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24

We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon. This is incorrect. Teflon (PTFE) itself is one of the most non-reactive substances you can use on cookware, in some ways better than ceramic. To quote Wikipedia: It is nonreactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and ...


11

I don't know where your information came from about "We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon", but it is incorrect. Teflon is the least chemically reactive material you are likely to encounter in daily life. There probably are a few substances that can react with it, but if you have a way of sourcing these, you hopefully won't be ...


8

First of all, a Teflon pan will get gradually ruined anyway. Even when you don't use oil, the heat and the food itself will wear out the coating, it is just very sensitive this way. Using oil will speed up the process. Second, both existing technologies for nonstick pans, PTFE (Teflon) and ceramic, will get ruined by oil. If you want to cook with olive oil ...


8

All Teflon pans are non-stick, but not all non-stick pans are Teflon ;-) Teflon, when new, is one of the slippiest substances known to man. Nothing will adhere to it, not even oil. When new, you can have a hard time getting an even coating of oil unless you make it deep enough to fill a base layer. The oil will be more attracted to itself than to the pan. ...


6

America's Test Kitchen says that good quality nonstick pans last them about six months. They're presumably cooking with them several times a day, so if you use it once every couple days, and are as good as they are about not doing things that'll damage the coating, you might get a few years. So your experience sounds roughly normal. As another data point, ...


6

Cast iron or carbon steel. Both require seasoning with oil and neither are non-stick immediately, but rather after seasoning and some use, the pans become more non-stick over time. But once they're properly seasoned, they're as non-stick or nearly as non-stick as teflon and the like. They do, however, require the use of fats in cooking. And they can last 30 ...


6

To best check temperature, you need a thermometer, and if you can, use a non-contact thermometer (infrared thermometer). Teflon start degrading at around 260 °C (500 °F). So check the pan temperature, adjust the heat of your range (electric, gas...) so that the temperature stay below that. If you want to use high temperature for some applications, then ...


5

It should be fine. The acidity of the vinegar would be an issue if it were to come into contact and react with bare metal. Non-stick cookware is fine for, say, making tomato sauces, etc, which means the coating in not especially reactive to acidity, which makes rice vinegar okay. As a confirming point, when I was walking through Costco yesterday, I saw ...


5

There is no current evidence that already-degraded PTFE (Teflon) poses any toxicity risks in its solid form. To quote the University of California School of Public Health: There’s no evidence, however, that in­gesting any PTFE flakes that might have degraded from the pan’s surface over time poses any health risk, and the American Cancer Society notes ...


5

I hope you're using cake release! And you've never actually "seasoned" it (as in covering it with oil and baking it in a very hot oven). If you did season it, that's a problem. I'll get to that in just a second. Otherwise, all you need is to wash the pan right away in hot soapy water (use a high-quality dish soap, ultra-cheap ones don't work as well) after ...


4

What I've found that works for any cake pan is to clean it immediately after removing the cake. Following my mother's example, as soon as I turn a cake (or layer) out, I wipe out any residue in the pan with a dry paper towel. This gets it out while it is still moist and before it has a chance to harden on the surface of the pan. Once it hardens, it can be ...


3

For people who believe that Teflon causes health issues and ceramic does not, ceramic becomes the better choice.


3

Have never seen white teflon coating on cookware (even if white teflon exists in other applications); if you want to minimize exposure to teflon fumes in case of overheating accidents (eg if you have pet birds in the house), be aware that some ceramic lined pans have a teflon protected outside. Some black/grey/patterned "ceramic" coatings, however, seem to ...


3

Smoking oil generally isn't hot enough to damage teflon. Generally, Teflon gets damaged at 260C/500F, which is above the smoke point of most cooking oils (though not all of them). So as long as you didn't let it go to the point where you burned most of the oil off, it should be OK.


3

From the T-FAL site: • Oven safe to 500°F/260°C if handles are all stainless steel. Oven safe to 350°F/175°C if handles have any phenolic, plastic parts. Oven safe to 400°F/204°C if handles have any silicone parts. So the pan itself should be fine, but the handles can be damaged. No need to toss it just because you're worried about the coating being ...


3

You asked for 'durable'. What's wrong with 'proper' traditional pressed steel? Sure they take a while to season in properly, but after that, they last a lifetime… or two… or three. I'm still using the ones my mum got in the 1950s. Every week for 60-some years. Never stick, never seem to age.


3

Personal preference. I own several frying pan from both materials, but the ceramic ones are much more elegant and beauty. Because of that, I only use it in special ocasions or when photographing.


3

I'd argue that you don't need any form of non-stick pan. But it can make some things easier ... frittata, crêpes, etc. And people who are on a low-fat diet may prefer non-stick pans so they can prepare their food without needing fats to keep it from sticking. You argue that teflon lasts longer than the newer non-stick ceramic pans, but like anything, how ...


2

The one alternative is ceramic pans. They are pretty awesome as long as they don't stick, much better than Teflon. However, they fail earlier, after maybe 6 months of regular, but not heavy, use. After that, they can still be used for cooking, but aren't really non-stick. They can stand much higher temperatures than Teflon (the manufacturers give them a 400 ...


2

The options for non-stick cookware that contain neither PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) nor PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene), the substances better known as Teflon, are limited. Most are ceramic, the general consensus on those (Consumer Reports, America's Test Kitchen, Amazon reviews, and rumtsho all seem to agree) is that the non-stick surface is great for a ...


2

The sauté pan is usually not very deep, is invariably round, and possesses either straight or sloped sides. For pans of this sort, ease of handling is given primacy because unlike other pans they’re intended to be handled a good deal during food preparation. Accordingly, in order to be lightweight as well as highly conductive, they’re typically made of ...


2

When heated to a high enough temperature (260C - 350C) Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) degrades into fumes that can cause flu-like symptoms. If you haven't experienced these symptoms and have aired out the room you should be fine. Even if you had these symptoms, they should clear up by themselves fairly quickly.


2

Ceramic pans are more non-stick than PTFE. They don't need oil. Ceramic pans are less durable. They fail within a few months of use. Ceramic pans don't scratch, they are too hard. No, don't throw it away. They don't contain the halogen elements found in PTFE. I wouldn't say so. Mine and my mother's failed earlier, and I've read many reports saying the ...


2

I can address a few of your points. Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) is the third most slippery substance known to man (the first two being incredibly expensive - an alloy of aluminum and Diamond-like carbon). There is nothing used in home cooking that is more non-stick. Teflon pans are NOT highly vulnerable to normal use with metallic utensils. Just don'...


2

Short story, yes. It should be fine because most nonstick pans can go up to around 500°F (260°C) and still not be damaged. That doesn't mean you should make a habit out of it, you should try to avoid it getting to high temps especially while not cooking something in it.


2

The real solution to your problem is to switch to a carbon steel wok. You will never stop struggling as long as you're using a teflon-coated wok. You will always have to worry about overheating it. Teflon starts to degrade, giving off toxic gasses at 392F, and degrading irretrievably at around 500F. Whereas the minimum temperature you want for a wok ...


2

You cannot use physical methods (scratching), so you are only left with the chemical ones. And for this kind of gunk, the only thing I know to work is a strong enough base. In the mildest cases, oven cleaner sprays might be sufficient. If not, somebody suggested ammonia in the comments, and then there is lye. The big problem is that any base strong enough to ...


1

Its not ideal, but it's fine. It's burned on oil or grease. If you haven't used it for a while, it can impart a slightly musty flavour to your food. A suggestion for cleaning - heat the pan whilst dry, then lightly spray with a cleaner & use a bristled brush to clean it whilst very hot.


1

I think the pan should be just fine to use because Teflon begins to deteriorate at temperatures of 500 degrees Fahrenheit or more according to the Wikipedia article on PTFE (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytetrafluoroethylene).


1

Never bothered sticking them in a dishwasher as they are easy to clean in the sink. 2 rules I abide by in regards to them. Never use metal utensils with them. Silicone or wood only. Never overheat them. Stovetop only. Medium heat at most.


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