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37

Some of the water content of the apples has migrated from the apples to the surrounding syrup. This is due to an effect called osmosis. The apple, like all living things is made out of cells that have (among other things) water inside them. The cell walls are semipermeable, meaning small molecules like water can pass through them, but larger molecules like ...


18

A syrup is by definition a thick sweet liquid made using sugar. If you are looking to make a thick savory liquid, perhaps you want to look into thickening agents. Starches and plant-based gums are the most common thickening agents. Some examples include: Starches: arrowroot, cornstarch, potato starch, tapioca Plant-base gums: guar gum, xanthum gum, alginin ...


12

The syrup has very high sugar content and the apples much lower. The syrup pulls water out of the apples by a process known as osmosis, which tries to equalize the sugar concentration on each side of the permeable membranes of the apples' cells.


11

The key factor in syrup's shelf life is the water activity in the syrup, rather than the ingredients used to make it. Generally, the water is all 'bound up' with dissolved sugar so microorganisms can't use it to grow, but the lighter the syrup, the more available water it will have. In my experience, simple syrup is usually kept refrigerated except for ...


11

Sugar is hydrophilic, meaning it's attracted to water. Your water soaked/softened apples likely had a higher moisture content compared to your syrup. The water migrated out of the apples and equalized the sugar concentration. This process is referred to as osmosis. Next time, try boiling the apples in that sugar syrup instead of just water.


10

Honeycomb can be made with honey or molasses but the flavor will not be the same. There isn't a US equivalent - we have molasses, but it's darker. You can substitute corn syrup in recipes where it isn't the principal ingredient, but here that would not work. That being said, my local grocery store has a British food section which carries golden syrup. You ...


9

Golden syrup is indeed gluten free, as neither sugar cane or beet contains gluten. In fact, beet fibre is used in many gluten-free products. See the Tate & Lyle site for more information: http://www.lylesgoldensyrup.com/healthandnutrition.php


8

When heating sugar up in boiled icing or in making candy, the problem is sugar crystallization. This happens because the solution becomes supersaturated and any movement can cause it to shift back into a crystal state. The corn syrup is there to prevent this from happening by providing glucose to 'get in the way'. You can get just 'glucose' at the ...


7

All right, I'll say it as an answer: fructose is one sugar, glucose is another. High fructose corn syrup contains plenty of fructose (but not just that) - it's made by taking corn syrup and converting some glucose to fructose to make it taste sweeter. The exact sugar makeup of glucose syrup varies (see also this previous question), but it certainly hasn't ...


7

My experiment with table sugar, pouring 1/2 cup of table sugar into a glass container then pouring in 1/2 cup of water on top without stirring resulted in the water line reaching the 3/4 cup mark after a few seconds of absorption. So the ratio of the volume of separated sugar and water to the mixture is 3:4.


7

I use Golden Syrup, here in the US, all the time; I find it in the regular baking section, but I have seen it, like the previous answer, in the international section. I'm sure it's the same in the UK, but here it now comes in easy-pour plastic bottles (just in case you were looking for it in different packaging), rather than only in tins like I used to buy (...


6

Concerning "difficult" ingredients and measuring volumetric amounts with a scale: You only have to measure volumetrically ONCE! Once I know that my honey weighs 20 grams per tablespoon (I tared the scale with the wax paper, the measuring spoon and the lid that I used to balance the spoon) I can take that weight and run with it. 1 cup of my honey will ...


6

This is likely due to capillary action drawing the syrup up the tube from the bottle - viscous syrup + a narrow tube = strong capillary action. Since it's one of those pesky laws of nature, there's not a lot you can do about it. You might try transferring the syrup to a container with a wider pump tube (since capillary action is stronger in a narrow tube). ...


6

We had the same problem and it turned our to be due to the temperature changes in the fridge. The expansion/contraction cycle of the syrup made it drip. Does your sauce require refrigeration? If not, try leaving it at room temperature (which doesn't change as much as most fridges). We used a "min/max" memory thermometer for a few days and found that the ...


6

I suspect you are looking for deep explanations where none exist. Flat metal work is flexible; by introducing a bend, it becomes stronger. This is the same principal that makes corrugation, and the same reason car parts are all curved. You will note that paint cans have essentially the same design, for the same reason. The lip around the removable lid is ...


6

Well, you can't really make "elderberry syrup" (as the term is usually understood) from only elderberry extract. Fruit syrups are generally produced from a mixture of fresh berries, sugar, and water, which is cooked and then often strained. You could perhaps make "elderberry-flavored" simple syrup by combining sugar and water, cooking it down to your ...


6

Well - not exactly. The reason that this technique works with lemons is that they actually do contain quite a bit of water. It's not so much "water-free" as it is using the residual water from the rinds and un-squeezed pips. Mint contains a lot less water by weight, so if you tried it in similar portions you'd wind up not with mint syrup, but with slightly-...


6

So, according to a website called A Bar Above, you can make a simple syrup (or "rich simple" apparently) using artificial sweetener, but you won't get the same end result. They tested 3 sweeteners they found, and would recommend sweet'n'low over splenda or equal sweeteners. The taste and aftertaste will be different, and it will depend on the sweetener. ...


5

Alcohol Sugar Fat. Your recipe needs to be more of those and less of water; just like an ice cream. I had luck with agave syrup as a base (maple or cornsyrup?) that I tested by freezing; when I was satisfied by my choice, I melted in chocolate and additional fat (good coconut oil I think). Certainly won't be fudgy outside of freezer so finding a recipe is ...


5

6 TBS (3 ounces by volume) of granulated sugar, mixed with 4 liquid ounces of water (1/2 cup US), brought to a hard boil in the microwave yielded just over 6 liquid ounces of syrup. (A drop of color added for readability) I would suspect that it didn't reach 7 ounces because of the air included in the volumetric measurement of granulated sugar. So 4 cups ...


5

The flavor of lemon zest is in the oils contained in the skin, the best way to extract them is to mechanically extract them, steeping in hot water isn't going to do much for you. First, grate the zest using the finest microplane grater you can get, the more surface are you have the better. Second, you need to crush and/or grind the zest to get the oils out....


4

Honey is your real binding agent here, not maple syrup. You can substitute the sugar-free syrup but be aware of what's in it - according to the ingredients, it's mostly Sorbitol, which is both a humectant and a laxative. Now, ordinarily, I wouldn't tell people to worry about the digestive effects of sorbitol, but that's a seriously large quantity you'd be ...


4

I don't have a recipe for a sorbet without any fruit contributing sugar, but I do have something very close: the lemon sorbet from The Perfect Scoop. It uses a cup of lemon juice, which contains only 6 g of sugar, along with 2.5 cups of water and 1 cup of sugar. So 3.5 cups (828 mL) of water with 1 cup (200 g) of sugar should be good, or a ratio of 4:1 by ...


4

I've done a lot of reading on this subject - as well as quite a bit of my own experimenting - and this is what I've concluded: A highly concentrated simple syrup produced in a sterile environment and stored in sterile containers (with sterile caps) has a shelf life of at least a month as long as the containers remain unopened. I recommend glass bottles with ...


4

The secret is not to get the lip of the tin dirty. Specifically, do not pour the Golden Syrup out of the tin. Use a spoon or a knife to get out the amount you need. Even if you need to fill a spoon ten times that is quicker than pouring and then having to clean the lip. In some parts of the world it is sold in jars. The glass threads of the screw lid ...


4

First I would recommend viewing the episode of Good Eats, Orange Aid. While there is not a direct answer to your question Alton does talk about getting the maximum orange flavor as well as how to avoid the pithy flavor. (This link to Orange Aid will take you to Amazon Prime, where if you are not an Amazon Prime member you may purchase for $2.99...) The take ...


4

make your own golden syrup by boiling sugar and water and add a little lemon juice to stop it crystalizing there are a few videos on youtube to show you how its made well easy hope this helps another brit now living in the usa


4

You can leave your Gulab Jamun in sugar syrup for minimum 30 minutes to maximum as long as you wish. Before service you can bring Gulab Jamun to room temperature or you can even microwave and serve little warm.


4

I don't know what exactly it is about citrus - whether a particular combination of proteins, essential oils, lots of small particulates, or something else - but in my experience this is common to many citrus fruit. It seems to be a general property that they capture gas bubbles very effectively, leading to froth. Citrus froths impressively whenever it's ...


3

First, one obvious thought is to use a fat that doesn't solidify, like most vegetable oils. Hazelnut oil is really delicious in chocolate sauce and will probably have the right effect. If you don't want that flavour you could try groundnut or almond oil. I guess you might need some emulsifier though to prevent it separating. A little corn flour might do it (...


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