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51

Looking up Shreddies, I found this site. It lists, in the ingredients Whole Grain Wheat (96%), Sugar, Invert Sugar Syrup, Barley Malt Extract, Salt, Molasses, Vitamins and Minerals (Niacin, Iron, Pantothenic Acid, Folic Acid, Vitamin B6, Riboflavin) There is no percentage for the sugar in the ingredients list. And the nutritional information says ...


37

I suspect that 96g of whole grain goes into the recipe for 100g, along with 13g of sugar and some salt, vitamins, and flavouring ingredients. At that point there's at least 109g. Then it's formed and cooked, driving off at least 9g of water, getting down to 100g. I don't know in what form the whole wheat is added, but whole wheat flour has more than 20% ...


17

A couple things for clarification. First, some have speculated that the percentages do not refer to true percentages. Assuming this is UK labeling, as in the link rumtscho noted, the 96% per UK regulations must refer to the amount per 100 grams of the product by weight (from 96.2 grams of whole wheat). It turns out I was wrong about this in some cases. ...


16

IR thermometers are not accurate enough for sugar work. They make some assumptions (like reflectivity of the surface) which are not exactly met in real life. My way of making small amounts of sugar syrup is to use a small pot with a long handle. I have a 12 cm stainless steel one with a long handle that's very comfortable, and similar vessels exist in even ...


16

a lot of recipes caramelize sugar in a simmering water. Calling the solution "simmering water" isn't a good characterization. The boiling point of pure water is 100C. But the boiling point rises as the concentration of sugar in the solution increases. Once you're above 75% or so, the boiling point increases significantly. For 90% sugar (still 10% water ...


14

The question you are asking has no technological solution - you cannot put caramel on something wet and preventing from becoming wet. So you are looking at logistical solutions, and you have basically listed them already. For eating on premises, you keep the custard in the fridge and add the sugar and torch just before serving, as you mentioned. This is so ...


11

while all of the above answers are correct, I want to provide a perspective as a native Chinese. Rock sugar is better used (than granulated sugar) when you try to make dishes involving coloring the ingredient (by caramelization, dishes like braised pork belly (Hong Shao Rou need this step) mostly because of the shape difference. Rock sugar has less surface ...


8

I often come across bread labeled "100 percent whole wheat." I've always taken this to mean that the grain is 100 percent whole wheat, rather than that whole wheat constitutes 100 percent of the ingredients. Obviously there are other ingredients in bread, like salt, yeast, and water. I suspect that a similar thing is going on with this cereal. As you point ...


8

Recipes that call for water to be added to the sugar for making a caramel do so to help all the sugar melt, by dissolving some or all of it in the water. This prevents premature crystallization of the sugar. When you keep heating the mixture, all the water will evaporate, at which point the temperature of the (now pure) molten sugar will rise above 100 °C ...


8

As sugar dissolves extremely readily when damp, let alone wet, you could just manually pick out the clumps. If it's not clumped, it didn't get wet. Soap itself wouldn't travel any further than the water through the sugar, but the smell may. If the soap was perfumed, just getting the clumps out may not be sufficient. If you can still smell it afterwards, ...


6

Well, after this came up in another question and after realizing data on this was hard to find online, I pulled out my graduated cylinder and tried it myself. As noted in comments, measuring sugar by volume is very inexact. I found that simply by pouring sugar into the graduated cylinder and tapping it, I could start with about 110mL and tap it down to ...


6

No, it doesn't, really. Once it is dissolved, it behaves exactly the same. Eaters won't know the difference when eating the finished product. So, tastewise, there is no special reason to use rock sugar. This answer assumes that you are adding sugar to a polar solvent (water, broth, alcohol...). It doesn't cover techniques of adding the sugar to oil or ...


5

If these are canned whole sweet potato, or pieces/slices in syrup or sugar then yes, you can remove the sugar by rinsing the pieces in water. Whole pieces of sweet potato don't absorb sugar, it stays on the surface. The sugar is there as a preservative, believe it or not, not to make the potatoes sweeter. They could use salt but then that would clash with ...


4

First, be aware that substituting brown for white sugar will result in a different product. Brown sugar has molasses flavors, and absorbs water differently from white sugar, so both the taste and texture of the final baked goods will be different and no amount of adjusting quantities will change this. With that in mind, 1 cup of packed brown sugar, ...


4

As you suggest, most nougat recipes require the sugar syrup to be brought to specific temperatures (typically "hard ball" or "soft crack" stage, see for example this page for details of the stages of cooking sugar). By that time, any water that you started out with (in your case in the form of rose water) has boiled off. Simply bringing the mixture up to a ...


4

On King Arthur's site, they talk about liquid sweeteners. One of their comparisons between the different forms is water content/acidity. Maple syrup's water content/acidity: 34%, mildly acidic (less acidic than honey). This led me to look up water content and acidity impacts on baking. The Cake blog did a comparison of cakes based on level of acid used. The ...


4

Yes, the lack of volume will be a problem. Sugar makes up much of the structure of a cake. But since Stevia is 300 times sweetener than sugar, you'll end up using 300 times less. In addition the bulking issue, sugar plays many other roles in cake: it tenderizes, retains moisture, and contributes to browning. A sugar-free cake may be disappointing no matter ...


3

Brown sugar is equivalent to sugar plus molasses. If you mix brown sugar and (white) sugar, you'll get slightly brown sugar. Any benefits you were expecting from the (white) sugar, you'll still get. Any benefits you were expecting from the molasses, you'll get less of.


3

In China, highly refined granulated sugar like we find in US is somehow uncommon. The most common form of sugar is soft white sugar that is less pure and contains a few percent of syrup and other sugar family substance. These imperfections sometimes affect cooking. Rock sugar has a relatively larger market in China than the rest of the world for precisely ...


3

I am coming rather late to this party, but here's my answer: Caramel made by heating sugar in fat (oil or butter) will never completely harden like caramel made in water or just melting sugar and will get very soft again when reheated. Also, it is much easier to control the color of the caramel when made in fat. In Chinese cuisine there is a process called &...


3

The answer is yes, sugars (including glucose) will affect the crumb of your bread. It will diminish the gluten formation and make the bread softer, it will cause the yeast to be more active since the yeast eats sugar (so the bread may rise more and/or faster), it will help the crust brown (the Maillard reaction is the browning of sugar and proteins), and it ...


3

No, there is no standard categorization on these lines. You are just creating a personal categorization in your head (which is not a bad thing in any way - that's how everybody's mind works) and you are attaching an association to brightness/darkness which is mostly personal, but might be close enough to a shared experience/language use that other people ...


3

This will definitely require some experimentation on your part. As a starting point, I recommend comparing the sugar content of the fruit to the sugar content of sugar. Below, I use dates as an example. 48 grams of dates (approximately 2 dates) contains 32 grams of sugar (source) 48 grams of sugar contains 48 grams of sugar (source: common sense) So dates ...


2

60F that is what you need to remember. Butter need to reach 60F before you can start creaming with sugar. Colder than that is too hard. 65 is ideal, but when the hand mixer works the butter is going to get some heat. Once it is hotter than 68F you have reached point of no return. It is now waste


2

After coating in citric acid/sugar mixture, spread your gummies out on parchment in a single layer and not touching. Allow them to air dry for 12-24 hours, flipping once or twice. This step allows the moisture to desiccate and will result in a firm, semi crunchy, crystallized coating.


2

According to this, it is less sweet than regular white sugar which can be used if rock sugar is not available. Even if it can/ has a brown/golden-ish color, it is not brown sugar which has a more distinct flavor.


2

My wife uses whipped cream frosting, which is quite smooth and soft. Basically it is cream-cheese frosting with whipped cream added in, and then beaten with a wire whisk beater (easiest to do in a cake-mixer). A basic recipe is: 8 ounces cream cheese 1 cup powdered sugar 2 3/4 cups heavy cream, cold Instructions: Place the cream cheese and powdered ...


2

My answer is based on experience;I’m not sure of the underlying science. Rock sugar is not as sweet as granulated sugar. It has a broader, less intense sweetness which works well in savory dishes. It lacks a sweet “punch” which is more suited to desserts. I use the white kind, though I’m sure the yellow/brown sort has some additional flavor.


2

I use IR thermometers all the time , the are very accurate. I use them for fudge, aquariums, ponds, inside and outside temperatures ( you need an appropriate solid target) skin temperature, etc.. I have checked them against electronic immersion thermometers, all good. There are different temperatures in boiling sugar- foam, edge of pan , etc, use some ...


2

Demerara sugar has a syrupy flavor which is between light muscovado sugar and granulated sugar, I would substitute a 50/50 mix of golden granulated and light muscovado sugar. As you have some demerara you could do a small amount of 50/50 mix and taste test, adjusting to get the right balance. You could also put in straight light muscovado if you wanted a ...


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