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-1

Every oil, whether flavored or not, has a smoke point. Even the same oils with different branding may have slightly different smoke points. The only way to really tell what a particular oil's smoke point is, is to heat the oil TO that smoke point and determine the temperature that it is at when it starts to smoke. You can use a little oil in a small pan to ...


0

In China, highly refined granulated sugar like we find in US is somehow uncommon. The most common form of sugar is soft white sugar that is less pure and contains a few percent of syrup and other sugar family substance. These imperfections sometimes affect cooking. Rock sugar has a relatively larger market in China than the rest of the world for precisely ...


1

You can toast your sugar. Stella Parks on Serious Eats and in her cookbook Bravetart explains that toasted sugar undergoes thermal decomposition that make a more complex, less sweet flavor and (importantly to your question) is lower in the glycemic index: Not only does toasted sugar taste less sweet, it has less sucrose, fewer calories, and a lower ...


0

Your best option is to replace the sugar with something which will give similar properties to the sugar. You're best finding a low sugar recipe instead of trying to adapt your current one. I'm not a huge fan of sweeteners, especially for baking, but honey can be a good alternative. You usually need a lower quantity in weight (it's more sweet) and it tends ...


9

while all of the above answers are correct, I want to provide a perspective as a native Chinese. Rock sugar is better used (than granulated sugar) when you try to make dishes involving coloring the ingredient (by caramelization, dishes like braised pork belly (Hong Shao Rou need this step) mostly because of the shape difference. Rock sugar has less surface ...


0

All of these are fine methods. Over the years, since I don’t use brown sugar so often, I just use granulated sugar and add some molasses to it. then I never have to worry about my bag ofbrown sugar turning into masonry. Its a nice experiment to add molasses to sugar and mix it and see it magically become brown sugar. This will also help you determine ...


1

My answer is based on experience;I’m not sure of the underlying science. Rock sugar is not as sweet as granulated sugar. It has a broader, less intense sweetness which works well in savory dishes. It lacks a sweet “punch” which is more suited to desserts. I use the white kind, though I’m sure the yellow/brown sort has some additional flavor.


4

No, it doesn't, really. Once it is dissolved, it behaves exactly the same. Eaters won't know the difference when eating the finished product. So, tastewise, there is no special reason to use rock sugar. This answer assumes that you are adding sugar to a polar solvent (water, broth, alcohol...). It doesn't cover techniques of adding the sugar to oil or ...


1

According to this, it is less sweet than regular white sugar which can be used if rock sugar is not available. Even if it can/ has a brown/golden-ish color, it is not brown sugar which has a more distinct flavor.


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