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55

It's actually the opposite, you shouldn't boil water for tea unless you want it boiling. Water has dissolved oxygen in it, the more you have the nicer your tea will taste. This has been covered in this question. The hotter your water gets, the faster it loses dissolved oxygen, so you'll get better tea (for most people's palates) if you raise your water to ...


47

What is wrong with a regular ice cube? As you state that the tea is not yet ready, you just use slightly less water and then add the ice cube, which has a fixed temperature. I use this for large scale ice tea production. As I use 1:1 hot water : ice cubes I simply brew a double strong tea.


37

One solution would be to use Whiskey Stones. These are essentially stone (or metal) cubes that you normally use for whiskey to chill it without diluting it. This will also work for your tea However, if this is a problem you run into regularly, you can freeze an ice tray with tea to make tea ice cubes and use that to cool down your tea. The main downside is, ...


36

In general it looks like 65-75% of the total caffeine comes out in the first steeping, while 20-25% comes out in the second steeping. This was addressed in this paper which examined different types of tea. The results are summarized in this table. For more details check out this reddit thread.


35

The white rind of the lemon is what causes the bitter flavour. To get simply the lemon flavour you just want the zest. Use a zester, microplane, or fine grater to scrape off only the yellow bit of the peel and nothing white and you'll get a lovely lemon flavour without the bitterness or sourness.


34

Possibly even easier than using ice or fridges or anything... pour it repeatedly from one container to another. Constant exposure to the air will rapidly cool the drink, you can get it to drinking temperature in less than a minute. (Just make sure you pour accurately, or use larger containers. Spilling hot tea is no fun.) Here's an example of a street ...


28

Chai masala variants may be boiled that long or more – they do contain black tea, but also spices (where the boiling is needed, to extract the flavor from whole spices). The tea decoction this produces does contain all of the bitter compounds, sure – but it is mixed with spices, diluted generously with milk and sugar, and becomes a palatable drink that is ...


19

I do this everyday before I leave for work. I can't have really hot tea. So once my tea is ready: I put it in a tea pan (a deep pan used to make tea). You can substitute with any other clean deep pan. Add cold water to the kitchen sink Stand the tea pan in the kitchen sink for 2-4 minutes And I have the perfect temperature for my tea that suits me :) You ...


18

The answer to this depends a lot on variables in the steeping process. Steeping at a higher temperature will remove more caffeine. Steeping for longer will remove more caffeine. Doing either or both of these will leave less caffeine for a second or third (or more) steeping. Using whole leaves can slow down caffeine extraction, while using fannings (as in ...


17

I recently observed the effect of time of steeping on caffeine content in tea. We used High Pressure Liquid Chromatography to determine the levels of caffeine in Green Tea in samples that were steeped for 1, 2, 4, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 120 mins. The concentration of caffeine over time did not show any significant trends. Our results suggest that caffeine ...


17

Four additional options: Lemon oil - be sure to get one intended for cooking, not an essential oil Lemon extract - made from alcohol, lemon zest, and sometimes lemon oil; you can buy this or make it at home Dried lemon zest - available as a seasoning, check the spice section of your grocery store Frozen lemon zest - you make this yourself, just zest a lemon,...


15

Rate Tea tells us this is a myth: Many tea companies, and even some reputable entities such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have made misleading generalizations about the caffeine content of broad classes of tea. It is a widespread myth that black tea contains more caffeine than green tea, and another myth that white tea contains the least ...


15

Pour the tea back and forth between two cups until the desired temperature. Adjusting the height of pouring is fun to play with to get faster results but try it over a kitchen sink.


14

The problem is that "herbal tea" is a very broad category. Some herbs, like woody stems or roots, require a bit more "decocting," which the higher temperature helps with. Ginger or ginseng root, pine needles, rose hips, sarsaparilla, and similar plant bits all fit this bill, and some of those I'd honestly go ahead and boil for some time, not just steep. But ...


14

In response to the answer posted by @James, I've run the following experiment: Ingredients: Black tea by "Tea Merchant", flavor = "Ship Ahoy" Colorless and flavorless gelatin powder, bought from the baking isle in a supermarket. Process: 1) I made 4 cups of tea, each with 1 tea spoon of tea leaves straight into the cup: Control cup, no addition 1/4 ...


13

Tea needs to be kept away from heat, light, air, and moisture. The best way to store tea is at room temperature in an opaque, airtight container. Your container should not be plastic, because odors from previous uses (even if its only been used solely for tea) could contaminate your current tea. Do not store tea in the freezer or refrigerator. Opening and ...


13

Seconds, not minutes. Just the act of pouring the water will cool it slightly. At sea-level pure water will be 100C at a full boil, the temperature will drop immediately when it's no longer being heated. This is unscientific at best, but just for giggles I put an accurate digital thermometer into a room temperature mug, and brought a couple of cups of cups ...


13

Good news: I finally got 'round to cleaning the strainer, and it's clean and works well again. Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions. I ran it through the dishwasher (twice), with no benefit; still clogged. Next, I put dishwasher detergent (not dish soap) and the strainer into a small cup. Then I added boiling water and let it sit overnight. The ...


12

Speaking very generally, there are three bands of quality when it comes to black tea in the UK Market. Brown (Economy) is your lowest grade, it is the cheapest in the shops and usually very dusty and fibrous. The flavor is weak and the color with milk is a dull brown.Teas can come from central Africa, south India, Argentina and the middle east. Red is the ...


12

You have basically made tea-flavoured vodka. The tea tree (for essential oil) is unrelated to the tea plant for the beverage. Commercially, tea tree oil is produced by steam distillation of the leaves of the tea tree, specifically Melaleuca alternifolia. Though possible to obtain leaves and perform the distillation, it's probably not practical on a small ...


12

The scum on the top of the tea is due to hard water (ie calcium carbonate) deposits combining with the tea and reacting with oxygen, this article has some more details if you are looking for them. I live in a hard water area and I use brita filters to get rid of some of the hardness, I know when the filter needs changing when the hard water scum comes back.


11

This blog article (citing numerous sources) claims that re-boiling water doesn't have any significant effect on tea taste. Here are some key points from it: Heating water above 50˚C already removes most of the oxygen from it, so neither once-boiled nor twice-boiled water contain significant amounts of oxygen. Triangle tests such as this one prove that ...


11

Much of the flavor and aroma of tea comes from volatile oils/compounds. The heat applied to tea leaves while steeping them is key to releasing those volatile compounds but when you reboil the tea, a large portion the flavor compounds in the water are likely just going to be vaporized. The end result is the reheated tea will have very little 'tea' flavor ...


11

I had the chance to ask a tea scientist this very question about 25 years ago, and he said: if you put the tea in first, over decades your cups will be more stained than if you put the milk in first if you put the milk in first, you cannot add less milk on discovering that the tea is weak or there is less of it than you thought He further reported that the ...


11

Adding a 1/4-1/2 teaspoon of gelatin powder dissolved in the boiling water should do the trick. I fermented some arizona and used gelatin to remove the remaining yeast, only to find it removed the tannins as well, yielding a relatively clear liquid with a dark brown sediment at the bottom. I can't guarantee that it won't touch the caffeine, but i see no ...


10

Place the sugar (or salt) in a bowl or plate large enough to hold the glass (upside down) Rub the rim of the glass with lemon (or lime, or use simple syrup) the rim should be wet and sticky. Roll/Dip the rim of the glass in the bowl full of sugar. In my experience, you need to leave the glass to dry for a few minutes to let the sugar or salt settle and ...


10

The tea will be stronger than you'd like if you steep it for too long. Over-steeping sometimes gives a bitter flavor as well. (I am guilty of frequently over-steeping as I have the attention span of a goldfish. Sometimes I remember to set a timer, sometimes not.)


10

If the tea was distilled water, a 5% solution would have been sufficient. That is, you'd need 50 grams of acid to 950 grams of water. The problem is, the impurities of the water and the tea itself buffer it somewhat, so it's impossible to predict the exact amount you need. You'll have to use a pH meter, and an accurate one, not strips, to make a pH solution ...


10

The method we use (for coffee) is pretty simple (though it requires some compatible equipment): Fill kettle. Shove probe thermometer through "whistle" hole in kettle spout. Heat until desired temperature is reached. Pour water into vessel. If you don't have a kettle or your thermometer won't work, you can do the same thing with any pot and a thermometer ...


10

Not something I've ever tried, but I'd be tempted towards either the bottled malt drinks popular in the Caribbean (eg Supermalt), or Horlicks. Or, you can just buy "malt flavour" - Random google search for liquid flavour manufacturers - http://www.weberflavors.com/products/liquid-flavors/ Perhaps your 'crumby' malt could be done as a separate ...


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