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14

Here's my tricks and tips based on 25 years of being a vegetarian and cooking for a spouse who is not: Avoid meat substitutes entirely for most meals. They just don't satisfy, and simply act to remind you of the meat you're missing. Learn to cook & like cuisines that do not require meat, or only require it in small quantities, including Middle ...


13

It's semantic nitpicking. Tofu is defined as soy milk, curdled and pressed. Some people who don't care about oriental culinary tradition think of tofu as any non-dairy milk that is curdled and pressed into a curd. Technically your almond tofu would be almond milk curd or some such. In reality your coworker is being pedantic and I would accept the term "...


12

The okara has some unextracted protein and sugar but it also has a large quantity of fiber. That fiber will prevent the protein from properly coagulating. If you leave in all the okara you get soybean porridge. I imagine you could leave in a portion of the okara and you would get a fragile but hearty tofu. The problem with this is that, with most tofu ...


10

Most likely, they are using a softer tofu than you. For whatever reason, the US is infatuated with unusually firm tofu, and supermarkets emphasize the "extra firm" varieties. In Asia, especially Japan and Korea, but even in China, most applications call for a softer, more custard-like tofu. If it's soft inside, when you deep fry the tofu, it should stay ...


10

A number of Chinese restaurants are happy to prepare it without pork or beef. I've seen it with pork (most common) or beef (sometimes). A vegetarian Chinese place that I occasionally visit uses a "vegetarian ham" along with some vegetables like peas to augment the custardy texture of the soft tofu. I like to add some ja tsai (zasai, depending on ...


10

Making tofu for mass production and consumption and making tofu at home generally follow the same procedures. Soybeans are soaked, ground, and cooked. The resulting "milk" is separated from the soilds. Then a coagulant is added (either salts, acids, or enzymes depending on producer and type of tofu). Finally, the tofu is pressed. The one difference ...


7

Non-textured, or 'Silken' tofu (which comes in extra soft, soft, firm and extra firm varieties, just to be confusing), is typically used in sauces that would otherwise call for cream (I have used it in vegan mornay- and bechamel- style sauces), or in making cheeses (i.e. ricotta), and things requiring softer cheese (i.e. cheesecake) as a component. It is ...


7

Food.com actually provides a recipe for making it, saying: Yushi doufu is tofu that has not been pressed and formed, but simply scooped out after tofu coagulates... The ingredients are soy beans, water, and nigari.


7

I'm going to assume you're not considering deep frying, which would generally be the easiest way to fry evenly on all sides (at once). If you want something similar to pan frying, probably the simplest solution to get evenly browned cubes, assuming you have sufficient time, is to roast the food in the oven instead with a little oil or fat (which some people ...


6

I am Chinese from Hong Kong and there is a dessert called "almond tofu" IN CHINESE. The "almond" part refers to the almond extract, one of the ingredients. The "tofu" part refers to the texture of the final product, similar to silken tofu. It is really a jelly made from milk and jellying agent. The jellying agent can be unflavored gelatin or agar agar. ...


6

I have an old SoyaQuick (mine has a filter, newer models don't), and I think it was largely a cleaning concern. The tiny perforations in the filter clogged very easily, and the instruction manual had a whole section of bizarre tips for cleaning it (soak it in bleach! squeeze a soapy sponge to one side to force the suds through!) There's also some marketing ...


6

One possible reason is that Tempeh is uniquely from Indonesia, which is much less of a culinary influence on the US than China, Japan, and Korea - all of which use tofu in traditional dishes. There were an estimated 95,000 Indonesian immigrants in 2010, where Eastern Asian immigrants was over 3.9 million in 2014. sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


5

Pretty much anything that removes a substantial amount of water from tofu will help it soak up marinades and sauces. Both are essentially flavorful water, and if the tofu is already full of water, the flavor has to very, very slowly diffuse into the tofu, while if the tofu has been dried out somewhat, the sauce or marinade can simply soak directly in. Dry ...


5

Yes, silken tofu is undrained tofu. In Japan it is often eaten raw, in dishes like miso soup or even simply dipped in soy sauce. However, you can certainly cook it as well - it is especially useful as an egg substitute in vegan cookery (any number of recipes online). Firm tofu is probably better for frying with as it holds its shape. If you have the time, ...


5

Standard tips for browning/frying/grilling tofu; Ensure that you press the tofu sufficiently to remove its own moisture, marinate if desired Lightly dust with flour Brush oil on the grilling surface The same advice applies for pan frying. I prefer to work at a high temperature, others have had very good results using only medium. Use a very thin, flat ...


5

1- Is this a valid approach and I should just add a lot more of my flavoring agents? Yes, you can make additions to your curd prior to pressing/knitting just like with cheese. Adding bits of dried peppers ala pepper jack cheese sounds like a great idea. The main concern in this regard is to avoid adding so much adjuncts that the tofu curd fails to knit ...


5

Do you ever deep fry it, or are you always doing a pan-fry/shallow fry? Most of the tofu I see at Thai restaurants is deep fried, which yields the texture I think you are talking about. You may or may not be willing to deep fry at home, but I think if you do you'll get the result you are looking for.


5

If you include the actual beans in the curds, it'll be edible, but it won't really be tofu. (Edited to add: There are a couple of Japanese companies that produce a product called "Tofu with okara", but based on my reading of this article plus the help of awkward machine translation, it appears to be using okara treated with an enzyme in order to reduce the ...


5

Tossing relatively frequently (maybe every minute or so) should in fact help and would seem the simplest, most traditional technique (here another video, with potatoes). If you leave the cubes for a long time on one side and only toss after the first side is completely done, any cube you fail to turn will burn. But cubes remaining unturned are not a problem ...


5

They were literally thrown away, physically removed from the whole. The basic steps of making tofu are: Make soy milk out of the soy beans. The residue after straining the milk, called okara, is not used in the tofu. It contains lots of carbohydrates, especially insoluble fibre. Curdle the soy milk with epsom salt. Separate the curds from the whey and ...


5

The key in a stir-fry is that the ingedients can at all times move about freely. A spatula shouldn't really be needed, the way it is in sautéing, rather you use a spoon/ladle to just, well, stir the loose mixture. In fact even that isn't ideal: arguably, it should rather be called toss-fry, because vigorously moving the pan is the best way to keep everything ...


5

Traditionally, it's first dropped into boiling water & allowed to sit as the water cools for 15 minutes before drying off & deep frying. There's a 'cheat' method, though. Press to dry, sprinkle with a little cornflour & shallow fry, on its own. Add to the dish when cooked. Dress with anything you fancy - chilli, soy sauce, sesame oil, rice wine ...


5

Meat substitutes - a word of warning for someone attempting to replace meat in one fell swoop... I'll leave everyone else to come up with viable meat alternatives, if that's what you actually require, but as someone who once did this & failed miserably, a word of warning. Don't expect meat substitutes to give you the same flavour or texture ...


5

This is a non-vegetarian POV: Eating healthier is often just as "easy" as eating less. A good meat substitute would be to replace your meat with: Nothing. Now I don't mean replace all your meat in a dish, just part of it. Just halve the amount of meat you eat and you're already eating healthier. Halve the amount of potatoes you eat too. Keep veggies at ...


4

You're right in that most of the tofu that we see in supermarkets are the white, super-bland type...the only variation is in softness. If you're a vegetarian, you probably know where to find other kinds that have been baked, marinated, etc. I really love tofu and one of my favorite kind is a densely packed tofu called "dofu-gan", literally translated as "...


4

Kenji Lopez-Alt at SeriousEats.com has a very nice article about coming up with this recipe for a vegan Mapo Tofu that he (otherwise a happy meat eater) claims is even better than the pork one. The main replacement for the pork is mushrooms (he recommends a mix of wood ear, morel, and porcini), because of the good match in flavour. To get the texture he ...


4

The measure of firmness has to do with how much water is pressed out during processing. If you are making regular (non-silken) tofu, you will simply press the tofu longer to squeeze more water out of it. If you're also making the soymilk, I suppose you could make the milk thicker too to cut some of the pressing time.


4

In addition to the advice above about not explicitly trying to replace meat, the best advice I can give is to think about two things when cooking vegetarian: Umami. This is the Number One problem most people have (I'm talking to you, work cafeteria) when cooking vegetarian. Meat gives the umami/savory flavor in a dish, and you can't simply replace it with a ...


4

Just wanted to state in addendum to all the comments and answers already given, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, and calcium sulfate are all classified as GRAS per the FDA.


3

Marinated tofu is essentially a myth perpetrated by well-meaning people who are, in my experience, culturally pretty far removed from cuisines where tofu is heavily used. Tofu is not especially porous, because it's texturally very similar to a custard. Maybe osmotic pressure will result in a little flavor transfer to a custard, but it's not the most ...


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