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54

It is less useful than what you think Frame challenge incoming... Cling film is very light and made especially for such purposes. The environmental damage is extremely low - which limits what alternatives you can choose. Most alternatives (including those already mentioned in the other answers) will be so much more resource demanding to make, dispose or ...


11

You don't have to use clingfilm (cling wrap, saran wrap depending where you are in the world), there are alternatives as long as the pastry is not sticky: Plastic bags: I reuse zippable plastic bags as many times as I can, you can wash them by turning them inside out Baking paper: baking paper can be re-used as long as it stays clean Aluminum foil: again ...


9

Pasta can be made from many types of flour. Often, this is predicated on style of pasta or the dish. 100% AP flour will be just fine for your ravioli. I use it often when making fresh pasta. Substituting the AP flour for the semolina might impact the hydration. I would hold off on the water at first. If the dough feels too dry, add water a tablespoon ...


7

Put it in a bowl, large enough so the dough doesn't reach the top (if possible), cover it with a damp dishtowel (not wet, just damp). Voila. Totally ecological, and works better than plastic wrap because the dough can breathe. If the towel touches the dough, you might have to scrape it off depending on the dough and the time involved, but that's not ...


6

"High" gluten flour has, at most 15% gluten. "Indian" white flour, or maida has 7.5%. If you manage to pull it off, you basically end up with what's essentially a pan fried slab of mock meat, rather than a bread - basically seitan. You typically add gluten to flour to modify its characteristics - the only way you're going to be able to make naan that ...


6

Mustard seeds and other spices are there for flavor only; it's perfectly safe to leave them out. But don't mess with amounts of salt or vinegar given in your recipe--those are important for preventing bacterial growth. If your recipe also contains bay leaf or grape leaf, those too can be omitted, but you pickles won't be as crisp. Likewise if you omit the ...


5

I have reusable teflon sheets for lining cake tins and baking sheets. They also work well for wrapping pastry and dough. With pastry the easiest way is to make a folded parcel with the opening side underneath on a plate or dish. They wash up by hand or in the dishwasher and also save you lots of baking parchment/greaseproof paper and some foil. Another ...


5

It's not a direct substitution, but you can use orzo in place of paella rice as long as you vary the liquid. When I make a paella I use 3x the liquid as the rice by volume. With orzo that may be too much - if it doesn't absorb it you'll have a watery paella. My approach would be to add 1.5 times liquid to the pasta by volume (not including your tomatoes) ...


4

I have always used wax paper to wrap pastry for the fridge. It's always worked for me. (Note: this is not the same thing as the baking paper/parchment mentioned in other answers.)


4

"Bread machine flour" and "bread flour" are interchangeable terms. Bread flour, sometimes called bread machine flour, is what most bread maker recipe books will say to use in order to achieve the best results. (Source) So yes, you should use bread flour in the recipe. It has higher protein than all-purpose flour and will help your bread rise better and ...


4

Yes, Panache is available. It seems to be similar to Shandy, or "Sneeuwwitje" in Dutch.


4

No, I don't believe vital wheat gluten will work in this way for your recipe. When hydrated, vital wheat gluten is very sticky, and you can't roll or flatten it out very easily like you would need for naan -- and I'm not even sure it would cook and rise the same way as regular flour. There are gluten-free all-purpose flour that are made for baking. I would ...


3

I make paella often and any short grain rice is preferred to orzo. If you can find Arborio rice (which is what I use living in middle america rather than the more classical bomba or calasparra rices), that works great in a pinch. You could probably make orzo work if you pay attention to the water content and make sure to cook all the water off by the end, ...


3

Perhaps she could make "regular" pancakes and use the melted chocolate candy bar in place of traditional syrup? Imagine, a stack of hot pancakes with melted chocolate poured over them... perhaps a fresh strawberry on the side. oh my! I might have to make some for myself!


3

Frozen ube is usually grated, raw, and packed in liquid. It comes as a solid block of ice. Frozen ube is easily found in Asian grocery stores. Especially those that carry Philippine products. In my experience it is much easier to find frozen ube than raw. I expect that is why your recipe calls for it. I haven't personally used fresh ube but from what I've ...


2

You don't need the shrimp paste to make kimchee. I don't think you would notice the difference if you left it out. Better to leave it out than use the paste you bought, which has a very strong and distinctive flavor.


2

In the Jura region of North-East France, the cheese of choice for fondue tends to be Comté, with a splash of white wine and some garlic added. It will be smooth and stringy when melted, but more fatty and will have a stronger flavour than American Swiss cheese. The downside will be the price - especially in the US, Comté is a high quality, premium cheese ...


2

Also worth noting is that the cheese product sold as 'swiss cheese' in the US has a very indirect relationship with Swiss cheese, i.e. cheese from Switzerland. It's supposed to be reminiscent of Emmentaler, but the differences are greater than the similarities. (At least in my rather limited experience.) There are different cheese mixtures used when making ...


2

A very young baby Gouda will melt nicely. Also, a couple of Mexican cheeses, queso quesadilla and queso chihuahua, will melt well. The queso chihuahua is usually a slight bit sharper than the others. While these cheeses do melt very well, you may need a tiny bit of milk or cream to have them at a proper fondue consistency. An upside to cheeses like these ...


2

Are you opposed to "fake cheese", AKA "cheese food products"? The best known at least in the US is Velveeta, but there are alternates including recipes you can find to make your own. They would have a different flavor profile than Swiss and others that I call white cheeses. Home made versions are usually a combination of America, Cheddar, and milk or ...


2

I have tried adding other acidic ingredients, such as lemon, to compensate for what tomato adds to a curry. It doesn't work with dairy, but it does work with nut-based milks (coconut and cashew are my go-to for curry). It won't substitute anything by itself, but it still helps balance out the flavour profile that's thrown outta wack from lack of tomato. I ...


1

You couldn't use only vital wheat gluten, as that would produce a rubbery mass, that would be too elastic to stretch out to a flat shape (and stay there). Though it can still be tasty, it wouldn't really resemble naan or any other flatbread. While I don't have an exact naan recipe, I do have a pizza recipe — which uses a large portion of Vital Wheat Gluten ...


1

Yes-ish. Managed to make something similar with margarine, almond milk, flour and nutritional yeast flakes (was going for a cheese-style sauce for mac and vegan-cheese). Don't ask me for the recipe, I don't have exact ratio but here's my order of operations: boil almond milk, add mustard, flour, salt and any other seasonings you want, then once a boil has ...


1

The primary reason coconut flour recipes (especially a high hydration recipe like pancakes) end up tasting like eggs is because they are primarily eggs with very little flour. Coconut flour is extremely absorbent, which means two things: For the same amount of liquid, you need less coconut flour compared to other flours like flaxseed meal, almond flour, ...


1

Condensed milk and evaporated milk have the same consistency (almost) simply because both of them are made by the same process of evaporating 60% of the water content but the similarity ends there. Because sweet condensed milk contains added sugar you cannot substitute condensed milk for evaporated milk. Evaporated milk is not as sweet as condensed milk.


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