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9

When heated, sugar will caramelize and turn into caramel. No other ingredients are required. According to Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking published by Scribner, 2004, p. 688: Caramel is first of all the brown, sweet, aromatic syrup produced in caramelization, which may be used as a coloring and/or flavoring ingredient in many preparations. But cooks ...


5

In short, Butter. Toffee has Butter, caramel does not. Of course there are lots of variations, and there are some candies called 'Caramels', which may in fact be hard toffees. The softness or hardness of a toffee depends on the amount of fat added, and the temperature to which the sugar is raised. Strictly speaking, though, caramel is either 'dry' (pure ...


5

Your recipe is broken. If it actually gave you that temperature then discard it and find a new one. Nougat is made, depending on the recipe, by heating the syrup to "hard ball" or "soft crack" temperatures before beating it into the egg whites. Candy temperatures are categorized by the behavior of the syrup when dripped into ice water. Hard ball is around ...


5

In the past I have had a similar issue with making a butterscotch drink recipe. What I have found is that adding a bit of water to the melted butter (1-2 tsp/1/2 c, 5-10mL/120mL) helps dissolve the brown sugar and prevents graininess and seizing. Sugar is not readily soluble in fat, so it needs water in order to dissolve. I suspect one of three things ...


4

"Caramel" is a substance which is created by heating sugar. It is hard at room temperature, aromatic, and has many uses as an ingredient. It can be used "pure", for example poured into very thin slices, which are used for cake decoration. More frequently, it is dissolved in liquids to make a sauce or creme. "Toffee" is a kind of confection. It is made by ...


4

I recently had a similar problem, and I would guess that your solution will be similar as well. As in my case your recipe fails to be specific regarding too what temperature to elevate your mixture. To solve this you will need a candy thermometer. (In the US these are available at most stores that carry kitchen implements (Wal-xxx, Tarxx, etc.) The peek ...


4

Toffee is a confection made by caramelizing sugar or molasses (creating inverted sugar) along with butter, and occasionally flour. The mixture is heated until its temperature reaches the hard crack stage of 149 to 154 °C (300 to 310 °F). While being prepared, toffee is sometimes mixed with nuts or raisins. As stated here - https://www.google.co.uk/...


3

caramel (n.) 1725, "burnt sugar," from French caramel "burnt sugar" (17c.), from Old Spanish caramel (modern caramelo)caramel origin This suggests that what is commonly called Caramel is the burning (or almost burnt) sugar, either on it's own or in sweetened condensed milk or other milk products with added sugar.


3

The bane of sugar syrup or caramel making is unwanted crystalization. A few stray sugar crystals, a premature stir, and your caramel gets grainy instead of smooth. Corn syrup is an invert sugar (glucose), which can prevent this. Alternatively, a bit of acid (a few drops of lemon juice, a pinch cream of tartar...) will break some of the sucrose (plain sugar) ...


3

It's just a HARD bar of toffee. It often looks like a chocolate bar, as it is marked into break-off segments Modern "English Toffee" recipes call for toffee with a chocolate coating dusted with chopped nuts. I don't think this is really traditional English toffee Use regular butter and sugar toffee as a substitute


3

Leaving any sort of sugar confection in the fridge (as it will out of the fridge also, but to a lesser extent) will soften the sugar after a prolonged period due to the moisture in the air. However, putting it in the fridge for a short period of time will simply speed up the cooling process as you put in your question.


2

Toffee cannot continue to cook once it's been poured onto a baking sheet. There is no heat source at this point and therefore there can be no increase in temperature. All other factors being equal, I might suggest looking at your ingredients. Are you using beet sugar this year when you usually use cane sugar? It might seem like a trivial difference, ...


2

I just made three trays of these and they turned out grainy and not set-up. I followed the recipe I was using and boiled for 3 minutes at a rolling boil before pouring on crackers and baking. Since I was going to toss them anyway, I put them back in the oven (with chocolate, nuts and sprinkles on them). I used an oven thermometer and waited until the ...


2

Brown sugar can be used to good effect in candy making. With the texture issue, something is crystallizing the sugar. Try using your ingredients with the more classic method.


2

If the origin of the recipe is American, by "English Toffee" they probably actually mean Heath Bars. Heath Bars are, of course, chocolate-covered, but it's occasionally possible to find "bare" Heath toffee in the baking aisle of various supermarkets. If the recipe is British or French in origin, it could refer to chewy English toffee (per Red Spatula), ...


2

English toffee is very chewy - the kind of stuff that glues your teeth together! Once it has been cooked and set, it's not easy to handle and wouldn't be easy to chop up for a cookie recipe. You'd possibly be better off with some kind of fudge which is easier to handle but will still hold its shape in a cookie.


2

It's normal for some layering in home made foamed sugar (hokey pokey, honeycomb etc.) The problem is that you can't stir it quick enough to get an even distribution of acid to alkaline (the bubble making process) throughout the mixture before it cools to the point you can't stir it Factories use fancy heated augur style stirrers to avoid this, and they don'...


2

I have had similar issue with a brown sugar / butter candy that I've been making since I was a kid. I'm coming to the conclusion that there is a difference in brands of brown sugar and the one I've used for years works and the one that is most commonly available where I now live makes up grainy. Maybe I'll try adding some water to see if that eliminates ...


1

Basically the hotter you get the sugar, the harder it sets. One thing you should take note of is the color, the darker the color, the hotter you got it. Go slowly when melting the sugar, get it to the temperature you want, and then add the rest of the ingredients in. Melting the sugar slower, makes sure that the edges don't get overcooked and burnt. The ...


1

My go-to brownie recipe is very similar to your butterscotch bars, just melt butter + sugar in the microwave until just melted. The texture will be a little grainy (or if you want to use the stovetop, use a double boiler or baine Marie). Wait till warm and when you add the egg, the mixture will become smooth. By the time when the flour is added everything ...


1

Try using an emusifier, like Lecithin; a quantity of 0.1-0.2% of your batch size. You can buy it at health stores.


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