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22

Most beans can be soaked and cooked together with two exceptions. The beans should obviously have similar cooking times. For example I wouldn't cook chickpeas with other, harder beans because the chickpeas would be mush. Most varieties do have similar cooking times so this isn't often a problem. Second, black beans shouldn't be soaked with any other beans ...


9

Salt should be put before putting the spaghetti (or any other type of pasta for that matters) in the water. For 200g spaghetti (2 people) count ~2-3 liters of water and 20-30g rock salt. You can reduce the amount of salt if the sauce you are using is already quite salty. As a note to your point 2, the salt INCREASES the boiling point of water (a process ...


7

Salt doesn't lower the boiling point of water, it elevates it. Even so, the amount of salt you add to pasta water (10g/litre is a good guide) will barely make a difference. You need to add nearly 6 times that amount of salt to a litre of water to raise its boiling point by 0.5°C. As throwing things into boiling water can result in splashing, I suggest ...


6

Just like many other ingredients, when spices are added to a dish is a function of what effect you want them to have on the final dish. If you want deep, well-integrated flavors, or even undertones, you add them early so the flavors meld into the product. If you want a more pronounced flavor or an aroma, they are added at or near the end of cooking. In ...


6

Like you would describe colour or music, you add dark at the beginning & bright at the end. Any type of deep curry or chilli flavour will improve over several hours in the pot, & even overnight, left to go cold then re-heated the next day. The problem with that can be that you lose some of the 'brightness' off the top; some of the zing is missing. ...


6

It's not really chemistry¹, but simple physics: you can have the same result with salt. (and an experiment you can easily replicate at home: salt is much cheaper than sugar). What happens is that the salt and the sugar and a whole lot of other things indeed absorb the water in the egg, which makes the proteins in the egg unfold, hook into one another and ...


4

I'd like to mention possible 'gotchas' if you're going to do this -- You want to use similar-sized beans. If you're mixing small & large beans, then they're likely not going to cook at the same time. Avoid old beans. They take longer to soften, and you don't want to find that one bean refuses to soften while the other has turned to mush. If you're ...


4

You should add the seasoning at the end of cooking the rice. Actually normally I let my rice cool down for 10-15 minutes and transfer it to a large mixing bowl before mixing the seasoning with my rice. I do not think it matters when you add the salt BUT the wet ingredients (including sugar) should be added after the water has been absorbed by the rice.


4

The old wives are spectacularly wrong in this case - sugar not only doesn't cook eggs, it makes it harder to cook them. For example, see this passage from Shirley Corriher's "Cookwise" (emphasis mine): One day Roland Mesnier, the White House pastry chef, asked me to prepare his lemon curd recipe b heating it on high, bringing it to a boil, and ...


3

Food safety wise, as long as you keep the food above 50C it should be fine. However, due to the nature of the BW, you’ll probably end up having a very soggy pastry if you do so. Refrigeration is an option: Depending on if you will you pre-cook or just sear the loin: If you pre-cook, you’d normally want the pastry to crisp as quick as possible, and then ...


3

The first time you do this, you'll need to keep an eye on it. Baking times vary by a wide variety of factors, so there's no magic number that we can give you. I generally don't recommend baking by time, rather knowing what to look for in a "done" cake, be that a solid center, springy tops, browning, or pan release... depending on the cake. When I make mini ...


3

According to Serious Eats, a 210 gram steak in sitting in a 21° C room managed to go from 3° C to 10° C... in 2 hours. For a larger steak going up all the way to 21 degrees, it would take longer. The take-away from that article is that it's not worth it and does not affect the resulting steak.


3

You do need to soak the beans unfortunately, you are not going to get good results without soaking them. There's really no substitute for adzuki beans which would work well in this recipe, I'd go for another type of filling. Choux pastry (ie the puff) can be baked ahead of time but is best fresh as it gets soggy easily.You could make the pastry cream the ...


3

You should consult the owner's manual for your slow cooker. According to one manual on West Bend's website: There are five numbered heat settings on the heating base, 1 to 5. Heat setting # 1 should only be used to warm dinner rolls, muffins, etc. Heat setting # 2 should only be used to keep warm cooked foods for serving, whereas Heat Settings #3, #...


2

It certainly does make sense - adding herbs at the beginning of the process (not just parsley) gives them ample time to infuse their flavor into the stock. I regularly do so along with other herbs: rosemary, thyme, or whatever else is on hand. This is an optimal place to use up dried herbs (I'm fairly sure a lot of kitchens have a sad, half-used container ...


2

I usually let a steak sit out for 45 minutes to an hour before cooking it. But the real answer is to get a meat thermometer, preferably an instant-read digital one, and use that to not only tell you when your steak is at room temp, but also to tell you when it's done cooking.


2

It really depends on the specific spice/herb, and on how strong you want it to be in the dish. Some aromatics are destroyed by prolonged heating, while others can't be tasted unless left to steep in the dish as it cooks. Cumin, mustard seed, coriander seed and others are at their most powerful when mixed into oil/fat at high temperature, usually in the ...


2

It's normal to rest meat before carving, sometimes for quite a long time. The oven will already be hot after cooking the meat, even if not quite as hot as you'd use for potatoes. so I suggest you parboil the potatoes (often recommended anyway) and put the roasting tin and fat into the oven to preheat when the pork is nearly done. Then take the pork out of ...


1

170C isn't far off a good temperature for crispy roast potatoes. If they're a floury variety, and you parboil them, then when as dry as possible, and still warm, gently shake them to rough them up a bit in a bowl with the hot fat you're going to roast them with, they should take about 40 minutes at about 180 (turning once or twice,) to be golden and crunchy ...


1

There is a way of speeding up the soaking just a little, and that is the addition of bicarbonate of soda and potassium bicarbonate (baking soda & baking powder)... This will somewhat reduce the soaking time. However remember to clean your beans well after soaking.


1

A typical French Bouquet Garni would indeed have parsley in it, added at the beginning of simmering time. It may be a sprig of thyme, a bay-leaf, and a small bunch of parsley tied up in a neat little package, rolled in a leaf of leek. When I'm making stock at home, I'm less sophisticated, and more frugal. I save everything I plan to use in a stock in a ...


1

Absolutely add parsley in the beginning. I believe the French call it a bouquet when they tie many spices and herbs together or put them in a bag (bouquet garnet) and put them in the soup and in the end take it out. Myself I chop the parsley up once I make the stock from the chicken and add it when I add just a few veges (that's how my late Mama taught me) ...


1

I always mix beans for soups and chillies, only one type is too boring for me, never an issue. Actually, you can find bags of "15-bean soup" kits in the bean section of grocery store - they also needs to be presoaked and manufacturers dont expect you to sort everything out and soak/cook each type of bean separately :-)


1

I have a huge jar of mixed beans left over from other bags just a Hodge podge.. and I cook them all together I presoak them fast soak when I forgot.. it's got everything I can think of in there (were bean eaters lol). From chickpeas, limas, pinto, black, red and green lentils, black eyes peas, white beans red beans.. I just throw in a whole peeled onion (it ...


1

Any kind of beans can be cooked together. It's all about preference and your imagination. Try white beans, kidney, lima and pinto beans. They cook well together and make an awesome baked bean dish.


1

I'm going to argue for adding the salt after a boil, but before adding the pasta ... because I have stainless steel pots. If you add salt to cold water, it won't disolve and disperse quickly. This results in the salt falling to the bottom of the pot, then slowly disolving there but not mixing. This increased concentration of salt can end up causing ...


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