8

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


7

Not difficult at all if you truly want to get every possible last drop. Choose a large clean tea towel for this purpose only. After you've drained most of the liquids out, line your colander with the tea towel and pour the last bit with meat and vegetables in. I found using clothespins to the towel in place is best. Gather the corners up and you can either ...


6

Cheese cloth is easy to find and does a great job when we make horchata. More Details I use a regular mesh strainer like the one below, and I line it with a few layers of cheese cloth. Depending on your colander's design, it might work too. The number of layers depends on what your straining, and how loose the cheesecloth is. I use it more often to make ...


5

Frequently health food stores and asian markets will have "milk bags" that are used for straining soy milk and nut milks. They usually look either like a pillowcase with a drawstring at the open end, or occasionally a long cloth tube with a wire handle. Either way, you pour the liquid in and the fine mesh of the cloth holds the particles back, but the large ...


4

I run mine through a colander first, then through a sieve. Then I lay a single layer of cheese cloth over the top and press down wirh a spoon so its submerged a little all the way around. Put it in the fridge overnight. Next morning remove cheese cloth, which takes most of the coagulated and chilled fat with it. Run through clean folded cheese cloth in ...


4

At restaurant supply stores, you can get much larger fine strainers than consumer stores normally have. Another type is the chinoise or china cap, which may or may not be suitable for your needs; these typically have very fine mesh. These can be available in larger capacities. You may also have success with a tamis, which is a drum type strainer, although ...


4

Fine mesh sieve is the usual way, but the way you describe it, yours is not fine enough. Look in professional stores for a "chinois", this is the kind of sieve you need. But yes, it will take a long time. In classic restaurants, the stock will be cleared before going through the chinois. This is done by floating a rack of eggwhite which bounds the stray ...


4

I like to use a lint free surgical towel. It works much better than cheesecloth and is not as slow as a coffee filter.


3

If you want a clear stock, cheesecloth (and a healthy dose of patience) is the way to go. I would speculate that you might get better performance by first getting the big bits out by using a colander, and then go on to the fine-mesh sieve, finishing off with another pass through the sieve lined with cheesecloth. At that point, you can also use a little ...


3

From this website: What does mesh size mean? Figuring out mesh sizes is simple. All you do is count the number of openings in a one US inch of screen. The number of openings is the mesh size. So a 4-mesh screen means there are four little squares across one linear inch of screen. A 100-mesh screen has 100 openings, and so on. As the number ...


3

The best way to strain stock is actually to siphon it off, that way you don't agitate the liquid as you pour the whole lot out. It's a simple process: Find a vessel to hold the strained stock and place the stockpot above it at a higher level. (I normally put a wide bowl in the sink and then the pot on the counter top; I've also used a stack of cookbooks ...


2

i would use a cheesecloth (very inexpensive and available at grocery stores or Amazon) to hold the vegetables, etc. Place a rack (maybe a cookie-cooling rack) over a lipped pan like a broiler pan, and then press the veggie-filled cheesecloth against the rack using a cutting board, a rolling pin, or whatever. i'm not familiar with the milk bag you mentioned,...


2

I freeze my broth then let it defrost through cheesecloth.


1

I am part of the Instant Pot (pressure cooker) community and we make a LOT of yogurt. I don't strain mine, but others swear by this strainer. I think it's plastic, though, so this won't help if you're trying to avoid it. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0091XNL0I/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_dp_T1_CS3DzbDN0MKPP


1

Have you seen this piece and the Bouillon strainer mentioned in it? There is no information on mesh size unfortunately.


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