New answers tagged

1

A lot of spreadable products won't be if chilled, as the fats harden. Peanut butter is one (though how much it stiffens depends on the presence of other fats than the oil from the peanuts). Nutella stored in the fridge becomes hard enough to bend cutlery when you try to get it out. Olive oil goes cloudy and thickens but doesn't come to any harm, though it's ...


3

Besides the issues already mentioned, you should also beware of storing some dry goods in the fridge, especially if you live in a high-humidity area. Basically, every time you open the container outside of the fridge, you will exchange it for more humid air. In the fridge, the moisture will condense. If you're storing something in amounts similar to the ...


2

Many food items, particularly those containing oils, but many others too, will change characteristics when cold. The good news is that keeping honey and most other things at fridge temperature does not generally affect flavour, but it may affect texture permanently. Oils and other substances that can go rancid will generally keep better in the fridge than at ...


0

Unless your mouldy food was simply leftovers left too long, then you have a more serious issue of cross-contamination. Toast crumbs in the butter, marmite or honey will do that & so will many things far less visible. If you have either cause you will first need to fully clean the fridge, then start over with better working practices. As you've noticed, ...


4

That's not how it works. Most electrics are induction these days, which heat through magnetic fields. They impart energy to the metal of the pan, heating the metal directly. Traditional heating coils or halogens create actual heat, the temperature that food or water reaches in any electric system including induction varies significantly on the: Size and ...


8

Absolutely not, this cannot be built. There is a reason sous vide is called sous vide and not sous PID. Cooktops are, by design, a device that emits a constant amount of energy (oversimplified) into the surrounding space, which is the opposite of what you need for keeping a constant internal temperature in a chicken breast. If you would build a cooktop with ...


1

If it is non-magnetic (304) it could be sensitized at about 1100 F (very dim red heat) which would reduce corrosion resistance to boiling brine. If it is magnetic (410), I can't imagine you could hurt it in the oven or surface burners. It could ruin bakelite handles. So there is no way you can damage any stainless in a home oven .


5

Yes, heating to boiling temperature will destroy amylase. Depending on the ratio, the goal of that recipe may be to destroy the enzymes, to gel the starch, or to help the enzymes be most effective. It’s not uncommon for particularly old and traditional recipes to use a combination of boiling water, ice-cold water, and room-temperature ingredients to reach a ...


5

It's really not about temperature at all. "While it's still hot" is a great description of when to do it, but it's not why. You want to salt fried food when it's straight from the oil, because the surface is still wet with oil. This ensures that the salt sticks to the surface of the food. As the food sits, the surface will dry (it cools off at the ...


1

Best? That would be The Control Freak. However, the downside is that it is fairly expensive.


1

If your amount of syrup is not more than a few liters, you could get a laboratory hot plate (disclaimer: this was just the first link that appeared to me) with temperature control. They exist with temperature feelers, and many support magnetic stirring, too. (I had this idea because I remember a school experiment where we created fructose-glucose syrup from ...


2

If you need to maintain a certain temperature over time, this is the domain of sous vide cookers. They are typically made for proteins, so if you cannot find one that goes to 90 C, you can use a homemade setup instead (controller + drop-in heater + small pump). It will serve you much better than any purpose-made device, unless you can find something exactly ...


6

It is entirely possible that your oven runs hot, many ovens do. But right now, you cannot say anything about it. A single temperature measurement at the tenth minute is a pretty useless piece of information. What your oven does is to turn its heater full-blast on, then off, in a predetermined pattern (the whole time, the oven indicates that it is "...


4

The temperature of boiling water is 100° Celsius or 212° Fahrenheit. This is considerably colder than the self-cleaning cycle in your oven. It would be perfectly sufficient to set the oven temperature to about 120°C/240°F to heat the tray. It would not take long to reach the desired temperature for the tray at those lower temperatures since metals conduct ...


20

Sadly, yes. Your oven most likely has been running too hot for a while and now that you are actually measuring it, you noticed it. We have a lot of Q/As on the site that recommend using a separate oven thermometer whenever an oven behaves strangely. Thermostats can fail or be generally incorrect, like too hot or too cool. Plus many ovens fluctuate quite a ...


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