Hot answers tagged

55

It's actually the opposite, you shouldn't boil water for tea unless you want it boiling. Water has dissolved oxygen in it, the more you have the nicer your tea will taste. This has been covered in this question. The hotter your water gets, the faster it loses dissolved oxygen, so you'll get better tea (for most people's palates) if you raise your water to ...


47

White, green, oolong, and black tea are all products of Camellia sinensis leaves and buds, the only difference is how they are processed. You can turn the plant matter into any of the varieties. Different sources will give different accounts of the processing steps, but in rough order of least-to-most processed: White tea is minimally processed and not ...


47

What is wrong with a regular ice cube? As you state that the tea is not yet ready, you just use slightly less water and then add the ice cube, which has a fixed temperature. I use this for large scale ice tea production. As I use 1:1 hot water : ice cubes I simply brew a double strong tea.


37

One solution would be to use Whiskey Stones. These are essentially stone (or metal) cubes that you normally use for whiskey to chill it without diluting it. This will also work for your tea However, if this is a problem you run into regularly, you can freeze an ice tray with tea to make tea ice cubes and use that to cool down your tea. The main downside is, ...


34

In general it looks like 65-75% of the total caffeine comes out in the first steeping, while 20-25% comes out in the second steeping. This was addressed in this paper which examined different types of tea. The results are summarized in this table. For more details check out this reddit thread.


33

Possibly even easier than using ice or fridges or anything... pour it repeatedly from one container to another. Constant exposure to the air will rapidly cool the drink, you can get it to drinking temperature in less than a minute. (Just make sure you pour accurately, or use larger containers. Spilling hot tea is no fun.) Here's an example of a street ...


28

Chai masala variants may be boiled that long or more – they do contain black tea, but also spices (where the boiling is needed, to extract the flavor from whole spices). The tea decoction this produces does contain all of the bitter compounds, sure – but it is mixed with spices, diluted generously with milk and sugar, and becomes a palatable drink that is ...


21

It's hard to know exactly what you're referring to without any context of the event, location, or what you remember it tasting like, so I'll give you my best educated guesses. If your pink tea sweet and fruity or floral, it was an herbal tea - tisane, and not true tea. ("Tea" actually refers to the plant whose leaves are used the beverage. Anything that is ...


20

Storing Tea You tea should never become bitter due to your storage methods. The only thing that should happen to tea as a result of how you store it is general loss of flavor or loss of the complexity of flavor (in a green tea, you might lose any honey or fruit notes of a tea that has been improperly stored, but it'll still taste like green tea). There ...


19

I do this everyday before I leave for work. I can't have really hot tea. So once my tea is ready: I put it in a tea pan (a deep pan used to make tea). You can substitute with any other clean deep pan. Add cold water to the kitchen sink Stand the tea pan in the kitchen sink for 2-4 minutes And I have the perfect temperature for my tea that suits me :) You ...


18

The answer to this depends a lot on variables in the steeping process. Steeping at a higher temperature will remove more caffeine. Steeping for longer will remove more caffeine. Doing either or both of these will leave less caffeine for a second or third (or more) steeping. Using whole leaves can slow down caffeine extraction, while using fannings (as in ...


17

In the interests of science I gave this a try. Used a can of carbonated water, boiled in my kettle. There was no boiling water explosion, although I more than half expected one. It seemed to maybe boil a little faster, but that's more likely due to the fact that it's less liquid than I usually heat. Being a tea fanatic I have a lot of flavored teas but I ...


16

This is normal. Even with whole leaf tea, it's a dried (and cooked) product. You're going to experience some "crumbling," and, in my experience, these grounds are more common with loose leafed tea than with dust-in-a-bag. Just pour out the last of your cup--or get used to the texture.


16

Hojicha is a green tea which is made from bancha, a low grade green tea, and cooked slightly; this very inexpensive green tea often comes out brown because it is discolored by oxidation. Other than this variety, and some very stale bancha, I can't think of a Japanese green tea that comes out brown. Some stale kukicha might come out brown, and low quality ...


15

Rate Tea tells us this is a myth: Many tea companies, and even some reputable entities such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have made misleading generalizations about the caffeine content of broad classes of tea. It is a widespread myth that black tea contains more caffeine than green tea, and another myth that white tea contains the least ...


15

Pour the tea back and forth between two cups until the desired temperature. Adjusting the height of pouring is fun to play with to get faster results but try it over a kitchen sink.


14

I recently observed the effect of time of steeping on caffeine content in tea. We used High Pressure Liquid Chromatography to determine the levels of caffeine in Green Tea in samples that were steeped for 1, 2, 4, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 120 mins. The concentration of caffeine over time did not show any significant trends. Our results suggest that caffeine ...


14

I do make coffee the same way as tea. I just did this morning, in fact. It's called a "French press". Which can also be used for tea ...


14

In Northern Germany, sugar crystals similar to the style depicted on the linked web page are used for "East Frisian Tea". East Frisian Tea is more a style of tea service than a specific variety of tea, but usually some blend of Indian black teas is used, often Assam and Darjeeling, but some variation from that is possible; the main thing is that it's not an ...


14

When you boil water in a cup in a microwave, it will often boil without forming bubbles, because unlike a kettle with a rough heating element or inner surface, a clean ceramic cup has few nucleation points. Nucleation points allow pockets of gas to form, which become bubbles as the water boils. When you add the teabag to the hot water, you are essentially ...


14

The equivalent of coffee beans would be loose leaf teas. This is the traditional way to enjoy tea, and is generally preferred by tea connoisseurs. Just like whole-bean coffee, loose leaf tea keep fresh longer than bagged tea, and generally has a richer flavor. Tea bags are generally prepared by the cut-tear-curl (CTC) process, which breaks up the leaves ...


14

Plain white vinegar is the normal way to remove coffee tastes and stains. Hot vinegar works better


14

The problem is that "herbal tea" is a very broad category. Some herbs, like woody stems or roots, require a bit more "decocting," which the higher temperature helps with. Ginger or ginseng root, pine needles, rose hips, sarsaparilla, and similar plant bits all fit this bill, and some of those I'd honestly go ahead and boil for some time, not just steep. But ...


14

In response to the answer posted by @James, I've run the following experiment: Ingredients: Black tea by "Tea Merchant", flavor = "Ship Ahoy" Colorless and flavorless gelatin powder, bought from the baking isle in a supermarket. Process: 1) I made 4 cups of tea, each with 1 tea spoon of tea leaves straight into the cup: Control cup, no addition 1/4 ...


13

All moving water has dissolved oxygen in it. That is what fish breath Dissolved oxygen is reactive, and will most likely extract more substances from the tea leaf, than without it. If these are the good flavour parts of tea, I do not know? When you heat water it starts to release the dissolved oxygen. The more you heat water the more oxygen escapes You ...


13

Either buy a cheap electric kettle, or if you are really fussed about not re-boiling water then shell out a bit more for one of the single cup hot water dispensers like the Tefal Quick Cup or the Breville Hot Cup. We have both a cheap kettle and a Breville Hot Cup in our office. The kettle is good for making cups for multiple people at the same time, the ...


13

Tea needs to be kept away from heat, light, air, and moisture. The best way to store tea is at room temperature in an opaque, airtight container. Your container should not be plastic, because odors from previous uses (even if its only been used solely for tea) could contaminate your current tea. Do not store tea in the freezer or refrigerator. Opening and ...


13

Seconds, not minutes. Just the act of pouring the water will cool it slightly. At sea-level pure water will be 100C at a full boil, the temperature will drop immediately when it's no longer being heated. This is unscientific at best, but just for giggles I put an accurate digital thermometer into a room temperature mug, and brought a couple of cups of cups ...


13

Good news: I finally got 'round to cleaning the strainer, and it's clean and works well again. Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions. I ran it through the dishwasher (twice), with no benefit; still clogged. Next, I put dishwasher detergent (not dish soap) and the strainer into a small cup. Then I added boiling water and let it sit overnight. The ...


12

In Chinese tea "rituals" they "rinse" the leaves with hot water before steeping. Fill the pot with water and dump it out right away. Then fill your pot and continue as normal. This gets rid of the majority of the "dust". Like the others said, yes it's normal.


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