8

If you want to do as much ahead of time as possible you have a couple of choices. You can definitely peel the sweet potatoes the day before and store them under water, but I wouldn't recommend slicing them. If they are sliced thinly enough for gratin they're going to absorb a lot of water which will ruin the flavour. You can make the cream etc. mix up the ...


7

Edit: If cooking longer softens the potatoes, then this isn't what's happening. In that case, well, you just need to cook longer. The main variable is probably temperature (maybe the pot isn't actually all hot for all 30-45 minutes), followed by variations in cut size and in the firmness of the original potatoes. But the rest could apply to some readers too! ...


7

My parents stored them for months. Sort them removing any damaged or bruised ones and eat those so that you are only storing ones that are not likely to rot quickly. Get a large box - even a cardboard box. Put a layer of fine sand, place the sweet potatoes then cover with sand and put in another layer. Do it gently so you don't bruise any. Exclude light,...


6

I used to cook plenty of purple sweet potatoes when I was living in africa:) Sounds like you maybe cooked them too long... They can be extremely tasty, sweet with a "perfumy" hint if you are lucky. They are best boiled with the skin on like you did and peeled afterwards (as the taste is preserved better that way). As for cooking time it really depends on ...


6

The theories that have come out in comments are most likely right on. Cast iron is special in how well it retains heat. Give cast iron ample preheating time, and you can drop in cold food without a significant drop in the temperature of the pan. That equals crispy. Even a pretty good and heavy non-stick pan is not going to give sweet potatoes the kind of ...


5

It depends on what you mean by "yam". Once upon a time, in the deep south of the US, there was a tuber known as the sweet potato, and it was good. And then one particular grower decided to sell theirs under the trade name "yam" to get better marketing recognition. This lead to some folks in the US calling sweet potatoes by the name yam, especially in the ...


5

Assuming a typical 1200 W to 1400 W microwave For gold (skin and interior) sweet potato around 4 to 5 minutes per 300 g (large first size) For purple (skin, and cream interior) sweet potato around 5 to 6 minutes per 300 g Allow at least a minute sitting time before cutting or serving to allow for an even cook


5

Speaking as someone who's had to prep ahead two garbage barrels of sweet potatoes for a giant gumbo event: If you're just peeling them a few hours ahead, then just hold them whereever. Unlike russet potatoes, sweet potatoes (especially garnet yams) do not turn brown or lose texture on exposure to air. If you're going to be holding them for a couple days, ...


5

Freezing fries opens up their texture and makes them more fluffy. This is helpful for regular fries or sweet potato fries. Sweet potatoes have too much sugar and not enough starch to crisp up on their own. The only crispy sweet potato fries I have ever made- or eaten- were coated in starch to provide the crispiness. While I haven't tried this exact recipe- ...


5

Thickness is important and there are different strategies for dealing with different thicknesses. But if you're having a problem getting them dry and crisp in the center before the exterior browns too much, there are a few standard suggestions. In order of complexity/extra work: Make sure you're frying at an optimal temperature. You might try varying a ...


4

Since sweet potatoes are usually classified by the color of the interior flesh, most parts of the world would call these white sweet potatoes. I think the easiest way to use these is to bake or to slice into half-inch thick circles, steam or boil about 20 min. After the initial cooking, you can also puree them with egg and coconut milk then bake similar to ...


4

These look a lot like some varieties of Japanese and Korean sweet potatoes, which often have purple skin and white flesh. I've found that they are drier and maybe starchier than orange sweet potatoes. They are hard to roast as they tend to dry out, but steaming or simmering in water work well, as does frying. If you search around for Japanese or Korean sweet ...


4

I peel and cook sweet potatoes with butter or oleo in a crock pot, about a half pound for 6-8 pounds of sweet potatoes, then use an electric mixer to pull out most of the strings - mix for a few minutes, lift up the mixer to spin off the sweet potatoes, turn it off and wash the strings off. Do that until only a small amount of strings are collected. Then to ...


4

Generally, the storage of sweet potatoes is similar to that of actual potatoes. Keep them in a cool, dark, dry place. Let them breathe (i.e. not in a plastic bag). Your results may depend on the weather (temperature and humidity), but I live where it's hot and humid, and sweet potatoes will easily last two weeks. This is where potatoes may last only about a ...


4

It seems that the best answer to your needs will be making a treacle. It may be challenging to do it with yams, it's typically done with less starchy plants. But I don't think it's impossible, it should be worth a try. Making a treacle basically involves taking a fruit juice, and slowly evaporating and caramelizing it. So, your first step will be to ...


4

Hi Lisa and welcome to Seasoned Advice! What you don't want is a thin pan. You will run the risk of burning, especially on the bottom. But it's not all bad news. Cast iron is thick and while it will take longer to heat up than a thin pan, it will provide a more even heat. Another thing to consider is that a dark pan usually cooks a little quicker (...


3

This depends a bit on the kind of result you are aiming for, generally speaking most people struggle to keep their sweet potatoes "in shape" and prevent disintegrating: For a slightly textured result, cooking your peeled and cubed sweet potatoes long enough should suffice, just make sure you have enough liquid in your dish and stir every now and then to ...


3

This is a common technique and should work well. It is important that you dry the fries thoroughly before adding them to the oil, otherwise it will boil out of the pan. If you have the time, you can lay the fries on a rack and place in the fridge for a couple of hours, which dehydrates the surface nicely. If not, pat them dry with lots of kitchen paper.


3

Ziggy's Potato Cutters will handle sweet potatoes...they are harder on the blade but it does a fine job. www.ribbonfries.biz


3

I have the Progressive International Jumbo Potato Cutter and it works well for sweet potato fries. The product spec for them lists "Yams" which are sometimes what sweet potatoes are called in the U.S. (technically, yes, yams are different but real yams are not often available in the U.S.). The LEM Products Commercial French Fry Cutter specifically lists ...


3

The purple skin sweet potatoes generally takes shorter time to boil in water that the white skin ones. You will find that it takes roughly the same amount of times as the golden skin potatoes which is roughly 15 minutes. They generally always becomes mushy once cooked by boiling. If you intend to pan fried or grill it, just let it boil for about 10 ...


3

This would be a great job for an immersion blender. Consider it a great excuse to buy a really handy gadget :) On Amazon you can find good ones for as little as $20 or you can spend over $100 for all of the bells and whistles.


3

I would also cut down on the "Full Basket" to lessen the Oil Temp Recovery. Try just a few handfuls at a time to keep the temp above 325'F. Frying time per batch should only be between 1 - 2 minutes.


3

Based on everything you provided in your question, the best thing to do is for you to do at least a series of timed trials and ideally timed trials at different temperatures. There is not enough to suggest a cooking time. As for temperature, you already have a range. While I do not have an answer to your question on cooking time, this is what I would do ...


3

Okay, after looking around a bit, I think the proper description of the sweet potato in your picture is 'pithy'. And I saw some pics where this condition had progressed much further than it had in yours. It seems that what causes this is temperatures too high during the storage time. I found references to this in several places. From the University of ...


3

The above recipe is valid but tedious. Try recipe below without the freezing part. Sweet potatoes do need a coating for crispness to replicate the double fry method achieved with potatoes. This recipe is for 2 pounds of sweet potatoes. If making more, make more soda bath as needed. The simpler method is to only peel and cut them when you are ready to ...


2

There are many varieties of sweet potato that have quite different cooking times Many cultures have diverse ideas of what "done" is, some have it quite firm, some have it mushy In general for your average sized sweet potato you should only need 50% to 75% of potato cooking time using the same method and weight


2

Livingston, California's sweet potato packing sheds store sweet potatoes for up to a year. Each year's crop is harvested from late August into early October. They are kept in the dark, in either 20 pound bins or 1,000 pound bins, in dry warehouses with temperatures of about 55 - 59 degrees Fahrenheit. A noticeable percentage of the sweet potatoes go bad ...


2

Without pictures (or perhaps lab results), it is very difficult to say. It sounds like your sweet potatoes may have been infested with mold (thus the dark color), in which case the wisest course of action would be to have discarded them. In general, you should be suspicious of any unexpected appearance in your produce. Note: I am inferring the item in ...


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