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13

The answer to this depends a lot on variables in the steeping process. Steeping at a higher temperature will remove more caffeine. Steeping for longer will remove more caffeine. Doing either or both of these will leave less caffeine for a second or third (or more) steeping. Using whole leaves can slow down caffeine extraction, while using fannings (as in ...


24

In general it looks like 65-75% of the total caffeine comes out in the first steeping, while 20-25% comes out in the second steeping. This was addressed in this paper which examined different types of tea. The results are summarized in this table. For more details check out this reddit thread.


2

There are many chemical compounds in tea, and some more more soluble than others. So a short steep will extract the more soluble compounds, while not extracting much of the less soluble ones. The time when it starts getting bad is a function of both the tea and the water temperature. I personally like stronger teas (5-15 minute steep in hot water), but I ...


-2

I tried it for ten minutes. The flavor is much better - deeper more robust. Try it to see for yourself. Next time I am going to experiment with longer steeping time.


2

Matcha doesn't dissolve. It is very finely ground to be suspended in water after very vigorous whisking when the preparation is done the traditional way. A few tips for your matcha latte: Use good, high quality matcha. High quality matcha is bright green and a very fine powder (almost like confectioner's sugar or cornstarch) - this helps keeping it ...


3

There's no standard blend for English Breakfast tea, and different tea companies may have their own flavor profile they want to achieve. Generally, the goal is to create a more robust tea that goes well with milk. Traditionally, teas from Assam, Ceylon and Kenya are used for the blend. However, today, teas from more locations are used. The benefit of ...


2

Coffee hates boiling water - or more specifically, water boiling at 100°C - it scalds it & kills the taste. but read on... There are basically two kinds of instant coffee, spray dried & freeze dried. Both start by making up 'real' coffee. Spray drying is achieved by then super-heating the mixture & spraying it out into an evaporator. The powder ...


1

I'm not totally sure the answer to your question, but you should look into Turkish style coffee. The style is based on grinding the beans super fine and then boiling it with water. This is a decent primer. https://foolproofliving.com/how-to-make-turkish-coffee/ Specifically pay attention to the foam that forms after boiling. I think that's what you are ...


0

The ph of your final product should be 4.6 or below for it to be shelf stable. You can get a ph meter and experiment at home and when you are confident about the ph, send it to the food lab to get the ph tested. Once you have it certified from the lab, you can hand that over to the department of agriculture. The will certify you and get plan review or ...


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