29

Don't throw it away. Worst case you use up the mystery sweetener on yourself, and use a new pack of Stevia for your wife and anything you share. That's what I recommend if you're not convinced by my solution or don't have sensitive kitchen scales. At room temperature, sucrose (normal sugar) is very soluble in water: about 200 g of sugar will dissolve ...


27

There's some variation in how people respond to Stevia: From 2013: Multiple genes manage how people taste sweeteners another study recently published in the journal Chemosensory Perception, Allen had 122 participants taste two stevia extracts, RebA -- Rebaudioside A -- and RebD -- Rebaudioside D. Stevia is a South American plant that has served as a ...


27

Ants don't care about artificial sweeteners. Make two piles: one of your mystery sweet stuff and one of real sugar (as a control to make sure there are ants around). Maybe moisten them some or make syrup. Leave them outside somewhere you see ants. Then check them later. Carbohydrates (sugar) are fuel for all animals. Stevia has no food value. Ants ...


21

This answer is specific to OP's situation, and doesn't apply for the general case where "getting it wrong" has fewer consequences. is there any surefire way to tell if this is Stevia and not sugar? No, there is no surefire way you can tell. Within the bounds of an everyday kitchen, and lay-person knowledge; there is no method by which you will be 100% ...


13

It's not. The original consumers of chocolate, the Native Americans, had their chocolate in bitter teas and savory moles. They mainly were after its caffeine effects. We could speculate about the overuse of sweeteners in general, especially among peoples of European descent. Other ingredients like mint, cinnamon, and cardamon come to mind. In the European ...


11

Wow, do not throw it away, especially if you have a scale or yeast handy. There are 2 easy methods to determine whether the unknown sweetener is sugar or not. Try fermenting unknown sweetener with yeast With the exception of lactose, yeast can feed on all "real" sugars, or at least the ones you'd normally keep in your kitchen. On the other hand, in all of ...


10

The ingredient is Mizuame (水飴), a Japanese sweetener. It adds sweetness and gives a luster. When they need large amount, professional cooks usually scoops it with their bare hands, as she does in the movie. I'm not sure of the reason, but Mizuame is very sticky and it is troublesome to handle with tools. And this behavior explains that she has long ...


10

Honeycomb can be made with honey or molasses but the flavor will not be the same. There isn't a US equivalent - we have molasses, but it's darker. You can substitute corn syrup in recipes where it isn't the principal ingredient, but here that would not work. That being said, my local grocery store has a British food section which carries golden syrup. You ...


9

I don't know how good of an answer this is, but I really dislike the stuff. I can't taste sweetness at all from it. Mostly, even when eaten straight, it just tastes bitter and there is no "sweet" taste. When I tried using it to replace sugar in cookies, I had added equal amounts of stevia powder to what was supposed to be sugar. (1 cup for 1 cup, your not ...


9

OK, this one will not be very practical, but I was inspired by one of the answers who claimed that there is no surefire way to tell But there is. Sugar is optically active. A linearly polarized light beam will rotate while traveling through sugar. There is an instrument that measures this called polarimeter and, actually, its main use in business is to ...


8

The short answer is that it's probably safe, but here are some considerations: What Does Yeast Do? Yeast eats sugar and converts it to carbon dioxide (also alcohol, but that's not a consideration in most bread baking). "Sugar" doesn't necessary mean sucrose (table sugar) - it also means fructose and glucose, like you'd find in honey or agave syrup....


7

I use Golden Syrup, here in the US, all the time; I find it in the regular baking section, but I have seen it, like the previous answer, in the international section. I'm sure it's the same in the UK, but here it now comes in easy-pour plastic bottles (just in case you were looking for it in different packaging), rather than only in tins like I used to buy (...


5

I hate answering my own question, but after a month I did (finally) find a pseudo-answer that works for Stevia. I've not yet tried it for any other sweeteners. Melt into fat and freeze it For example, the recipe I use for cookies needs four (4) tablespoons of melted butter. I started by melting two tablespoons in butter (well, 1TB butter and 1TB ...


5

It definitely works if everything is room temperature or a bit warmer, maybe 20-30C (68-86F), and it definitely won't work if it's all pretty cold. It sounds like you may be a little too far on the cold end. You have coffee at 0C, plenty of ice to hold it at 0C, and a small amount of condensed milk at room temperature that'll rapidly cool down as soon as it'...


5

Put a pinch of each into a pan and heat it. Real sugar will turn into brown and sticky caramel. Sweetener won't.


4

make your own golden syrup by boiling sugar and water and add a little lemon juice to stop it crystalizing there are a few videos on youtube to show you how its made well easy hope this helps another brit now living in the usa


4

I find, myself, that it's really easy to become taste-blind to stevia - that in higher concentrations or sometimes with repeated use it overwhelms the tongue and doesn't get translated as sweetness at all, but rather something like the taste equivalent of white noise. That "magnitudes sweeter" can really mean an overwhelming amount of too much. It might ...


4

I would put the bay leaves in right at the beginning (with the water, dressing, and mustard) and remove them right before you temper the eggs since you don't want to accidentally grab a bay leaf and whisk it into the eggs when tempering. Also, just a tip for recipes, list the ingredients in the order you use them in the recipes (that means put the mustard ...


3

Depending on how big your package of sweets is, you might be able to get a sort of "moat" around it. Put it in a dish of water, but on/in a second containment to keep the water off the sweets themselves. My husband does this with the jar of honey and it works great. I guess ants don't like to swim.


3

You need to place them in something ants can't get into. A box, jar, or sealed plastic bag should to the trick. Note that as @joe points out in the comments, whatever you use has to seal tightly, and the plastic bags have to be thick.


3

The answer is yes. I found this link for you from Genius Kitchen https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/sweetened-condensed-milk-with-splenda-412496 There are many recipes for both low carb and diabetic friendly Sweetened condensed milk. Also the following: https://www.yummly.com/recipes/sweetened-condensed-milk-with-splenda


3

I've not seen the movie but from my knowledge and the recipes I just reviewed, bean paste is typically sweetened with regular granulated sugar. Could the gelatinous substance maybe be a thick simple syrup of water and sugar? I tried to find clips from that specific scene online and didn't have any luck. There are also candies that use red bean paste as an ...


3

Sugar won't dissolve enough. You should use a simple syrup. Equal parts sugar and water, boiled to dissolve then cooled. I get that eggy flavor in my eggnog when I overcook it. Another way to try and mask it is to add more rum flavoring.


2

I had always wanted an "artificial" sweetener that worked for me, but I have always been extremely sensitive to them. Not that they give me headaches or anything like that, I just find them vile. The aftertaste especially was just nasty to me. Then one day I was offered a water with a couple of drops of flavoring. It was like drinking lemonade. Sugar ...


2

I find it odd when people say there's no equivalent in the USA, I beg to differ . We have Golden Eagle Brand golden syrup since 1928 that's made right here by hand to this day. It's made in Fayette, Alabama and it's far superior to Lyle's. You can order it online it's $3 a pint!! You can order it in the 16 oz or all the way up. I usually purchase the 32 oz ...


2

I had never heard of golden syrup and found these when I googled it. You can order it online, for example from King Arthur. And you can make your own as in this video.


2

I have good taste perception, and have had genetic testing done as well (23andMe, when they were doing the medical and trair testing). Due to major taste genes, I'm supposed to be almost unable to taste bitter things. PTC paper, for instance, just tastes like paper with a touch of soap, not bitter at all. But I do taste bitter things, like coffee, grapefruit ...


2

From a farmer who was in love with his watermelons. There are 2 things you want to check for when eating a watermelon A)ripeness B)sugar concentration To tell if a watermelon is ripe check the pale spot on it’s belly. It should be yellow/white not green at all. To test for sugar concentration tap on the watermelon, a dryer sweeter one will make a hollow ...


2

For desserts, you can always add a sauce or topping that is bitter or sour to balance out the sweetness. Citrus, roasted nuts, dried chiles, dark chocolate, or coffee would all help a cloying dessert.


2

I will take a bit of a shot, please feel free to edit/improve this. Most this is lifter from or reworded from here. I chose them as a diabetes help site so they should not be biased against substitutes. Sugar is used for sweetness, and for this aspect any of the sugar substitutes likely can be used and many of them in much less quantities as they tend to ...


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