Hot answers tagged

51

Looking up Shreddies, I found this site. It lists, in the ingredients Whole Grain Wheat (96%), Sugar, Invert Sugar Syrup, Barley Malt Extract, Salt, Molasses, Vitamins and Minerals (Niacin, Iron, Pantothenic Acid, Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, Riboflavin) There is no percentage for the sugar in the ingredients list. And the nutritional information says ...


46

Creating the Geode candy you have in the link should be relatively straight forward, but does require a little knowledge about how crystals form. First, let's look at what is probably going wrong by examining your two outcomes: or the whole thing turns completely solid You made glass candy. You cooled the solution so quickly that no crystals were ...


37

I suspect that 96g of whole grain goes into the recipe for 100g, along with 13g of sugar and some salt, vitamins, and flavouring ingredients. At that point there's at least 109g. Then it's formed and cooked, driving off at least 9g of water, getting down to 100g. I don't know in what form the whole wheat is added, but whole wheat flour has more than 20% ...


36

Making bread without sugar is nothing strange - I do so several times a week! The wheat flour (or whatever you're using) contains enzymes which, when you blend it with water, breaks down starch to sugars which fermenting agents such as yeast or lactobacilli can feed off. The Wikipedia page on sourdough has more info.


36

I assume, by sugar you mean sucrose. However, yeast actually prefers glucose and maltose, see nutritional requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and also proofing. Luckily, we get glucose and maltose "for free" from the flour, see this article on bread chemistry: Flour naturally contains both α- and β-amylases, which between them break down some of ...


30

You do not need sugar to make bread. The majority of traditional, rustic breads use just 4 ingredients - water, yeast, flour, and salt. Consequently, rising times are slower (usually resulting in better flavour) and the bread goes stale quicker (hence, for example, the French practice of buying fresh bread every day). Sugar softens bread by slowing gluten ...


29

Don't throw it away. Worst case you use up the mystery sweetener on yourself, and use a new pack of Stevia for your wife and anything you share. That's what I recommend if you're not convinced by my solution or don't have sensitive kitchen scales. At room temperature, sucrose (normal sugar) is very soluble in water: about 200 g of sugar will dissolve ...


27

Ants don't care about artificial sweeteners. Make two piles: one of your mystery sweet stuff and one of real sugar (as a control to make sure there are ants around). Maybe moisten them some or make syrup. Leave them outside somewhere you see ants. Then check them later. Carbohydrates (sugar) are fuel for all animals. Stevia has no food value. Ants ...


23

There are no similarities between the process of making caramel and making cookies. Pure caramel has one ingredient, sugar. This sugar is cooked on the stove and brought to a high temperature until it changes color. The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 340 °F (170 °C). As the sugar heats, the molecules break down and ...


21

This answer is specific to OP's situation, and doesn't apply for the general case where "getting it wrong" has fewer consequences. is there any surefire way to tell if this is Stevia and not sugar? No, there is no surefire way you can tell. Within the bounds of an everyday kitchen, and lay-person knowledge; there is no method by which you will be 100% ...


20

Most cocktails use sugar syrup (e.g. simple syrup with a water to sugar ratio of 1:1 or 1:2) instead of granulated sugar. This eliminates the need to dissolve the grains in - typically cold - liquids. When you consider powdered (confectioner's) sugar because of the smaller grain size, remember that they will most likely contain anti-caking agents like ...


20

Powdered sugar is, basically, just sugar, but with the grains ground to a fine dust. To be very precise, powdered sugar sometimes contains an anti-caking agent like corn starch to prevent clumping but as far as nutritional values go, treat it like ordinary sugar. So: Powdered sugar is no sugar alternative because it is simply sugar.


19

There are plenty of fermentable sugars in the flours commonly used in pizza making. Additional sugar is completely unnecessary.


19

a lot of recipes caramelize sugar in a simmering water. Calling the solution "simmering water" isn't a good characterization. The boiling point of pure water is 100C. But the boiling point rises as the concentration of sugar in the solution increases. Once you're above 75% or so, the boiling point increases significantly. For 90% sugar (still 10% water ...


18

Sugared bread is something mostly specific to the US. There might be a little sugar in European bread, but not much. From a personal opinion as a Belgian, I have to say that the few time I ate sugared bread (Harry's American bread), I found that it completely ruined the taste of the condiment on my bread, as well as make the bread less suitable to be used ...


17

A couple things for clarification. First, some have speculated that the percentages do not refer to true percentages. Assuming this is UK labeling, as in the link rumtscho noted, the 96% per UK regulations must refer to the amount per 100 grams of the product by weight (from 96.2 grams of whole wheat). It turns out I was wrong about this in some cases. ...


16

Yes and no. There isn't a point at which they will ever be pure caramel - the flour would alter the texture enough to prevent it from being "pure", not to mention the chocolate would burn before that point. It is possible to have enough sugar in the cookies that it can become caramelized, but this would happen with very flat cookies, in a thin batter, ...


16

IR thermometers are not accurate enough for sugar work. They make some assumptions (like reflectivity of the surface) which are not exactly met in real life. My way of making small amounts of sugar syrup is to use a small pot with a long handle. I have a 12 cm stainless steel one with a long handle that's very comfortable, and similar vessels exist in even ...


15

The math answer: 1/2 = 3/6 1/3 = 2/6 So (3/6) - (2/6) = 1/6 cups As 1 cup is 237 ml, 1/6 is about 40 ml. 40 ml is two tablespoons (15ml each) plus 2 teaspoons (5 ml each). To fill 1/3 to make 1/2 cup add 2 tblsp + 2 tsp. The lifehack answer: Dump the 1/3 of a cup into a 1/2 cup and fill it up.


14

You should use 'superfine' sugar, which is broken down much smaller so that it'll dissolve better in cold liquids. You can make your own by putting some sugar into a food processor and whizzing it around for a bit. You can also make a simple or heavy syrup, so you don't have to worry about sugar dissolving. Heavy syrup will keep longer in the fridge, as ...


14

There is no real difference between types of granulated, white sugar. The options you are likely to see are cane sugar and beet sugar. Granulated sugar from sugarcane is often considered "superior" to beet sugar by Americans, but the idea that cane sugar is in any way superior to beet sugar has no basis. Granulated beet sugar and granulated cane sugar are ...


14

Summary: Most types of sugar will absorb some heat as they dissolve. Commercial baked goods often use a type of "snow sugar," which is designed to be used on warm, moist foods without dissolving. It's likely that commercial doughnuts use a lot of dextrose in their "snow sugar," which requires four times as much heat to dissolve as the sucrose in normal ...


14

The question you are asking has no technological solution - you cannot put caramel on something wet and preventing from becoming wet. So you are looking at logistical solutions, and you have basically listed them already. For eating on premises, you keep the custard in the fridge and add the sugar and torch just before serving, as you mentioned. This is so ...


11

It is very simple, you just have to heat it long enough. It can even happen by accident :) The taste is a mixture of bitter and sour, while the smell component is mostly towards something burnt. Also, your assumption "because of the uncaramelized sugar mixed in the caramel" is incorrect, or at least incomplete. There usually is such sugar, but many of the ...


11

Wow, do not throw it away, especially if you have a scale or yeast handy. There are 2 easy methods to determine whether the unknown sweetener is sugar or not. Try fermenting unknown sweetener with yeast With the exception of lactose, yeast can feed on all "real" sugars, or at least the ones you'd normally keep in your kitchen. On the other hand, in all of ...


11

while all of the above answers are correct, I want to provide a perspective as a native Chinese. Rock sugar is better used (than granulated sugar) when you try to make dishes involving coloring the ingredient (by caramelization, dishes like braised pork belly (Hong Shao Rou need this step) mostly because of the shape difference. Rock sugar has less surface ...


10

Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down) Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky. Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar. In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and ...


10

This answer touches on the problem: Superfine sugar will dissolve too quickly and won't allow enough air to be incorporated. Powdered or superfine sugar will still give you the same sweetness property as the granulated sugar. However, the step of creaming butter and (granulated) sugar is not just for mixing. It also incorporates some air into the fat; a ...


10

Brown sugar is just white granulated sugar with molasses added. Dark brown sugar just has more molasses than light brown sugar. Coffee shops often have turbinado sugar, a common brand is Sugar in the Raw. Turbinado sugar is brown because it is less refined than white sugar. The turbinado sugar is less "wet" than brown sugar, so it will dissolve somewhat ...


9

"Atomized glucose" seems to be primarily a French product, derived from spray-drying glucose syrup. Glucose syrup is best known in America as corn syrup (e.g. light Karo, not HFCS), and is mostly, but not entirely, glucose. Dextrose is pure crystalline glucose. They are not exactly the same ingredient, and probably not interchangeable in fussy recipes.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible