This can be achieved by sticking something pointy, like an awl, ...


1

Your salmon is not raw, it is smoked. This is a common conservation technique, and it is the reason why your fish has a long shelf life. The packaging has nothing to do with it. You can confirm that this specific product is smoked by looking it up in the producer's catalogue, https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/63286903/vici-cataolog-en-2020-2021-web - ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible