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34

reference: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/conductive-heat-transfer-d_428.html Let's take a moment to look at the heat transfer equation. Looking at it, we can see the ways to get more efficient heat transfer q / A = k dT / s q / A = heat transfer per unit area (W/m2) k = thermal conductivity (W/mK) dT = temperature difference (oC) s = wall thickness (...


29

That's not how it happens. Turkey can be labeled "fresh" as in -never frozen- even if the turkey is held at temperatures below freezing. By law, 26F (-3.33C) is the cutoff in the US. If the turkey spends weeks at 27F, it can still be labeled fresh even though it would be considered frozen to any of us mere mortals. So, if a turkey has spent 2 weeks at 27F, ...


17

How nice to have a question I can just answer. I remember the ads for that thing. You can still buy it, it is called The Miracle Thaw. Now there are knock offs. I am so pleased that you didn't ask how. It's too close to my bedtime for that.


15

Safely? Yes. Cold water thaws are fine. It's hot or warm water thawing that's bad. Cold running water will thaw faster than cold still water, but cold still water is okay as you basically have a giant ice cube in the water (the thing you're thawing), so the water stays at a safe temperature until you're towards the end of the thaw ... it just takes a ...


14

Three possibilities that I can think of: If the water weren't cool enough and they were big shrimp, it could raise them to a temperature at which bacteria could develop. If the water were actually warm or hot, it could start to cook the shrimp. If the shrimp were defrosted directly under water, not in a bag, they could absorb some of the water and the ...


14

Welcome to Seasoned Advice. The real truth is that most "fresh" turkeys are not fresh at all. Especially in the case of branded birds that are shipped en masse. The turkeys are most often shipped to markets frozen and they are thawed when placed for sale. (I have been inside of back room freezers and have seen them stocked there.) I have actually seen them ...


13

I like chef Ramsay, he can be snobbish and course at times but he knows food and he's a straight shooter and tells it like it is. Sometimes he's just saying the food isn't hot or even warm in the middle, but some times he is referring to frozen vs fresh ingredients. Most food is better when it's fresh, because freezing destroys cell walls and breaks down ...


10

reference: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/conductive-heat-transfer-d_428.html Let's take a moment to look at the heat transfer equation. Looking at it, we can see the ways to get more efficient heat transfer q / A = k dT / s q / A = heat transfer per unit area (W/m2) k = thermal conductivity (W/mK) dT = temperature difference (oC) s = wall thickness (...


9

The difference between cold and frozen where a refrigerator is concerned is actually only a few Kelvin (or "degrees"). The standard refrigerator will have warmer and colder zones, typically the top shelf being warmer, the bottom shelf above the veggie drawer cooler. Likewise the back is usually cooler than the front. The temperature you set it to is an ...


8

Update Jeff Axelrod commented (much thanks) that the Costco IQF shrimp come with most of the shell removed. In that case, "DO NOT FORCE THAW UNDER RUNNING WATER" most likely means if you do it, you'll end up with "shrimp pulp" with some of it even down the drain. The shrimp can absorb the water and get mushy and disintegrate. This, I have seen in our ...


7

Freezing doesn’t reset the clock, it’s more like “stopping the time” - or at least slowing it down very, very much. Like putting perishable food in the fridge and slowing down bacterial growth, freezing the food brings it to a full stop. But unlike heating, cooling or freezing does not kill bacteria. What went in the freezer comes out again, ready to ...


6

Any perishable food (in this case I would be concerned about the ham more than anything) left at room temperature for more than 2 hours should be considered unsafe, even after cooking. Considering we're talking about a frozen pizza and not a full beef fillet, why take the risk? If it's been in the fridge, however, you may be ok.


6

There are a few more problems with frozen ingredients that might not be obvious at first: The cut of the ingredients is usually already defined by how the factory did it, and might or might not be as desired, be it for textural, cooking behaviour, or presentation reasons. There is always more free water in what you pour out of a freezer bag versus what ...


6

Either you've insulated it or your fridge is really cold. I suggest using a thermometer to check your fridge temperature. Parts of your fridge may be at slightly different temperatures than other parts; it may help to move it to a warmer part of the fridge (if that can be done safely, you don't want it dripping on your produce, for example). You could use ...


5

I don't know anything about the laws regarding what can be labeled as "fresh", but to answer your actual question, no, meat (or anything else) won't freeze from the inside, out. The meat would freeze or thaw from the outside, in. I suppose one could put some sort of hot or cold probe that was above/below freezing into the center of the meat. Then it would ...


4

After a few days, they're almost certainly still safe. Most fresh vegetables will last a few days to a week in the refrigerator. The quality might not be amazing, though. Frozen vegetables tend to get limp and soggy when they thaw; after a few days of being in the refrigerator, they might very well turn to mush once you cook them. But the chances of food ...


4

No, you can never restore a fruit or vegetable to its original texture after thawing. Physically, this is caused by the water in its cells expanding and bursting the cell walls. When it thaws, the water flows out of the damaged cell walls. It is not actually pure water, but cytoplasm, so it can feel differently from plant to plant, in this case slimy. It is ...


4

Miracle thaws, also known as defrosting trays, are simply chunks of metal with a high coefficient of heat transfer. Materials that have a high thermal conductivity transfer heat more efficiently than those with a low conductivity. Aluminum is cheap and has a high thermal conductivity relative to other materials, so most are made of that material. However, ...


4

The biggest loser when IQF shrimp are "force defrosted" is diminished flavor profile and loss of texture (or mouth feel - they should have a certain resistance to the bite). There is no danger of any food safety issues when force thawed. The very best way to thaw any IQF shrimp of any size and style is to leave them in the bag, put the bag in a bowl, and ...


4

Yes, it should be. That is - if it has been thawed, and safely stored (refrigerated, or in safe temperatures in whatever way), then it should still be safe to eat. If it has been left out on a counter, or in otherwise unsafe conditions for more than a few hours - then it is as unsafe as the conditions have made it, and it is your decision what you will ...


4

It's fine to thaw for a few (or several) hours under cold water and then put it in the refrigerator. Just keep the water cold and refrigerate immediately upon removing the turkey from the water. The USDA and Butterball are being extremely overly conservative, most likely because a lot of people are really bad at following instructions. Cold water good - warm ...


4

This can be safe; mixing isn't fundamentally dangerous. The things to keep in mind are: The overall thawing method needs to be safe. Ideally that means running water, but the key is that it's fast enough to avoid spending too long in the danger zone. A bowl of water is likely too slow, though it can be fast enough if the water is agitated and changed ...


4

I'll agree with other Joe on the safety side of things: as long as the water didn't get much above 40° Fahrenheit, which it won't until after it's thawed, you're fine. As far as the water getting in the cling wrap: that's where I tend to have more worries. I sous-vide a lot, and the worst thing to happen there is for water to get into the bag. Water that'...


4

This sounds like a lot of time and effort, that, for home use, might not be worth it. Freezing as quickly as possible is generally recommended, but even with an ice bath first, you are not going to be able to freeze quickly enough to make that much of an impact using a home freezer. At home we have more control over how a product is thawed. For example, ...


3

While thawing items under cool running water is a quick method done in just about every restaurant that uses frozen items, it has a side effect of giving you a less than desired end product. Basically the quality goes down. Water is absorbed into the item, the flowing water can damage the item texture yada yada yada. Best to thaw in the fridge as a rule ...


3

If your fridge has a meat compartment, that often runs at very slightly above freezing - so slight it would take several days to thaw. In the rest of the fridge, meat frozen to -18C (typical) will still take quite a while. Polystyrene tray packaging (used to be common here in the UK, much less so now) is a good insulator and further slows things down. I ...


3

It's certainly safe in terms of food contact. See How does a Miracle Thaw work? - it's really just a sheet of metal. It's not very much different from just putting your food on a baking sheet. Just be sure to clean it between uses as you would with anything else that touched raw meat. However, you do still have to be careful about general food safety: it's ...


3

The second one. If you tried it, you'd see ... it becomes ice water


2

If the pieces are only frozen together in a few places, you might want to try heating a butter knife up under hot water and then using that to pry them apart. This is similar to heating up an ice cream scoop. It won't work if they are really packed in together tightly though.


2

As @Jolenealaska said it's a defrosting tray like a miracle thaw or the like. There's nothing magic about it, it's simply a piece of metal that has high thermal conductivity. Materials that have a high thermal conductivity transfer heat more efficiently than those with a low conductivity. Aluminum is cheap and has a high thermal conductivity relative to ...


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