4

The general rule of thumb is to put spices that burn easily in the end. Black mustard seeds are often added, in which case add the mustard seeds to hot oil first. Once the mustard seeds stop popping, turn the heat down, add urad dal (white lentil), dried red chillies, cumin, and turmeric. Of course, your tadka may not have all ingredients that I've listed (...


3

I am not an expert in tempering, but I think the long standing time at 33˚C can contribute to V crystals reforming as VI (after all, they do this at room temperature over time). If this happened then it would cause the tempered chocolate to thicken and require melting and tempering again. Will look forward to more answers on this.


3

This YouTube video from America's Test Kitchen doesn't exactly address your question, but I think it hits it on the periphery towards the end. Summary: Dan (the chef) goes over the traditional way of tempering chocolate (much like the method you link to / describe). Then, he goes over their shortcut version. In the shortcut, most of the chocolate is ...


2

If you stop the process at 29˚C, you simply won't have hard chocolate. Seeds of type V crystal will have formed, but most of the chocolate will still be liquid. What you do once you lower the temperature below 29˚ is encourage the rest of the chocolate to solidify. If you follow the right temperature curve, the crystal seeds that formed at 29 (Type V) will ...


2

Interesting question, but for practical purposes, I think it is a dead end. If you want something resembling a Lindt chocolate bar, you cannot make it at home. You just don't have the machinery needed to create the needed particle size of the starchy phase. There is by the way no "cocoa mass containing no cocoa butter or trace amounts of it", the best you ...


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