5

the reason you haven't found any recipes for soggy sweet potato fries is because of one simple fact: soggy is the default state for oven fries, unless you do something to specifically make the crispy. So, in search of non-crispy fries, here is a list of things you could try: Cook at a low temperature; over 400°f makes crispy fries, so closer to 350°f will ...


2

It is, as you said, oxidation. As soon as you cut them, put them in a bowl under water. Kills the oxygen supply/reaction.


1

Here's a life hack for you: When heating your oil, constantly poke a chopstick into the heating oil to touch the bottom of the pot/fryer. When micro bubbles begin to come out of the tip of the chopstick when you make it touch the bottom of the pot in the oil, it should be the right temperature to fry soggy fires. If you are going to use the standard frying ...


1

If you want to devote the time to get the maximum sweetness, you can take advantage of natural enzymes to accomplish your goal. If you can hold your yams between 135 and 170°F (57 and 77°C) for a couple of hours, you can dramatically increase the sweetness. They will still be hard at this point, so will need roasting to soften. A sous vide device will be ...


1

Use a higher temperature, say 210ºC, and must pre-heat for 6-7 minutes.


1

It might come down to technique. I've had good luck with baking sweet potatoes whole (unpeeled), and then mashing them. But because I know the strands tend to run along the long axis, I cut it into sections (about 1cm / 1/2" thick) across that axis before mashing. They're soft enough at that point that I just use a metal spatula to chop them up, and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible