Hot answers tagged

19

a lot of recipes caramelize sugar in a simmering water. Calling the solution "simmering water" isn't a good characterization. The boiling point of pure water is 100C. But the boiling point rises as the concentration of sugar in the solution increases. Once you're above 75% or so, the boiling point increases significantly. For 90% sugar (still 10% water ...


8

The short answer is that it's probably safe, but here are some considerations: What Does Yeast Do? Yeast eats sugar and converts it to carbon dioxide (also alcohol, but that's not a consideration in most bread baking). "Sugar" doesn't necessary mean sucrose (table sugar) - it also means fructose and glucose, like you'd find in honey or agave syrup....


8

As sugar dissolves extremely readily when damp, let alone wet, you could just manually pick out the clumps. If it's not clumped, it didn't get wet. Soap itself wouldn't travel any further than the water through the sugar, but the smell may. If the soap was perfumed, just getting the clumps out may not be sufficient. If you can still smell it afterwards, ...


8

Recipes that call for water to be added to the sugar for making a caramel do so to help all the sugar melt, by dissolving some or all of it in the water. This prevents premature crystallization of the sugar. When you keep heating the mixture, all the water will evaporate, at which point the temperature of the (now pure) molten sugar will rise above 100 °C ...


6

That recipe is merely chocolate-topped, so you will find better, probably using cocoa powder. However that may still not go far enough. I have tried to make chocolate chip flapjack by using dark chocolate chips and stirring into the melted mixture before baking. I did this after the adding the oats and after a bit of cooling, with as little stirring as ...


5

If these are canned whole sweet potato, or pieces/slices in syrup or sugar then yes, you can remove the sugar by rinsing the pieces in water. Whole pieces of sweet potato don't absorb sugar, it stays on the surface. The sugar is there as a preservative, believe it or not, not to make the potatoes sweeter. They could use salt but then that would clash with ...


4

On King Arthur's site, they talk about liquid sweeteners. One of their comparisons between the different forms is water content/acidity. Maple syrup's water content/acidity: 34%, mildly acidic (less acidic than honey). This led me to look up water content and acidity impacts on baking. The Cake blog did a comparison of cakes based on level of acid used. The ...


4

Yes, the lack of volume will be a problem. Sugar makes up much of the structure of a cake. But since Stevia is 300 times sweetener than sugar, you'll end up using 300 times less. In addition the bulking issue, sugar plays many other roles in cake: it tenderizes, retains moisture, and contributes to browning. A sugar-free cake may be disappointing no matter ...


4

As you suggest, most nougat recipes require the sugar syrup to be brought to specific temperatures (typically "hard ball" or "soft crack" stage, see for example this page for details of the stages of cooking sugar). By that time, any water that you started out with (in your case in the form of rose water) has boiled off. Simply bringing the mixture up to a ...


4

Meat/fish do not contain significant carbohydrate - glycogen is the sugar found in meat, but it is stored in the liver, which DOES contain carbohydrate, though not necessarily sufficiently for liver to be perceived as sweet. Fish tastes sweet because of free amino acids. Free amino acids are not to be confused with protein, which is tasteless. Protein is ...


3

This will definitely require some experimentation on your part. As a starting point, I recommend comparing the sugar content of the fruit to the sugar content of sugar. Below, I use dates as an example. 48 grams of dates (approximately 2 dates) contains 32 grams of sugar (source) 48 grams of sugar contains 48 grams of sugar (source: common sense) So dates ...


3

I am coming rather late to this party, but here's my answer: Caramel made by heating sugar in fat (oil or butter) will never completely harden like caramel made in water or just melting sugar and will get very soft again when reheated. Also, it is much easier to control the color of the caramel when made in fat. In Chinese cuisine there is a process called &...


3

You make small amounts the same way you make large amounts: dry or wet, doesn't matter, take your preference. The problems you have are related not to the method, but to the wrong vessel. For example, for the dry method, you have to have the sugar neither too thick, nor too thin. For small amounts of caramel, you have to go with a small pot, possibly go down ...


2

While the other answers are right, it should be pointed out that caramelisation does not happen at 160°C - not only at that temperature, at least. Thermal decomposition happens as both a factor of temperature and time. In fact, it is possible for sugar to undergo thermal decomposition well under 160°C: Stella Parks over at Serious Eats does it at 150°C, and ...


2

Unfortunately, no, at least not if you want to use the end product as milk. As this answer to a previous question of yours suggests, once the sugar is dissolved in a liquid or purée, there is no way to get it out. You can technically separate the sugar from the liquid (See this question and its answers on the Chemistry stack exchange) but I don't believe ...


2

I tried to make nougat for the first time. The consistency was way too soft. I left it few hours. I just did not want to waste all those ingredients. I pour the way too soft nougat in a glass bowl and add a little bit of corn flour. I put the glass bowl over a pot with boiling water and stir and stir and stir. It reached a nice chewy consistency, and I ...


2

This is simply the nature of erythritol. In my testing, I wasn't able to create any kind of viscous, syrup-like consistency by mixing it with water and heating it to reduce; rather, it would always form a hard crystalline structure. This most likely has to do with the fact that, unlike regular sugar (sucrose), erythritol is not hygroscopic at all. (Things ...


2

These are technical terms that are meaningful only in the original Thai. The English translations are meaningless and have no relevance to cooking. http://www.ratchakitcha.soc.go.th/DATA/PDF/2552/E/132/15.PDF So you should say 'น้ำตาลทรายขาว' ('white sugar') and 'น้ำตาลทรายขาวบรสิทธุ' ('refined sugar') น้ำตาลทรายขาว is further divided into 3 classes. This ...


2

This is candy. It is sugar cooked to a particular concentration with other things mixed in for texture and flavor. Low sugar candy is like low fat ice cream- a contradiction. If you were to reduce the sugar in half compared to the other ingredients the product would have a harder time holding together. It wouldn't take too far before it was simply nut butter....


2

You will find that adding sugar to some recipes is controversial and highly subjective. Me, I almost never add sugar in situations like yours. But sugar can do something valuable: decrease bitterness. I knew an Italian woman many years ago that made the best "gravy" (tomato sauce) and her secret? A pinch or two of sugar, she claimed it made her ...


2

If you need to maintain a certain temperature over time, this is the domain of sous vide cookers. They are typically made for proteins, so if you cannot find one that goes to 90 C, you can use a homemade setup instead (controller + drop-in heater + small pump). It will serve you much better than any purpose-made device, unless you can find something exactly ...


1

In theory you should be able to replace the sugar with a liquid form. The purpose of sugar in meringue is to stabilize the foam generated by the whipping. It does this by preventing the foam from drying out and collapsing as the structure becomes weaker from a lack of water. Hence anything that can retain the water will help. The one major difficulty that ...


1

I would say that the "thicker milk" advice of the other answer is not bad. Instead of using evaporated milk, it might be mich easier to make it with powdered milk. Beyond that, I wouldn't try to do whatever a commercial producer is doing. Their recipes tend to be very precisely tuned, created with a lot of effort and know-how, and require steps and ...


1

No, there is no specific temperature you need to reach. Once the sugar is dissolved (which will happen well below boiling temperature) you’re done.


1

Blackstrap molasses isn't exactly just light molasses with less sugar. It's been cooked for longer during the refining process, leading to more Maillard browning. But that's not a major effect. If you add some sugar and a bit of water to blackstrap molasses, you'll basically have light(er) molasses.


1

If you are asking about butter creamed with sugar, you can do this. I would place in an airtight container, maybe with a piece of plastic or wax paper on top, and refrigerate. It should be good for a couple of weeks. Of course, you will need to bring to room temperature to soften before use.


1

This document seemed like it might answer your question as it talks about the temperature it takes to crystallize supersaturated sucrose solutions in the presence of fructose glucose and corn syrup. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/242257775_Crystallization_of_the_supersaturated_sucrose_solutions_in_the_presence_of_fructose_glucose_and_corn_syrup ...


1

No, you can't do it. Marzipan has a smooth paste consistency. Granulated sugar is not suitable, you'd end up with a preferred mixture of sugar and ... almond crumbs? Without a grinding implement, you couldn't reduce the almonds to the needed consistency either.


1

While I have never tried this dish (it looks delicious though!), I did some research and think I have some suggestions on veganising it. Watching how it's cooked (in some videos I found here), it reminded me a little of 'Dutch Baby Pancakes'. These pancakes don't use a raising agent like baking powder, but rather rely on cooking at a very high heat and with ...


1

..... A distinct option would be to make little sugar cookie cups to place the nougat chunks in. I wouldn't completely enclose the nougat in dough and bake it, but cookie bowls could make a pleasant, customizable delivery system if other options are dissatisfactory. Just take a stiff, decorator-approved cookie dough, portion, and with a thumb or measuring ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible