6

The theories that have come out in comments are most likely right on. Cast iron is special in how well it retains heat. Give cast iron ample preheating time, and you can drop in cold food without a significant drop in the temperature of the pan. That equals crispy. Even a pretty good and heavy non-stick pan is not going to give sweet potatoes the kind of ...


5

Thickness is important and there are different strategies for dealing with different thicknesses. But if you're having a problem getting them dry and crisp in the center before the exterior browns too much, there are a few standard suggestions. In order of complexity/extra work: Make sure you're frying at an optimal temperature. You might try varying a ...


5

Freezing fries opens up their texture and makes them more fluffy. This is helpful for regular fries or sweet potato fries. Sweet potatoes have too much sugar and not enough starch to crisp up on their own. The only crispy sweet potato fries I have ever made- or eaten- were coated in starch to provide the crispiness. While I haven't tried this exact recipe- ...


5

I peel and cook sweet potatoes with butter or oleo in a crock pot, about a half pound for 6-8 pounds of sweet potatoes, then use an electric mixer to pull out most of the strings - mix for a few minutes, lift up the mixer to spin off the sweet potatoes, turn it off and wash the strings off. Do that until only a small amount of strings are collected. Then to ...


5

It depends on what you mean by "yam". Once upon a time, in the deep south of the US, there was a tuber known as the sweet potato, and it was good. And then one particular grower decided to sell theirs under the trade name "yam" to get better marketing recognition. This lead to some folks in the US calling sweet potatoes by the name yam, especially in the ...


5

the reason you haven't found any recipes for soggy sweet potato fries is because of one simple fact: soggy is the default state for oven fries, unless you do something to specifically make the crispy. So, in search of non-crispy fries, here is a list of things you could try: Cook at a low temperature; over 400°f makes crispy fries, so closer to 350°f will ...


4

It seems that the best answer to your needs will be making a treacle. It may be challenging to do it with yams, it's typically done with less starchy plants. But I don't think it's impossible, it should be worth a try. Making a treacle basically involves taking a fruit juice, and slowly evaporating and caramelizing it. So, your first step will be to ...


4

Based on everything you provided in your question, the best thing to do is for you to do at least a series of timed trials and ideally timed trials at different temperatures. There is not enough to suggest a cooking time. As for temperature, you already have a range. While I do not have an answer to your question on cooking time, this is what I would do ...


4

Hi Lisa and welcome to Seasoned Advice! What you don't want is a thin pan. You will run the risk of burning, especially on the bottom. But it's not all bad news. Cast iron is thick and while it will take longer to heat up than a thin pan, it will provide a more even heat. Another thing to consider is that a dark pan usually cooks a little quicker (...


4

Those are just burnt or almost-burnt spots where the sugars in the sweet potatoes caramelized a bit too much. It's possible the potatoes are still palatable - taste them.


3

The above recipe is valid but tedious. Try recipe below without the freezing part. Sweet potatoes do need a coating for crispness to replicate the double fry method achieved with potatoes. This recipe is for 2 pounds of sweet potatoes. If making more, make more soda bath as needed. The simpler method is to only peel and cut them when you are ready to ...


3

Okay, after looking around a bit, I think the proper description of the sweet potato in your picture is 'pithy'. And I saw some pics where this condition had progressed much further than it had in yours. It seems that what causes this is temperatures too high during the storage time. I found references to this in several places. From the University of ...


3

I would also cut down on the "Full Basket" to lessen the Oil Temp Recovery. Try just a few handfuls at a time to keep the temp above 325'F. Frying time per batch should only be between 1 - 2 minutes.


3

This would be a great job for an immersion blender. Consider it a great excuse to buy a really handy gadget :) On Amazon you can find good ones for as little as $20 or you can spend over $100 for all of the bells and whistles.


3

This depends a bit on the kind of result you are aiming for, generally speaking most people struggle to keep their sweet potatoes "in shape" and prevent disintegrating: For a slightly textured result, cooking your peeled and cubed sweet potatoes long enough should suffice, just make sure you have enough liquid in your dish and stir every now and then to ...


3

The purple skin sweet potatoes generally takes shorter time to boil in water that the white skin ones. You will find that it takes roughly the same amount of times as the golden skin potatoes which is roughly 15 minutes. They generally always becomes mushy once cooked by boiling. If you intend to pan fried or grill it, just let it boil for about 10 ...


3

Ziggy's Potato Cutters will handle sweet potatoes...they are harder on the blade but it does a fine job. www.ribbonfries.biz


3

The need for contact is correct, but not really the issue here (else you could have pre-rubbed your potatoes). Both caramelization and Maillard reaction (which are different things) require rather high temperatures. The reason to use steaming as a technique is to not get up to these temperatures. In traditional steaming, you only get your food to 100°C. In a ...


2

i cook sweet potatoes in microwave. I cut them up and put them into tupperware style container. The more sweet potato i put in; the longer i cook it. For a lot of it; it might be as much as 14 - 17 minutes. For a little; 7 - 10 minutes.


2

Livingston, California's sweet potato packing sheds store sweet potatoes for up to a year. Each year's crop is harvested from late August into early October. They are kept in the dark, in either 20 pound bins or 1,000 pound bins, in dry warehouses with temperatures of about 55 - 59 degrees Fahrenheit. A noticeable percentage of the sweet potatoes go bad ...


2

You can improve the operation of the sweet potato cutter by microwaving the potato for about a minute and cutting off the ends to square it up against the blade. And don't try to cut with one push. Rather a series of less forceful pushes pressuring the potato a little bit at a time. Don't be afraid to use PAM on the blades to reduce friction. Good luck.


2

In preparation, there shouldn't be differences beyond the obvious (cook the fresh, drain the canned, etc), but the flavor will be different. Canned yams are frequently packed in syrup, which will make them very sweet. Some people think that canned goods taste "like can" as well. On the other side, the method used to cook the yams will effect the texture and ...


2

You could try par-boiling the fries first. Drop your cut yams into boiling water until they begin to soften (about 5-7 minutes.) Remove them and let the cool completely before frying. 12-14 minutes seems like an awfully long time to keep something immersed in boiling oil. The par-cook method, while increasing overall preparation time will increase the ...


2

It is, as you said, oxidation. As soon as you cut them, put them in a bowl under water. Kills the oxygen supply/reaction.


1

That's a yam, not a sweet potato. Looks like tropical rot. Probably had one or more insects get into it in the monsoon season. Looks like a fungus infection to me. Too wet a soil.


1

A microwave with a grill (broiler) element does this. You need to turn the sweet potatoes over a couple of times to get reasonably even coverage. Better still is a microwave with a combination microwave and convection mode (but these aren't cheap). If you don't have such a microwave, you can try preheating your grill while the potatoes are cooking and ...


1

A recipe calling for a cast iron pan is likely going to rely on the properties of that pan, to make the recipe work as it should. That doesn't mean you can't make it without the proper pan - if thin metal is all you have, you can work around it - it just means it will take some other shenanigans to make the recipe work instead. So, first - if you don't ...


1

As user36802 noted, cooking fries normally requires blanching the fries beforehand, which will par-cook them. You can also check out this Food Lab article; in it, Kenji Lopez suggests parboiling the fries, then drying them and frying them once, followed by cooling and freezing them overnight. His recipe continues to fry the fries a second time before ...


1

It might be possible to roast yams, whip them up and the spin them in a centrifuge. I imagine the yield would be incredibly low because the liquid content of a yam is fairly low. What if, instead, you attempted a yam flavored syrup? You could roast cut up yams in a simple syrup, mash/whip, then clarify. Again, a centrifuge would be ideal, but there are ...


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