56

From this link The key to slicing and portioning foie is to treat it like a rich mousse-cake: Make sure to heat up your knife under running water in between every slice. A cold knife will catch and stick in the foie, causing it to tear or crumble. A hot knife will melt the fat as it goes through, leaving you with clean, smooth surfaces to sear.


47

What is wrong with a regular ice cube? As you state that the tea is not yet ready, you just use slightly less water and then add the ice cube, which has a fixed temperature. I use this for large scale ice tea production. As I use 1:1 hot water : ice cubes I simply brew a double strong tea.


45

Ovens are by their nature a high-heat cooking method, and thus create a temperature gradient in the food. The outside of the item is the hottest, because it is in contact with the hot air, and exposed to the radiant (infrared) heat coming from the oven walls, ceiling and floor. Heat from the outside then conducts into the inside overtime. The effect of ...


39

There is lots of use for high temperatures. Especially pizza is the first thing that comes to mind; there is no home oven which can get to the proper temperatures for a Neapoletana (which are above 500 Celsius), but more is always better. Of course, the salesman will tell you what you need to hear to buy his product, don't listen to him. This still doesn't ...


38

As stated in another answer, Italian tradition is that all pasta is cooked in boiling water. A reasonable explanation for this usage is that it's easier to get the time right this way. Pasta is very sensitive to cooking time, and will easily turn from 'al dente' to an overcooked mush if left on the fire a couple of minutes too much. By cooking it in ...


37

One solution would be to use Whiskey Stones. These are essentially stone (or metal) cubes that you normally use for whiskey to chill it without diluting it. This will also work for your tea However, if this is a problem you run into regularly, you can freeze an ice tray with tea to make tea ice cubes and use that to cool down your tea. The main downside is, ...


33

Possibly even easier than using ice or fridges or anything... pour it repeatedly from one container to another. Constant exposure to the air will rapidly cool the drink, you can get it to drinking temperature in less than a minute. (Just make sure you pour accurately, or use larger containers. Spilling hot tea is no fun.) Here's an example of a street ...


32

For dried pasta it doesn’t really matter if you start with cold or hot water, as most of the time pasta spends in water is for hydration. And once the hydrated starches reach a certain temperature they gelatinize, thus cooking the pasta. When you start with cold water, you should use less water, which is actually a plus... Note: I forgot to mention, you ...


31

If by “noodles“ you mean pasta that comes in the dry form with or without eggs, then yes, you can make that in the slow cooker. There is one caveat though: other than your meat, which won’t be affected by a bit of extra cooking time, pasta tends to become soggy rather quickly - or, at least “quickly“ in slow cooker time. After 30 minutes, plus minus a bit, ...


30

The "browning" or "coloring" of food during cooking and baking1 is a reaction of temperature and/or time. As a rule of thumb, the hotter your pan or oven, the faster the food will brown. There are two chemical reactions (or rather chains of reactions) that play a significant role in cooking: The Maillard reaction, which affects proteins (-> browning a ...


29

Water is a great solvent for polar molecules. Sugar, table salt, and other small polar molecules are water soluble. When you put them into water, you get a sugar resp. salt solution. Other molecules are not soluble in water. Most organic molecules with a carbohydrate tail are insoluble (unless they have a strongly polar active group, like the shorter ...


28

The Maillard reaction can occur at a wide range of temperatures, but the lower limit is not well-defined. It can even occur at room temperature, providing some flavoring components (for example) to ripening cheeses and Seranno ham. At high temperatures (over 300°F/150°C), it will noticeably occur on many foods in a matter of minutes, so you can actually ...


28

I made myself some spicy chicken and macaroni soup, and put it in a bowl while it was still boiling. I put a thermometer in it as it cooled and I started to eat. I figured the soup was a good thing to test as I could take big bites that included liquid and solids that required chewing. I took a bite every minute or so and noted the temperature, and I ...


28

While I suspect that the formula is mostly reliable if you repeat the experiment with the same person, I found the individual heat sensitivity varies a lot. Most professional cooks and seasoned homemakers can handle (pun intended) higher heat than those who rarely expose their hands to high temperatures. In our home, we’ve had heated discussions about ...


26

Couldn't I just use a lower temperature setting? No, you can't. Ovens are very bad at keeping a constant temperature. Not only is the oven thermostat usually off, it also cycles around its mean temperature a lot. So your food is subjected to constantly changing temperature. If you were to set your oven to 100C, you 1) won't get really 100C, and 2) won't ...


25

The same phenomenon occurs with tomato sauce on pizza, or vegetables in a casserole: the moist filling feels much, much hotter than surrounding crust or noodles. In short, this phenomenon is caused by differing thermal properties of the materials involved. The quoted excerpts below (from PhysLink.com) provide some explanation of the physics involved, and I'...


21

The proteins in egg white and egg yolk behave differently at different temperatures. It is an ingredient that responds to very subtle temperature variations. That is why it is a favorite item to cook for those of us interested in low-temperature cooking using an immersion circulator (sous vide). However, predating the immersion circulator, the Japanese ...


19

Yes, it is normal for pulses to develop froth when soaked. I've seen it at lower temperatures and shorter soaking times. They can feel slimy too. This isn't a sign of bacteria development in itself. Chickpeas, as well as other legumes, contain lots of saponins. Saponins are a type of detergent, and they form a foam when dissolved in water. An example is ...


19

I do this everyday before I leave for work. I can't have really hot tea. So once my tea is ready: I put it in a tea pan (a deep pan used to make tea). You can substitute with any other clean deep pan. Add cold water to the kitchen sink Stand the tea pan in the kitchen sink for 2-4 minutes And I have the perfect temperature for my tea that suits me :) You ...


18

Personally, I would argue that 2 and 3 are actually the same, and they are your answer. If you heat a pan of water you'll notice the bubbles forming before the water is actually boiling, hence the talk of between not bubbling and full on roiling. Also, when you're making your soup, it isn't pure water, so the boiling temp will not be a perfect 100 degrees ...


18

Most likely the flatbread is not very pliable when cold. I believe that Subway forces the heating of the flatbread to keep it from splitting when they fold it.


18

The reduction of bacterial growth, and thus food safety, follow a logarithmic pattern that factors in temperature plus time. During sous vide cooking, lower temperature are frequently used for longer times. Employed correctly, this renders food safe. For an excellent explanation see the work of Douglas Baldwin.


17

First, buy a thermometer, they're cheap. This one topped America's Test Kitchen testing: Thermometer Barring taking the plunge and spending $6 on an oven thermometer, this method comes straight from an online class I'm taking from Harvard through edX.org. Course Description To test the oven, you can either use an oven thermometer, or you can find a ...


16

Colloquially, simmer means to maintain a liquid at a temperature where relatively few, small vapor bubbles form, while boil means to maintain a liquid at a temperature where relatively many, large vapor bubbles form. If the liquid is being stirred, the temperature of the liquid will be at its boiling point (100°C for distilled water, depending on ...


16

There are several things in general that you can do to increase the speed at which food cools down, but two of the most effective are: Increase the surface area. Spread it in a wide, shallow pan, like a sheet pan, rather than a deep pot. This will allow more cooling. Use an ice water bath. Place the container with the food into an ice water bath, being ...


16

What happens to bread when it is done Yes, there is something particular what happens at a temperature in the mid-90s. Not all details of it are proven, but the major outline is, and the hypotheses about the details are solid enough to make it into textbooks. Starch is contained in tiny granules, a few micrometers in diameter. When heated in the ...


16

What you call a "modern picnic cool box", I assume, is also known as a "cooler" in other parts of the world. This is generally a well-insulated, most often plastic, container. It could be hard-sided or made of soft material. The container and insulation is designed to maintain a consistent temperature. So, cold things remain colder longer, but also hot ...


15

It is impossible to convert Microwaves into Celsius or Fahrenheit. Temperature(Celsius): Temperature is a measure of the average translational kinetic energy of the molecules of a system. Heat is commonly expressed in either of two units: the calorie, an older metric unit, and the British thermal unit (Btu), an English unit commonly used in the United ...


15

SUMMARY: Unless I'm missing something here or you're doing very odd things with your refrigerator, you'd at most save a couple dollars per year by keeping your fridge/freezer full. Moreover, stocking up on water (or other things) to fill up fridge/freezer space won't save you much at all unless you're keeping it stored there for a VERY long time, since it ...


15

Pour the tea back and forth between two cups until the desired temperature. Adjusting the height of pouring is fun to play with to get faster results but try it over a kitchen sink.


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