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66

Clean your hands before you eat. Often, you will be given a hot towel for the purpose. Return the towel to the server neatly folded. It is fine to eat sushi with your hand, as long as there is rice with each piece of fish. Sashimi (sliced fish not prepared with rice) should only be eaten with chopsticks. If you sit at the sushi bar, feel free to converse ...


45

Unless if it's labelled "sushi-grade" or "sashimi-grade", they probably don't freeze it deeply enough, so I wouldn't recommend it as-is. This is because of Salmon's high risk of parasites. However, you can turn it into sushi-grade fish if you have a freezer that reaches -20°C, and don't mind waiting. Here in British Columbia, the government has Sushi Safety ...


18

That item in the bottom right is Tamago nigiri, a slice of omelette on top of seasoned rice.


17

Even with the same fish, sashimi and ceviche are very different dishes: Sashimi is sliced, raw fish that is in its natural state. Note the glossy, translucent nature of the slices: Sashimi is also just the fish, although the plate may have additional garnishes. Ceviche is technically uncooked, but has been marinated in citrus juice which coagulates ...


17

That is an interesting idea, but I would not recommend it. It is true that UV light is able to kill microorganisms, and it has been used to treat water for quite some time now. It has also been used to treat some types of juices, and is even used in the food industry (factories). It is an alternative to pasteurization, since it provides an alternative way ...


16

It sounds like you were served sushi rolls as finger food, and if chopsticks are not provided, then you are expected to eat it like the other finger food, with your fingers. There isn't really etiquette involved as this isn't a restaurant setting. If you are having a sit-down meal, and there are no chopsticks provided, you could always ask for a pair. ...


16

An info-graphic I found on the topic a little while ago that I believe answers your question quite well: Source: iLoveCoffee.JP In terms of etiquette is it alright to eat sushi by hand? If relevant I'm in North America. According to the info-graphic there is no wrong way to eat sushi as long as it makes it into your belly. I would agree with this ...


15

If you can't find details then it's pretty likely it is not sushi safe, and I would certainly make that assumption. Sushi safe freezing would add extra costs and Ikea is all about low costs. Plus, it wouldn't be necessary if the fish is going to be cooked or cured, and that's how most want to use it. If it was sushi safe I'd expect to see it clearly marked ...


13

Sushi does not require fish, sushi is the style of rice preparation (rice, salt, a little rice vinegar, occasionally some kombu). So long as you have the correct preparation of rice, you technically have some form of sushi (you could just throw it in a bowl with some additions on top and have a type of sushi called chirashizushi). Second, there is no such ...


12

That's not really true in any meaningful way, and has nothing to do with sushi. It sounds like the author was just trying to make it sound scandalous to attract attention. It's a really, really sensationalized version of something true about at least some species of shrimp. They're essentially all born male, so before they can reproduce, naturally, some of ...


12

It's hard to say exactly which thing was the issue. Rice sticks to itself because of starch on the surface. As Joe pointed out, if it's actually still wet, it's not going to stick. It doesn't get sticky until it's dry enough for the starch to be sticky instead of just starchy water. But even if you did let it cook/dry properly, the extra washing and ...


12

According to Still Tasty (a site that looks at USDA, CDC and FDA data), nori lasts 2-4 months in the pantry and 4-6 months in the fridge. Also it says: Store in airtight glass or plastic container or in sealed plastic bag. Refrigerate to extend shelf life. Still, nori is completely dried. I imagine that the concern beyond that time frame is staleness, ...


12

He brushes soy sauce on it, because he knows how much is sufficient to season each nigiri. Actually not just any soy sauce, but nikiri: A good sushi chef adds all the flavors the sushi needs before he hands it to the customer. He mixes his own sauce and uses it behind the sushi bar. This sauce is called nikiri. you can see him brushing it here: ...


11

Rinsing rice Simple - rinse off the extra starch so it's not too sticky. This isn't magic. You're just getting rid of some starch before you go on to the next step. Some people advocate soaking the rice here as well. It's perfectly possible to make sushi rice without doing that, though, just rinsing. The soaking just helps make it easier to get the layer of ...


11

Most seafood counters will sell you small vacuum sealed portions of frozen fish. The fish is often frozen on the ship where it is caught and so will be fresher than even if you bought it at the dock. The freezing will also kill any parasites and is the only prerequisite for the label "sushi grade". See this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" ...


11

Partial answer, but here are some important facts before someone gets hurt: Germicidal UV (UV-C) lamps are NOT the same as blacklight/anti-counterfeit/tanning (UV-A/UV-B) lamps. Parasites and microbes are two distinct risks with raw fish, and need different measures. Something (the bulk of the food, or packaging around it, or material used to protect skin ...


10

The traditional knife for sushi and sashimi is the yanagi sashimi. It features a long blade (approx 10in or 270mm) that has a chisel ground blade which is often hollow ground on the back, called urasaki. The long blade allows you to cut thin slices in one continuous motion so that you don't you don't have slashes marks from changing direction. There are ...


9

With fish, you have two safety concerns: parasites and bacteria. Freezing gets rid of parasites. It does not kill bacteria. You need heat to kill bacteria, that's why officially, food is only considered safe after being cooked to a specific temperature. Eating thawed uncooked fish is officially unsafe, and if you tried to sell it to people, the FDA would ...


9

The biggest concern with fish caught in the wild is the presence of parasites. You'll have to look up which species of parasite are present in the species of fish that you wish to use, and treat it accordingly. Tapeworm is common in salmon, and several other varieties of fish have various parasites capable of infecting a human host. Most sites I've seen ...


9

Yes, it is true. Fish other than tuna must be frozen in the US to be called sushi grade. Only sushi grade fish can be sold raw in restaurants in most (if not all) jurisdictions. Freezing kills parasites that are common in fish. The FDA recommends that fish for raw consumption be frozen first, but state and local jurisdictions make and enforce the law. My ...


8

I assume you're making normal maki (nori side out) and not California rolls. Are you leaving a 1/2 inch or so of blank nori (no rice) on the outside edge (the edge that you roll last)? If you slightly wet the bare edge of the nori with a little water on your finger it should help it stick together.


8

As I explained in another question recently, there is no meaningful answer to this. There is no way to make the prediction "you have a X percent chance of infection per parasite infested meal". Instead of predicting it mathematically, we could feed people infected fish and measure it, but as far as I am aware, no ethical board will approve that experiment. ...


8

At the sushi belt restaurant I worked at the cut rolls are taken off the conveyor at closing time and the remaining staff takes home whatever is wanted, in the morning the leftovers are disposed of.


7

Green fruit leather makes a good substitute for nori in dessert "sushi" rolls, if you're going for something that reminds people of sushi without being creepily realistic. (I recently made a variation of these dessert sliders for Independence Day and they were a little too realistic for people).


7

Because you know you have previously frozen the fish. A lot of shop bought "fresh" fish is likely to have been frozen and defrosted, before sale. Often there is legislation about freezing fish if it is to be eaten raw. Note that home freezers may not be as effective as commercial freezers and blast freezers so you may need to keep the fish frozen ...


6

In fact, there is some precedent for this. 黒酢, romanized kurozu, is used in sushi at a a Tokyo restaurant called Kyo-zan, which claims to be the originator of the black vinegar sushi style. It would likely be considered a novelty in Japan, but black vinegar was super-trendy about 6-8 years ago in Japan and all sorts of new uses, including sweetened, ...


6

I had similar stuggles at first. Sharpness is first, test it on your thumb nail - it should have a decent bite. Second water, I dip my blade in water for a roll, not each piece, the other is when you dampen the nori to seal it, don't overwet it. Then, if possible, allow it to sit for a bit, maybe 15-30 seconds, with the sealed area on the bottom, that will ...


6

As everyone has said, assuming the nori is dry enough to begin with, the problem is moisture getting into the nori from the rice. But the problem might not be just moisture transferring because you let it sit too long, but rather that the rice itself is too moist. The drying step in making sushi rice is critical, and if you under-dry your rice, you'll have ...


6

I think the issue is that your nori will get soggy if you make the rolls in advance and store them overnight. Nigirizushi may be a better bet for making ahead. Chirashizushi is an older style of sushi which is essentially a bowl of the sushi rice, with the garnishes either mixed in or on top. It should be well amenable to advance preparation.


6

According to a few sushi websites, red shell sushi is known as arc shell, akaki or akagai sushi. It is a type of clam that gets its red color from lots of hemoglobin in its flesh. One source Another source And the green stuff is definitely nori.


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