19

In general, we can assume that it will never boil off to zero. By a combination of reduction and dilution we can get to undetectable levels, less than in ripe fruit and some breads. The "zero BAC" requirement has to be able to handle people eating normal foods, so tends to have some margin, just not enough to have a drink. To do this you'd simmer ...


11

As a general rule, the answer by Chris H is accurate. Most recipes that involve wine only use a small amount and typically involve cooking in a way that causes most of the alcohol to evaporate (or combust if it’s a flambé), and in general they will have no more impact on BAC than a cup of fruit juice would. In cases where it really matters you can indeed get ...


8

Himalayan salt is not really from the Himalayas, but from the Salt Range, which is nearby -not exactly 'Himalayan snow melt' (in fact an underground salt deposit from a sea that dried up hundreds of millions of years ago). It has a bunch of impurities (or 'minerals'), which make it pink. It had no commercial value until recently when it became popular for ...


5

My understanding is that within some communities, it is believed that iodized salts slows down or kills the microbes. This is not true, which has been shown a couple of times: studying sauerkraut and studying fermented cucumbers.


3

First be wary of language barrier. In some regions/countries people are making crepes and calling tham pancakes. What in US is called pancakes in some regions/countries call for buttermilk and is called (for example) "Racuchy". Anyway - use aquafaba. Just yesterday I made some crepes with it. They are nice, soft, "rolly" and apart from a ...


3

Quesadilla literally means "little cheese." A quesadilla without cheese isn't a quesadilla. It's a tortilla folded in half with stuff inside. To get a folded-in-half tortilla to stick together without cheese, try eggs. Put the open tortilla in the pan, then pour a thin layer of beaten eggs on top. Cook slowly until the eggs start to solidify but ...


2

I don't think it is useful to think of aquafaba as a egg-white substitute. Rather, you should think of whipped aquafaba as a replacement for French meringue, in cases you are not relying on it setting under heat. So, when you need a vegan foam, you can try aquafaba (after whipping) to get the right texture. To regard it as a general replacement for egg ...


2

Yes you can, some Portuguese/Brazilian ganache recipes actually don't use cream at all. Cream (creme de leite) can be prepared this home-made way: 500 ml of fresh milk 1 egg yolk passed through the sieve 200 g butter 200 g hydrogenated vegetable fat (margarine) In a pan, mix the sieved yolk and the milk, heat it slow so that the yolk does not cook and the ...


2

In baking, you can almost always replace cow's milk with a non-dairy product. It's usually a matter of taste. In stove-top cooking, you may have to experiment more, especially if making creamy sauces. In that case, thicker, non-dairy milks should be tried. Here, again taste will probably be important, but it is probably important to pay attention to ...


2

While shiitake mushrooms do have a distinct and identifiable flavor, the reason dried skiitake mushrooms are added in broth and stock making is for the umami. The flavor of umami is the result of the glutimates available in dried mushrooms (as well as other ingredients). While shiitake mushrooms contain a lot of glutimates, any other dried (or even fresh, ...


1

Nutritional yeast is a valuable source of B vitamins, especially B12, for vegans. Recently it's had an image makeover, with cutesy names like 'nooch' It's commonly described as having a "cheesey, nutty" flavor; more technically, it's a vegan source of umami, the glutamic acid flavor associated with rich protein sources. (Umami alone apparently ...


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