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9

Sugar does more than just make ice cream sweet. It also controls the way ice cream freezes. Without it, you tend to get bigger ice crystals, which have an unpleasant mouth feel. There are substitutes. Breyer's sugar-free ice cream, for example, has guar gum, polydextrose, cellulose gum and gel, and maltodextrin, among other things. Home ice cream makers don'...


7

That 1/4th cup margarine and the 2 eggs are not enough to give those brownies the moisture they need. I suspect you want something low in sugar and fat. Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD created two books that talk about substitutions for fat and sugar in recipes. One technique to replace fat (like butter) in a recipe is to use baby food prunes or applesauce. ...


7

The tomato paste in your recipe is a large contributor to the sweetness. You could reduce the amount you are using or substitute with tomato sauce. The addition of an acid would also help balance the sweetness. A splash of vinegar or wine for example.


6

what is so special about sugar Sugar is a pure short-chain carbohydrate. It is a solid which makes the bulk of the ice cream. Ice cream has a narrow range of ratios of liquid, fat, and non-fat solids. If you throw out the sugar, you cannot replace it by something liquid, because the ice cream will have the wrong texture (not smooth enough). You cannot ...


6

No, there are no other agents. Caramelization is literally sugar in a certain state. If you remove all the sugar, you cannot have a caramelization taste. You can make cookies which don't taste caramelized, of course. As for the "important structurally" part, it depends what cookie you are trying to make. If you want to achieve the texture of a sugar-rich ...


5

I think classic hard candy would be difficult if not impossible to make with fruit juice because it combines the fruit sugars (fructose) with a lot of other things, and hard candy is normally made by heating sucrose (table sugar, which is 50% fructose, 50% glucose) to the hard-crack stage (300-310F) to the point where it is essentially 99% sugar. As the ...


5

Sangria doesn't have "fizzy pop" of any description in it. It has brandy. That was where it went wrong, long before the sweetener stage. Sugar of any description is optional, though personally I'd rather stick my head in a fire than put artificial sweeteners in it, I'd just rather it without anything. Rioja - Tempranillo, Garnacha etc Brandy Fruit ...


4

I buy bulk pure Stevioside powder online. It's much cheaper to buy the pure powder that way and make your own stock solution. I make my stock strong enough so that 1 drop equals 1 teaspoon (4g) sugar in sweetness, 3 drops per tablespoon (12g). For 100 ml: 23.5 gram Stevia powder 20 ml 95% ethanol Bring to 100 ml with water. The alcohol is added both ...


4

From a bulk perspective you don't have to replace sugar with anything, you certainly don't need want to add starch to compensate as that will not do favors for your consistency and mouth feel. Sugar helps the consistency of ice cream by reducing ice crystal formation, protein does not, and starch does a bit but makes your ice cream, well, starchy rather ...


4

It's really better to work in weight especially when cooking with different types of sugar. Trying to change the fineness of sugar, and the sugar chemistry, and then make up for it with adjusting volumes is prone to failure. Halva is easy to make but hard to get the right consistency. My last lot ended up too soft/sticky. But it's ill-defined: different ...


4

Many people have already suggested making your Sangria the more traditional way by just adding pieces of fruit rather than concentrated fruit juices— depending on why you are attempting to eliminate the sugars (e.g. for health reasons) this might be the best approach. Another option might be to zest some fruits or use a potato peeler to take long strips of ...


3

There's a few things that could be happening here, you could have too much moisture in the batter, not enough leavening agent (unlikely in this case) but my money is the oven temperature - it seems low. I'd usually bake a cake at 350F. When baking a cake you first get a rise from the action of the leavening agents and the expansion of air and water vapor ...


3

I think what you'd need is actually a sugar-free hard candy recipe - something like isomalt, or erythritol, with additional sweetner. The crunch in butterfingers candy is actually thin thin sheets of sugar crystals, folded around, separated by and layered with peanut butter. There are a number of sweets that use the same basic principle, using fats keep ...


3

The question was about unsweetened ice cream. Yet, you are all mentioning how to make it sweet using other carbs, fake sweeteners, or natural sugars. The point is for it to be unsweetened. And yes, fruit and honey have sugar in them...but, I digress. I make unsweetened ice cream regularly. It can not be stored in the freezer, however. You have to make ...


3

I don't have a good suggestion for what to use, but at least I can give you some info on xanthan. Yes, syrup can take viscosity from an infinitesmal amount of xanthan gum. If you add 0.5% to 1% of the fluid's weight in xanthan, you get a pudding consistency. For a syrup-like viscosity, you need much less. But xanthan is not a sugar, and does not make a ...


3

First, I agree with Tarak'ha's suggestions because it looks like you're trying to keep things somewhat healthy. Since it looks like you're trying to make healthier brownies, I just wanted to mention yet another less heard of healthy fat replacement in baking: Finely shredded / pureed beetroot. I learned this trick from a show called "Cook Yourself Thin" for ...


3

In meringues sugar is important mainly for the final texture, much more so than for it's sweetening effect. Since Stevia is much sweeter than sugar, one would have to use far less in order to not ruin the taste. ("collectively, they give stevia 100 to 300 times the sweetness of sucrose") Yet even taking half as much normal sugar than the recipe calls for ...


3

The sugar in ice cream isn't just there for the taste, it also has an important effect on the texture. Ice cream isn't a pure compound, and doesn't have a single fixed melting point but a melting traject. The more dissolved solids (sugar) you have, the longer the melting traject of the ice cream. It also starts to melt at a lower temperature. That ...


3

Use a sugar substitute of your choice added after heating and cooling (all you need is for it to dissolve), in an amount meant to replace 3/4 cup of sugar, or just adjust it until it's as sweet as you'd like.


2

Sounds a bit like a paleo version of Anzac biscuits. If not, please don't bite my head off, but here's the recipe I follow, although I don't recall where I obtained it originally; Pre-heat oven to 150C 175g organic rolled oats 40g dessicated or flaked organic coconut 60g flaked or chopped almonds - or almond meal if preferred 2 1/2 tablespoons cold ...


2

There is a difference between not sweet, and no added sugar etc. I make a lot of icecream at home, but I rarely use sugar. I mostly make some kind of yoghurt ice cream, and I use fruit for flavor. Which brings me to: Icecream can be sweet without sugar Most fruits have a sweet taste, and if you use them in icecream it will be sweeter even without sugar. ...


2

IF avoiding sugars. I would avoid Wine altogether as it contains sugar naturally. Otherwise, you would probably be better off just creating real Sangria. One option, if you absolutely need an "non-sugar" option, would be to mix the wine with a fruity juice that is sugar-free. Also, not all wines are going to mix well, I would try to get a basic table red ...


1

I tend to use very little salt in cooking, and wouldn't add any directly to this recipe (and there would be none at all added to the tomatoes). There are a few things you could add that would contain a little salt (such as Worcester sauce, marmite, or even soy sauce - be sparing if you use any of these so they don't take over the flavour). What they have in ...


1

About a teaspoon of Balsamic vinegar would not only make the sauce less sweet, but will also add depth to the flavour of it, in my opinion. Another option, from my own recipe, is to add a splash of red vermouth after the meat is done, so it simmers with everything.


1

Simple way to avoid sodium and still have salty taste is use salt substitute. Personally I've tried using potassium chloride as substitute. It is less salty and more bitter than regular salt, but this makes it work even better for de-sweetening food. I heard a lot of good about using bitter salt as a salt substitute, too. Haven't tried it myself, but if ...


1

Eggnog can be easily adjusted for diabetics by removing as many carbs as possible. I recommend using heavy whipping cream and unsweetened almond milk, both of which have 1 or fewer net grams of carbs per serving. For a sweetener, I recommend using erythritol (or the brand name Swerve), as that is the only sweetener that I have come across that has no effects ...


1

There are recipes for various types of caramel using Xylitol, sometimes combined with a limited amount of real sugar (which would not make a sugar free but still a low sugar version). Since caramel seems to be a core ingredient in this confectionery, these recipes likely make a good starting point.


1

In India now we have Paan flavoured Ice Cream, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paan) which has both sweet and savoury flavours.


1

If you could grind fennel or cardamom seeds to the right consistency to get the right abrasive action and "bite" (please excuse the pun!), this would also have dental benefits. See: http://ijpsr.com/bft-article/effect-of-chewing-fennel-and-cardamom-seeds-on-dental-plaque-and-salivary-ph-a-randomized-controlled-trial/?view=fulltext


1

I found a patent application for Chewing gum possessing tooth cleaning effect and a teeth cleaning method. Paragraph 130 addresses polishing agents: Consequently, a polishing material can be any material that does not abrade dental enamel and dentine. Typical materials include silica gels and precipitates, aluminas, phosphates, and mixtures thereof. ...


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