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What you're seeing is called chocolate bloom. It doesn't happen because of tempering, it happens in spite of it (or sometimes due to improper tempering). Sugar bloom is pretty straightforward - it happens due to moisture exposure (e.g. condensation) causing dissolution and re-crystalizing of the sugar on top. You can easily check if you have sugar bloom by ...


10

Yes, you absolutely can (Lindt dark chocolate bars work just fine). Whether you can temper chocolate is simply a matter of whether there's enough cocoa butter (the fat that is actually crystallizing during the tempering process). You will want to have at least ~30% cocoa butter by mass if you want to temper the chocolate, but even 20% will work. When you ...


9

Absolutely. I do it all the time, with great results. The easiest way at home is to 'seed' the chocolate. Get it up to the proper temperature as best you can - 115 °F/46 °C for dark, 110 °F/43 °C for others. A thermometer obviously makes this easier. If you don't have one, it will be just melted. Doing this in the microwave is ...


6

Chocolate milk is frequently made with either chocolate syrup (which has no fat) or a powdered mix of cocoa powder and sugar (which has almost no fat) for precisely this reason. You can make it with chocolate by sprinkling very finely grated chocolate into hot milk, but you still run the risk of the fat separating.


5

Tempering is a process used to give solid chocolate a uniform appearance and texture, as well as to insure that those qualities are shelf-stable. Most commercially available chocolate is already tempered to some degree so that it has a pleasing appearance and texture for customers to enjoy right out of the box/bag. Tempering is required when the final ...


5

If it has a shiny/reflective surface and doesn't melt or bloom (much) at room temperature or hand temperature, then it's already tempered. Virtually every packaged chocolate is already tempered. Untempered chocolate generally needs to be refrigerated for longer-term storage, so if a package doesn't specify refrigeration (and I've never seen one that does), ...


5

To answer your last question: yes. Regarding the previous question, it's because the temperature at which the cocoa butter in the chocolate crystallizes affects the overall consistency of the chocolate. If you've ever eaten a chocolate bar that was left in a car on a hot day after it has cooled down again, and who hasn't, you'll know about this. Sometimes ...


5

A characteristic of untempered chocolate is that it melts more easily. That's generally considered bad--if you pick it up in your hand, your hand gets sticky and the surface of the chocolate gets marred. But it also means that you get stronger flavor more quickly when you put it in your mouth. If you are designing a confection where that is the intent, ...


5

My best guess is that the chocolate was too hot. It may have worked on your test because it was small and thin, and therefore cooled quickly. In the larger molds, it stayed too warm and you got the wrong kind of crystals from the cocoa butter. You want the keep the chocolate as close to 88 °F (~ 32 °C) as you can get. What I typically do is microwave 3/4 ...


4

You can score and snap. You make a shallow score in the chocolate using a knife or other sharp object (gentle!). Then you snap it. It works better on harder chocolates. Since all I have around the house this instant is a leftover halloween candy, I'll show the sequence here, but with this soft chocolate it would be easier to actually cut it through... 1)...


4

Yes, it is too much. Chocolate has very tight working intervals. Dark chocolate must be used at 32°C. Below 30°C, it is too thick for use, and at 35°C, the cocoa butter separates from the chocolate. An error interval of 4°C when your complete workable interval is 5°C wide is simply unacceptable. You want a thermometer with a much higher precision, actually ...


4

Most chocolate you buy are already tempered(the ones with real cocao butter) but when you melt the chocolate so you can work with it, you must temper it again. I found this great article on allrecipe in regards to this. It gives step by step information about melting and tempering chocolate. http://allrecipes.com/howto/tempering-chocolate/


4

Keep in mind that if you mess up tempering of 'fine chocolate', you can always heat it back up and do it again. All you are doing is trying to make one of the three types of chocolate crystals the dominant one, and form the crystal lattice. This article chocolate alchemy describes it. In practice, having a fast digital hand thermometer is really helpful ...


4

One of the reasons is what cantido probably meant: you can overheat the eggs quickly if you pour them into the hot milk. Heat transfer is proportional to the distance from the boundary between the two materials. If you pour a thin stream of hot milk into tepid eggs, most of the eggs don't get heated, because they are far away from the boundary. They only ...


4

Chocolate will stay fresh for weeks or even months if stored correctly. And yes, the spheres will stay as shiny and beautiful as you made them if you store them correctly: in a cool, dark place away from sunlight but not necessarily in the fridge - taking them out will lead to condensation on the surface at rather constant temperature and dry. So in ...


4

To answer you points: However I didn't want to go with organic milk because I know that organic milk separates into water and cream. If the milk is homogenized, it would be incredibly difficult to separate the cream and skim in your kitchen. Organic has nothing to do with separation, only husbandry practices (cow raising, feed, and lack of antibiotics.) ...


4

You cannot use sugar unless you do not mind having crunchy sugar crystals. There is no way of sweetening chocolate by adding sugar, even powdered sugar, without a conche. I think if the cacao contents are not too dissimilar, you should be fine. I have got away with 70% seeding 85%, but I cannot tell you whether you could get away with any mix. You can also ...


4

There's quite some bitter components in there: Fenugreek Nigella seeds Mustard seeds In general to balance bitterness, you either add salt, fat, or sugar. In yours case, maybe the addition of the mustard seeds pushed the bitterness just beyond what you like. So quite possibly you could also choose to reduce the amount of nigella seeds and fenugreek.


4

Tempering chocolate is ensuring melted chocolate has a nice shine and there are a few methods to do that: add grains of unmelted chocolate and stir (which is the seeding method you're referring to) let it cool down while stirring (which is the most labour-intensive method, but the easiest to do if you've never done this before) which answers all of your ...


4

The general rule of thumb is to put spices that burn easily in the end. Black mustard seeds are often added, in which case add the mustard seeds to hot oil first. Once the mustard seeds stop popping, turn the heat down, add urad dal (white lentil), dried red chillies, cumin, and turmeric. Of course, your tadka may not have all ingredients that I've listed (...


3

From your comment: I dip the bars into melted chocolates and roll, using a fork. If you want to coat something in chocolate, you typically need much more chocolate than you expect. The height of the chocolate should be high enough to submerge the praline or bar without rolling, otherwise you start to loose material - as you noticed. Simply dip, lift out (...


3

What we know from the Federal Standards of Identity for Cacao Products is that there is at least 35% cocoa mass (which can include cocoa butter), and no more than 12% milk fat (by weight) in a product labeled semi-sweet chocolate, which includes the Nestle morsels. We also know from the Nestle label listing sugar first that it is the most plentiful ...


3

If you melt tempered chocolate it loses it's tempering completely and you'll need to do it all again. There's no point in pre-tempering chocolate for storage as there's no benefit if you're going to melt and re-use it.


3

The point of tempering chocolate is heating it before it "breaks" - thus tempered chocolate has that "snap" to it you always want to keep intact. If you've done your tempering (understand melting) correctly there is nothing to worry about. Work the chocolate as long as you can - meaning as long as its pliability caters to your needs. Once that train has ...


3

The recommended temperature is 20°C. This is 12 to 13 degrees Celsius difference to the actual chocolate temperature. 1-2 degrees deviation will not be a problem, but more than that and you will get subpar results. This temperature should ideally be the same on all sides of the new chocolate shape. This means, if you are covering something in chocolate, ...


3

I know there is already an accepted answer here, but I thought I would fill in some more precise details (although they might not be super-helpful for the casual, at-home chocolate maker). When chocolatiers need to temper chocolate and they don't have any already-tempered chocolate, the technique they use is a bit more specialized than to stir it while it ...


3

This YouTube video from America's Test Kitchen doesn't exactly address your question, but I think it hits it on the periphery towards the end. Summary: Dan (the chef) goes over the traditional way of tempering chocolate (much like the method you link to / describe). Then, he goes over their shortcut version. In the shortcut, most of the chocolate is ...


3

I am not an expert in tempering, but I think the long standing time at 33˚C can contribute to V crystals reforming as VI (after all, they do this at room temperature over time). If this happened then it would cause the tempered chocolate to thicken and require melting and tempering again. Will look forward to more answers on this.


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It is certainly safer to re-temper chocolate, but it is possible to melt chocolate without letting it go 'out of temper'. The typical upper bound for working with tempered chocolate is 90 F (32 C) for dark chocolate. Using a double-boiler (or an improvised equivalent), it is possible to melt chocolate to a workable state without going over this temperature. ...


2

I heard of chocolate bars which are eaten in hotter regions (by soldiers?). The chocolate is brittle, dry and doesn't melt in the mouth. To prevent the eater trying to let the piece of chocolate melt in the mouth the chocolate should be mixed with ingredients that should be chewed anyway - like nuts. I assume that this kind of chocolate is not tempered. I ...


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