10

You can put things in the cavity to help flavor the chicken as well. A bundle of fresh herbs, garlic, an onion, fresh fruit, etc. Stuffing from a cavity is divine though, don't knock it until you've tried it!


7

I am firmly in the "stuffing is evil" camp... but lets take that as read :-) If you absolutely must have in the bird stuffing, here is a link to a (I hope legal) excerpt of Alton Brown's Good Eats, showing his technique for doing turkey with stuffing: http://www.aol.com/video/alton-browns-turkey-with-stuffing/444711017/ He uses a food-safe cotton bag, ...


7

You can use lasagna noodles too and just spread the filling and roll them up. I've done that and gave up trying to stuff manicotti noodles.


4

Chris I think you're going to struggle to make two distinctive dishes whilst essentially using the same ingredients for both of them - therein lies your problem. Do you have to use cranberries and chestnuts in both? There's many different types of vegetarian stuffings you might use that would compliment your nut roast rather than almost copy it. How ...


4

These recipes seem to be a misunderstanding how stuffed pepper recipes typically work. At least when we are looking at the Balkan tradition, where the dish originated - this answer focuses on it only. If there is by now a changed form in US recipes, it is not included in my use of the word "traditional". Traditionally, stuffed peppers are made with ...


3

IMO you should only use herbs some onion and fresh fruit as others have stated. Anything that is bread based must heat to 160 to be safe to eat after the fact which means by that time your chicken will be likely 170 and dry. If you insist on a proper stuffing then pull your chicken at 160 then remove the stuffing and put it back in the oven till it's 160


3

Any bread can be dry - slice or cube and put it in the oven at 140F, or low, until it's as dry as you like. Wonderbread is not even bread, in my opinion - it's certainly not anything like a yeast bread, even one made from all white flour. So it's not hard to be very different from it. As such you might want to heed the advice in comments to scale back your ...


3

I think you are over thinking this... One one hand, the size of the cavity in the chicken is approximately proportional to the width or height of the chicken, and the width is approximately proportional to the cube root of the weight. However, for small values, the because of the cube law, the volume of the cavity is not going to change by huge amounts--a ...


3

Your method of stuffing and freezing raw should be safe. Assuming you are following safe food handling and freezing methods, you will be fine. Just prep your chicken and get it into the freezer within the recommended window of two hours that it can safely be in the "danger zone" of 40-140 F. As it pertains to bacteria, you can think of freezing as stopping ...


3

What I found works great for me is partially boiling the manicotti until they get semi flexible. I also use the ziplock bag method for stuffing, but here's the thing. Rather than holding the tube as I stuff it, I put it inside a tall shot glass and THEN fill it. The glass I use is just a tiny bit bigger than the manicotti which means I can stuff it as full ...


2

This is easy. Get plastic a water, soda or pop bottle of about 500ml 3/4 pint having a neck of the same diameter or smaller than the canneloni. Cut the bottle it in half and use it to scoop out the filling from the bowl or pan and hold it upright to let the excess liquid drain back to the pan or bowl. Then get a wooden spoon handle or some other thing that ...


2

I cut a soft drink bottle in half, fill with the mixture, and use it to funnel the mixture into a sleeping cannelloni forcing the mixture with gloved hands.


2

For shells and cannoli, I just use a good zip lock bag. Place the filling in the quart size bag with the zipper up. Close the bag enough to get as much air you can out. Place the filling in the refrigerator in a tall cup or mug with the zipper up as you are getting the shells ready. The filling will stiffen some, which is good. Using good scissor, cut a ...


2

I can't find any resources on what to do when you have food with too much pectin in it, but you could combine the goose berries with something which has a low amount of pectin, check out group II or III in this pdf. Don't puree your other ingredient totally and you'll get a thicker filling, as well.


2

The stuffing doesn't add much flavor to the chicken, so no. If I even bother making stuffing, I like to cook the it in a separate pan. I usually have better luck getting the stuffing to a safe temperature without overcooking the meat, and it doesn't get as greasy. It also lets me get plenty of crispy brown bits on the top of the stuffing, which you really ...


2

I don't think the problem is the freezing per-se, it's the likelihood of ending up with things not fully cooked, or of them being in the danger zone (between 40 and 140 degrees Farenheit) for too long. If the total cumulative time in the danger zone for any part of the bird or stuffing is within 60 minutes (some people say 120 minutes, but that may include ...


1

In my opinion, sous vide is the way to go here. Throwing this in an oven is going to mean that you are likely going to overcook the outside, by the time the inside is at a safe temperature. Because you have to cook these birds whole, there is really no way to differentiate between dark and white meat no matter what approach you take. I would sous vide at a ...


1

But, as Catija indicates below its not clear whether you are stuffing mushrooms or whether the stuffing contains mushroom. Based on the other stuff used I am going to go ahead and guess that you are stuffing mushrooms with this, but I am going to make this and if/then answer to cover both cases. If the stuffing contains mushrooms: you have to decide ...


1

The problem with your premise is that 165f must be reached for the stuffing to be pasteurized. However, pasteurization begins at the top end of the "danger zone." The USDA spec sets that bar at 140f (in reality, you are out of the danger zone at 127f, but we'll use the USDA spec for the purposes of this discussion). There is a time component to ...


1

Put the gooseberries (raw) on the puff pastry rounds with a tsp sugar crimp pastry, cook in oven for 15 mins. til golden. Simple.


1

It's less messy to just use your hands. With careful technique, of course. Especially if you start out using your hands, instead of trying a spoon first - somehow it always ends up way messier if your start with a spoon and switch to hands, than if you start out intending to use your hands. The easy way to stuff manicotti to grab a little chunk of filling ...


1

I'd cook the stuffing separately; much easier to get both to the ideal temperature that way. You do not want to serve overcooked chicken, and you must not serve undercooked chicken or undercooked stuffing exposed to raw chicken. I'd suggest brining your chicken (in a brine containing herbs, garlic, onion). Keep in mind that most of the herb flavor will stay ...


1

This is an odd kind of answer to the question that you're not exactly asking; If you're interested in stuffing the bird, and consuming the stuffing, but not interested in the yuck of unstuffing the thing, you could fill an improvised food-grade net (i.e. cheesecloth, muslin wort/hop bag, grain sock, etc) that would be permeable AND allow for you to remove ...


1

I made cannelloni for the first time last night. What a mess. I cooked the pasta as instructed, but when it came time to fill them, I had great difficulty. First I used a spoon while holding the tube in one hand -- no go. Then I had the idea of putting the tube in a glass to steady it. Still no success. Then I put the filling in a zip-lock bag. Still a big ...


1

Cook the Manicotti until done. Remove from water and cool Then CUT THE NOODLES UP ONE SIDE, all the way along the length of the cooked noodle. There is still a fold in the noodle on the non-cut side, but it is open and almost a flat sheet, and you can easily put all the filling into the noodle. Then with the filling in it, you can press it "sealed" and put ...


1

Very good advice, must try. Regarding soggy/wet pasta, I use the same procedure for both mani's and lasagna-Cook the noodles just enough so that they are pliable, but not fully cooked (you can cut the lasagna noodles with a knife, but they are stiff enough to build). I don't bring my pasta water to a boil, I just heat it enough so that the pasta will cook ...


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