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6

This might be an old question but I still stumbled on it and figured others would too, so it's still worth answering. Difference: The grind makes all the difference. Pre-made masa for tortillas doesn't have lard mixed into it. It's just finely ground and mixed with water to make the dough. Great for tortillas. Pre-made masa for tamales is very light and ...


5

In some cuisines, the masa isn't usually corn at all. Sometimes it's rice, sometimes it's plantain and/or other starchy fruit. The tamale-like dish is actually called pasteles, but the difference between tamales and pasteles seems to be primarily the corn. Check out this informational link and these recipes from Epicurious and The Polynesian Kitchen; and ...


4

I know this thread is way old but I did just find it 😀It took me years to figure out that it was my meat filling that was too wet, making my tamales take forever to steam.


4

My mom (from Guadalajara) used to often wrap them in parchment paper, since it can withstand being heated/steamed. I don't know why she started doing it - probably because it annoyed her that the delicious filling often oozed out of the tamales during the steaming. Anyway, Just to make sure, I would use double sheets the first time you try the parchment to ...


3

I recommend clarifying the butter first, and then using it for your tamales. Butter is about 16-18% water, which could significantly affect the fat content of the dish. If you do that, it should work fine from a mechanical perspective; the melting points and viscosity are similar enough. I think you may run the risk of being slightly distracted by the flavor....


3

In response to when you should freeze your tamales; I have been making tamales with my family since I was a child. We assembly our tamales and put a dozen of them in a freezer bag. We freeze them before we cook them. We usually make them two or three weeks in advance. The morning that we cook them we set them on the kitchen counter to thaw. We place them on ...


2

The best way to reheat tamales either frozen or unfrozen is to wet a paper towel and wrap it around the tamale husk, making like a package. Mike for a minute if unfrozen. This way the masa stays nice and moist and never dries out. As far as freezing is concerned, I don't freeze them unsteamed because the whole process is kind of damp or wet and they could ...


2

I used a roasting pan with a rack. I filled pan with water, put tamales on rack and covered with foil. I used 400 degrees for an hour and did twelve, but could have fit a bit more.


1

Masa para tamales is simply a coarser grind. In some markets it is referred to as masa quebradita. Masa para tortillas is a finer grind. Neither is made from dry powder and neither is made from fresh corn. Both are made from dried corn cooked in cal and ground when wet. If you see only one kind, it is likely the finer masa for tortillas. It will work ...


1

Fresh masa the type you buy at your local molino is basicalltly the same. The masa for tamales spreads easier on the cor chuck than the masa fo tortillas. Same holds true with maseca for tortilla or for tamales. Maseca is dried corn flour. Fresh masa is made in a molino (tortilla factory).


1

My husband stole my cookie racks and rigged them in his giant stock pot uses lots of foil and Saran wraps the lid on for a good steam seal and cooks about 300 tamales at a time in a few hours.


1

I have made tamales for about 30 years and I too learned from my grandmother and my mother. But the secret to fluffier tamale dough is baking powder and salt.


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