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24

We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon. This is incorrect. Teflon (PTFE) itself is one of the most non-reactive substances you can use on cookware, in some ways better than ceramic. To quote Wikipedia: It is nonreactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and ...


11

I don't know where your information came from about "We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon", but it is incorrect. Teflon is the least chemically reactive material you are likely to encounter in daily life. There probably are a few substances that can react with it, but if you have a way of sourcing these, you hopefully won't be ...


6

To best check temperature, you need a thermometer, and if you can, use a non-contact thermometer (infrared thermometer). Teflon start degrading at around 260 °C (500 °F). So check the pan temperature, adjust the heat of your range (electric, gas...) so that the temperature stay below that. If you want to use high temperature for some applications, then ...


6

There is no risk to the Teflon itself, or from it; PTFE breaks down at about 500 F, which rice cookers will not achieve, especially on warming setting. Other than that, PTFE is one of the most inert substances known to man, as the atoms are already bound in energetically very favorable bonds: little is as able to displace them without significant input ...


6

Teflon will slowly damage over time no matter how you treat it. Certain things will speed up this damage: too high heat, some metal tools, sandpaper. Unlike an aluminum pan, Teflon will not react to high acid foods like tomatoes by getting damaged. It is a non-reactive material. You will see black flakes start to appear in your food when the original ...


6

First of all, a Teflon pan will get gradually ruined anyway. Even when you don't use oil, the heat and the food itself will wear out the coating, it is just very sensitive this way. Using oil will speed up the process. Second, both existing technologies for nonstick pans, PTFE (Teflon) and ceramic, will get ruined by oil. If you want to cook with olive oil ...


5

Cast iron or carbon steel. Both require seasoning with oil and neither are non-stick immediately, but rather after seasoning and some use, the pans become more non-stick over time. But once they're properly seasoned, they're as non-stick or nearly as non-stick as teflon and the like. They do, however, require the use of fats in cooking. And they can last 30 ...


5

There is no current evidence that already-degraded PTFE (Teflon) poses any toxicity risks in its solid form. To quote the University of California School of Public Health: There’s no evidence, however, that in­gesting any PTFE flakes that might have degraded from the pan’s surface over time poses any health risk, and the American Cancer Society notes ...


4

I hope you're using cake release! And you've never actually "seasoned" it (as in covering it with oil and baking it in a very hot oven). If you did season it, that's a problem. I'll get to that in just a second. Otherwise, all you need is to wash the pan right away in hot soapy water (use a high quality dish soap, ultra cheap ones don't work as well) after ...


4

America's Test Kitchen says that good quality nonstick pans last them about six months. They're presumably cooking with them several times a day, so if you use it once every couple days, and are as good as they are about not doing things that'll damage the coating, you might get a few years. So your experience sounds roughly normal. As another data point, ...


4

It should be fine. The acidity of the vinegar would be an issue if it were to come into contact and react with bare metal. Non-stick cookware is fine for, say, making tomato sauces, etc, which means the coating in not especially reactive to acidity, which makes rice vinegar okay. As a confirming point, when I was walking through Costco yesterday, I saw ...


3

From the T-FAL site: • Oven safe to 500°F/260°C if handles are all stainless steel. Oven safe to 350°F/175°C if handles have any phenolic, plastic parts. Oven safe to 400°F/204°C if handles have any silicone parts. So the pan itself should be fine, but the handles can be damaged. No need to toss it just because you're worried about the coating being ...


3

What I've found that works for any cake pan is to clean it immediately after removing the cake. Following my mother's example, as soon as I turn a cake (or layer) out, I wipe out any residue in the pan with a dry paper towel. This gets it out while it is still moist and before it has a chance to harden on the surface of the pan. Once it hardens, it can be ...


3

There is a common misconception in the stainless steel vs. non-stick discussion that one of the two must be "better" than the other, but this doesn't necessarily have to be the case. It is perhaps more constructive to frame the question in terms of which is "more appropriate" for your regular cooking style. Stainless steel and non-stick cookware both have ...


3

Water content of the vegetables has little or nothing to do with Teflon deterioration. The reason you add wet vegetables after "dry" ones is that the water content of the wet vegatables will prevent the dry ones from searing and carmelizing. However, more to the point of the question, the way you should fry or saute vegetables in a non-stick pan is: Pour ...


3

Smoking oil generally isn't hot enough to damage teflon. Generally, Teflon gets damaged at 260C/500F, which is above the smoke point of most cooking oils (though not all of them). So as long as you didn't let it go to the point where you burned most of the oil off, it should be OK.


3

For people who believe that Teflon causes health issues and ceramic does not, ceramic becomes the better choice.


3

Personal preference. I own several frying pan from both materials, but the ceramic ones are much more elegant and beauty. Because of that, I only use it in special ocasions or when photographing.


3

I'd argue that you don't need any form of non-stick pan. But it can make some things easier ... frittata, crêpes, etc. And people who are on a low-fat diet may prefer non-stick pans so they can prepare their food without needing fats to keep it from sticking. You argue that teflon lasts longer than the newer non-stick ceramic pans, but like anything, how ...


2

Tomatoes specifically will not damage your teflon pan any more than any other cold, wet vegetable. Teflon was used to store a form of uranium in the Manhattan Project because it's so nonreactive. Without it, uranium hexafluoride would eat through storage containers. It sounds like you were also talking about thermal shock--which you can observe with a hot ...


2

The sauté pan is usually not very deep, is invariably round, and possesses either straight or sloped sides. For pans of this sort, ease of handling is given primacy because unlike other pans they’re intended to be handled a good deal during food preparation. Accordingly, in order to be lightweight as well as highly conductive, they’re typically made of ...


2

If your rice cooker has a warm setting then it is designed to be left on after cooking the rice. You can leave your rice in the bowl for days on warm and your teflon will be fine.


2

Ceramic pans are more non-stick than PTFE. They don't need oil. Ceramic pans are less durable. They fail within a few months of use. Ceramic pans don't scratch, they are too hard. No, don't throw it away. They don't contain the halogen elements found in PTFE. I wouldn't say so. Mine and my mother's failed earlier, and I've read many reports saying the ...


2

I can address a few of your points. Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) is the third most slippery substance known to man (the first two being incredibly expensive - an alloy of aluminum and Diamond-like carbon). There is nothing used in home cooking that is more non-stick. Teflon pans are NOT highly vulnerable to normal use with metallic utensils. Just don'...


2

Have never seen white teflon coating on cookware (even if white teflon exists in other applications); if you want to minimize exposure to teflon fumes in case of overheating accidents (eg if you have pet birds in the house), be aware that some ceramic lined pans have a teflon protected outside. Some black/grey/patterned "ceramic" coatings, however, seem to ...


2

The real solution to your problem is to switch to a carbon steel wok. You will never stop struggling as long as you're using a teflon-coated wok. You will always have to worry about overheating it. Teflon starts to degrade, giving off toxic gasses at 392F, and degrading irretrievably at around 500F. Whereas the minimum temperature you want for a wok ...


2

When heated to a high enough temperature (260C - 350C) Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) degrades into fumes that can cause flu-like symptoms. If you haven't experienced these symptoms and have aired out the room you should be fine. Even if you had these symptoms, they should clear up by themselves fairly quickly.


2

Short story, yes. It should be fine because most nonstick pans can go up to around 500°F (260°C) and still not be damaged. That doesn't mean you should make a habit out of it, you should try to avoid it getting to high temps especially while not cooking something in it.


1

Never bothered sticking them in a dishwasher as they are easy to clean in the sink. 2 rules I abide by in regards to them. Never use metal utensils with them. Silicone or wood only. Never overheat them. Stovetop only. Medium heat at most.


1

I would not use it given the fact that you will be using it to make a mixture for ice cream, pieces might end up in the mix. You can try it out a couple of times and if no parts fall out then should be good to go. Would not recommend to use it at a business but for personal use only.


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