16

You don't need to substitute anything, you can just leave it out. I've made both regular and cornbread stuffing with and without celery and I've never felt it was missing anything without celery, in fact I personally prefer it. Celery will release moisture as it cooks, I've found that I can compensate for it by adding a small amount more stock or water at ...


10

There's so much heat around a turkey deep-fryer I wouldn't see how light or medium snow would affect your cooking. Any snow is going to melt and probably evaporate before it comes into contact with any hot oil, and any that makes contact will be gone in a flash. I've barbequed in 20 below and in snow, all that it really means is that you need more heat. My ...


8

I heard GR say 3 hours this year too, so you're not misremembering. I recently started letting it rest for 45 minutes to an hour, and it's worked out great. My reason for choosing that amount of time is: that's how long veggies need to roast in the oven. Once upon a time I used to rest it for 30 min, meaning I needed to at least start roasting the veg while ...


8

In my experience, the stalks of swiss chard have a very similar mouthfeel to celery. I find the stalks more fibrous, but that shouldn't be a problem given you'll be cooking them. Chard is a member of the beet family, whereas celery is a member of the parsley family, so it might not cause the same allergic reaction you experience with celery.


7

The oven in a standard 20" kitchen stove will accommodate a bird even as large as 20 lbs (9 kg). The very detailed chart here, the pertinent details of which are replicated in the chart below, establish the standard dimensions of such an oven as 18 X 16 X 14.5 inches (46 x 41 x 37 cm). In their downloadable Thanksgiving pdf, for a turkey as large as 20 lbs ...


6

Ignoring food safety for a moment referring to an example like How Clothes Dryers Work in most dryers air enters near the top, is heated by an element at the rear of the dryer but the air is actually being drawn in / out by a fan at the bottom of the unit. The internal temperature of the air ends up being about 175C so most of what is "floating around" in ...


6

Some of this is a matter of opinion, as you must decide what type of apple pie you like. Do you want one with discernable applie slices, or one where the filling becomes somewhat like apple sauce? Kenji Alt of Serious Eats has done an in depth review of 10 commonly available apples (at least in the US), and his conclusion is: [...] the best ones in the ...


5

I'm not expert on Kosher thing, but what about using chicken schmaltz?


5

The second item needs to be in the oven for 15 minutes more than the first item. Just put that item in the oven, then put the second item in 15 minutes later. Follow all other procedures as indicated in the instructions. The required cooking temperature is the same for both. I am assuming that cooking from frozen is built into the instructions, so that ...


4

What happens if you brine something for a long time depends on the concentration of your brine, much like temperature affects what happens when you cook something for long. Thus, you can apply equilibrium brining and brine your meat for a longer time in a less concentrated solution. I haven't tried it, but according to linked source you'll get desired ...


4

I've been letting my turkey rest for over 2-3 hours for a couple years now because of this advice from Gordon. It's amazing! I cover with tin foil and then a couple of towels to rest and the bird is still PIPING hot hours later. I'm usually cooking a 25 pounder. The internal temperature actually first goes UP to 180 then settles back to 150 by serving time. ...


4

Granny Smith is the standard go-to. I think the best pies use a combination of apples. Alton Brown likes a combination of Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Braeburn and Golden Delicious. I love Granny Smith and Honeycrisp for out-of-hand eating, so I often have those on hand when I get a hankering for baking. A combination of those two apples do make for a great ...


4

I work in a deli and over the holidays we cook and debone a lot of turkeys. I can tell you from experience that a 20# turkey will yield about 8-10 pounds of meat. This is because when the turkey cooks it releases a surprising amount of liquid. Add in all the bones and you loose a lot of your starting weight. So you really do want to figure 1 1/2 to 2 pounds ...


4

I am from Eastern Pennsylvania, where we call it "Filling". Good luck convincing the rest of the world, though. I catch crap for it all the time. Filling, Stuffing, Dressing....It's all the same, regional dialects aside.


4

Pre-basted turkey is indeed already brined. You can double check this by looking on the ingredient list of the turkey packaging and you should see a salt or vinegar solution listed. You can still soak the bird if you would like, but either use no salt or a low-salt brine, like a 0.5-1% solution. In this case you will probably be pulling out some of the salt ...


4

There is a shelf-like thing some dryers have that you can attach to the back for drying shoes. The shelf doesn't move, the items on the shelf don't move, and the otherwise empty dryer revolves around it so there is warm air flowing etc. If you did this, and the turkey was sitting on a tray to collect juices that dripped from it, then I think the dryer would ...


3

MetroKitchens suggests that for a 17-20 lb bird, you need a roasting pan that is 16 x 13 x 3 inches (about 41 x 33 x 8cm). The oven will need to be taller than the pan, because a turkey sticks out above a roasting pan, but you can reduce that considerably by spatchcocking the bird. I'm bad at estimating visually, but I think it'd be around 6-10 inches (15-...


3

We found a 7lb turkey which, for the three of us, gave almost no leftovers. So clearly the 1-lb per person measure breaks down at sufficiently small numbers of people :(


3

I have brined mine over night and also like 2 to 3 days. I have to say the majority of the recipies that I read all say to brine it over nite, but the turkey that I brined for 2 to 3 days was the best I have ever had. Same recipie that I used for the over night brine. A cup of kosher salt per gallon of water or liquid, (vegetable stock or chicken stock or ...


3

Having found this question on the Stack Overflow blog - I feel compelled to add a UK perspective. Looking at Kenji Alt's list of apples, I find there are only probably three on there I've ever seen in the UK. Here they are in what I would consider worst to best order... Golden Delicious - there was a massive influx of these cardboard/floury-flavoured apples ...


3

Cooler Thawing At home we thaw our turkey in a cooler in the tub. This keeps the water cooler longer, frees up the sink, completely submerges the turkey. Make sure to thoroughly clean the cooler before and after with antibacterial dish-washing soap. The turkey has to be tightly sealed with no leaks. The tissues absorb water and consistency of meat will ...


3

Fennel By which I mean the vegetable - fennel bulb, not fennel seed. Substitute fennel for all the celery. It is a good fall vegetable and has a great crunch and flavor for stuffing. Fennel stalks actually look and crunch kind of like celery and so will not be weird interlopers. https://foodprint.org/blog/how-to-use-fennel-stalks-and-fronds/


3

While the term has gained popularity, "dry brining" isn't really a thing. This is going to ruffle some feathers (pun intended), but brining happens in a wet environment. It's definition is a "cure dissolved in water." When there is not water, it is "salting." So, what you have is a salted turkey. (I know...semantics. Sorry, ...


2

This is not directly answering your question, but do you need the "turkey" at all? The consensus in our family is that the thing which defines a Thanksgiving dinner isn't the turkey but the astounding number of side dishes. So we have sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, gravy to put on them (mushroom-based), green bean casserole, homemade cranberry ...


2

Yes, it is possible to thaw a turkey in the dryer. Though the process will likely render both unusable. The motor will likely be strong enough to turn the drum with the frozen turkey in it. As the frozen turkey tumbles, it could dent the drum beyond the clearance of the enclosure and wear out the pulleys (cannonball). PeterJ's answer addresses the ...


2

I would actually recommend you remove the breasts, regardless of when you will be cooking them. It is very difficult to get the duck breasts to a perfect 125–130°F, the legs to ~15° hotter, and to simultaneously render excess fat and crisp the skin when roasting the bird whole. Cooking the individual muscles separately greatly simplifies this. Also, with ...


2

Using olive oil to brush the turkey is a good kosher substitute (due to the prohibition of eating poultry and dairy together). In general, margarine has been used in the past as a butter substitute, but nowadays, most kosher recipes do not use margarine, which has unhealthful fats. They either use canola, olive or coconut oil in baking. For meats and poultry,...


1

General Electric (http://products.geappliances.com/appliance/gea-support-search-content?contentId=18680) says: • A 30" Freestanding Range will hold a turkey about 24-26 lbs. • A 30" Freestanding Double Oven Range (lower oven) will hold a turkey about 20 lbs. Note: The turkeys we test are normally in the 20-25lb range, and in those cases we use the ...


1

As long as the turkey stayed reasonably cold throughout its hour outside the fridge, you should be fine. Safety regs usually state that meat should not be at room temperature for more than 2 hours throughout its 'lifetime'. As you defrosted in the fridge and then under cold running water for an hour, and assuming you placed it straight back in the fridge, ...


1

No, you cannot turn this mixture into a mousse. You have to eat it as it is - which is probably simply a tasty creamy pudding without the expected mousselike consistency. Even if it is grainy, there is no reason not to eat it that way. Unless you find it utterly impalatable, in which case you have to throw it away. It is normal to expect some failures with ...


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