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13

Pie and tart are regional (North American versus Western European) terms for essentially the same thing. Some will argue that the pans make the difference (see below), but I don't buy that story. There are some stylistic differences that appear quite often, but nothing that makes them truly different things: Pies tend to be deeper, and have more filling ...


8

If your dough is very dry and crumbly, it needs more water. Add a few mL to the dough when adding the beaten egg.


6

Well, it seems that Mazarin's predecessor (and at the time, mentor), Cardinal Richelieu, was instrumental in the creation of the Treaty of Bärwalde, which made Sweden and France steadfast allies (with the French basically funding nearly forty thousand Swedish soldiers). Once Mazarin replaced Richelieu there were already strong diplomatic ties between the two ...


5

Pies originally were specifically to denote enclosed items (the crust sealed the item that was to be eaten). In many cases, the crust wasn't actually eaten -- it was a nasty charred thing that was discarded. In time, pie crusts improved to the point at which you'd eat the whole thing ... but the star was the filling, not the crust. Tarts, on the other ...


5

RockyFord's comment has the heart of the matter, I think--the acid in lemon juice will begin to denature or curdle to the proteins in the eggs if it comes into direct, undiluted contact with them. You can minimize this effect by beating together all of the ingredients except the lemon juice prior to mixing in the lemon juice. This will add a lot of sugar ...


5

Cook one layer, pour it into the shell, and chill until firm. When it's firm, cook and add the second layer. You don't want to add the curd while it's still super hot. Let it cool a bit, but pour it before it begins to set. Repeat with the third layer. That procedure should give you very clean and lasting layers.


5

The recipe is a prototypical German style Mürbeteig, and whatever went wrong, it is not with the ratio, so it must be something about the process. If you have problems, I'd say the first thing to do is to ditch the food processor. This type of dough is not designed for it, and when troubleshooting, it is best to try to get the standard process working ...


4

Welcome to the site Elle! This tart filling is a custard as the thickening agent is egg yolks. If it isn't thickening up enough then one of two things is happening: The mix isn't being brought up to temperature. The recipe's instructions aren't very good because it talks about a time rather than a target temperature. Egg yolk will set at about 70°C (160&...


4

The rice/beans in this step act as a form of what are known as pie weights. They are used in order to maintain the shape of the crust as it is being baked. If you eliminate the weights during baking, you may encounter undesirable levels of puffing, curling and shrinking. If you'd rather brown the top of the bottom crust while baking, an alternative method ...


3

I can offer an example from work experience. When making flatbread, I shared this with a co-worker. We were docking the rounds to keep them from puffing up like little pillows, for this we want flat breads that are flat. Docking correctly allows for small "pillows" of air, yet the overall product does not rise much. I baked one without docking to demonstrate ...


3

TL:DR; don't chill the pieces after you cut them. Assemble it straight away. Long version: I think what's happening is that chilling after cutting the pieces will dry the surface, making it harder for them to stick together when assembling. The point of putting the dough in the fridge is to help stabilise temperature, allow sugar and other solid stuff (...


2

You can line a typical pie pan with parchment paper. Cut a precise circle to cover the bottom, than a precise rectagle or trapezoid to fit the side. You can use a tiny bit of butter or shortening to stick the parchment paper to the pan and keep it in place. Once it is cooked, you can work a knife then a spatula or two under the paper and lift it all out in ...


2

If there is really no way to delicately take off the moulds, I'd suggest feezing them. Then once they've hardened, heat up the mould and try to push the tarts out/bang the mould on a hard (not fragile...) surface. They'll be hard enough so you can apply more force without breaking. As a last resort... :) Also, removing them right out of the oven might not ...


1

I had a couple ideas that might help. One idea is scoring the dough, where it will rest against the adjoining piece - thin lines, or cross hatching, just something to roughen the surface. This will give the dough a bit more surface area in the join for the dough pieces to catch on each other and interlock at the interface. You might even use some kind ...


1

Docking is used in order to get the air bubble pockets out of the crust. Depending on when the dough was made, to the temperature of the dough itself, you can use anything to dock a pizza including your fingertips as if you are clawing at it. It is the same as edge stretching except you are putting holes in the dough to release air and gases.


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