5

No. You'd have to be able to fully homogenize the butter and milk back together first, which you're not going to be able to do. You can melt butter and add it to milk to make heavy cream for some cooking needs, but it won't whip. Half and half will whip if you get it cold enough, but it's not going to be nearly as stable as whipping cream.


5

Here is a good article explaining the different types of molasses. Excerpt: True treacle dates back to Victorian times. The pale, refined molasses is notably sweeter and has a much more mellow flavor than molasses. Nowadays, treacle is a blend of molasses and refinery syrup. It ranges in color from light gold to nearly black. British treacle can be ...


3

Treacle is a more general term meaning a syrup formed during the sugar refining process. It can range in color and consistency. Black treacle is molasses, but there are lighter versions of treacle. Of course, the flavor profiles will be different depending on the type of treacle. For toffee pudding, the use of molasses will work, but the flavor will ...


2

Retrospective answer from OP: Mechanically, a 1:1 substitution worked fine -- the dough rose, the loaf shape was perfect, and the bread had a good texture and mouth feel. Taste-wise, the honey has a sweeter and subtly nicer flavor. If I were making bread to eat unadorned, I'd certainly prefer the honey. But for sandwiches and jams the nuance is lost, and ...


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