8

What do you mean by "traditional/proper"? A lot of Indian food is named simply after the ingredients in it - cucumber salad would probably just be cucumber salad. Sometimes they are named after the type of cooking method or vessel they are made in. Your Karhai broccoli is an example of that; the karhai (or karahi) is a type of pot used in Indian cooking. ...


7

You don't mention covering your pot, so I'm assuming you left it uncovered for the duration. If that's the case, you boiled all your liquid off. Next time you can try using a lid, that should slow the evaporation of water from your pot and leave you with some stock still in the pot. Even if the pot was covered, though, "a couple of hours" is a pretty long ...


7

Usually the first infusion is to remove pesticides and some dust that accumulates while aging the tea. Another reason is to let the dry leaves "breathe" to bring out their taste in subsequent infusions. You're supposed to drain out the water in seconds; so it shouldn't take away the taste.


7

It really comes down to taste. In this usage, you're treating sauerkraut like a condiment so there's not really a "correct" answer.. A lot of hot dog places have traditions - for instance, Nathan's Famous hot dogs (the original "Coney Island" hot dog) uses these combinations with kraut: -Sauerkraut, spicey brown mustard (New York style) -Thousand island ...


6

It's a tradition in Scotland as well. A boiled suet fruit cake Clootie Dumpling is when eaten at Christmas especially has small coins and charms included in the mixture. The mixture is put in a clean muslin cloth and boiled. Although traditionally eaten at Christmas the pudding is also eaten at other times but the coins/charms are only used at Christmas. ...


5

Yes, this is definitely a Greek tradition, a New Year's bread called vasilopita Vasilopita (Greek: Βασιλόπιτα, Vasilópita, lit. '(St.) Basil-pie' or 'king pie', see below) is a New Year's Day bread or cake in Greece and many other areas in eastern Europe and the Balkans which contains a hidden coin or trinket which gives good luck to the receiver, like ...


5

Naan traditionally is plain flat bread made using bread flour, Yeast, salt and water. Its cooked in tandoor. Salt could be optional if you are having naan with a curry. (Cause curry usually has salt and the bread might not need it). Variations like milk or yogurt is used instead of water to make dough soft and fluffy. This would change the texture and ...


5

Naan is a catch-all term for flat, leavened bread throughout the asian subcontinent. There are many, many variations which have developed depending on what ingredients were typically to hand in the different regions. So there are many equally traditional and authentic variations. In other words the answer is that there is no answer, try a few and find out ...


4

Yes, this is something you almost always want to do with fine Chinese (or Japanese) tea. It is not necessary, or useful, with inexpensive tea. The purpose of the first rinse is to rinse away some of the bitter compounds which will be present on the outside of the tea leaves, so that more of the full flavor of the tea can shine through when you actually ...


4

When I was in China (July 2012), we visited a tea merchant. Our guide said that if we bought any tea we should throw out the first brew to get rid of the pesticides. Since I couldn't see how the government would benefit by giving out that info (and I think most professional guides are affiliated with the government), she seemed pretty credible. I've been ...


3

About the recipe: Naan is traditionally made with yogurt to leaven it. It would have to sit for at least 4 hrs, or up to 12, depending on how warm it is. Yeast was not traditionally used in india (though is now), and baking soda is also a newer introduction. Milk or water can be used interchangeably. Milk will make it a bit softer. This is just preference....


3

There is a similar tradition in Bulgaria. On the Christmas Eve is served Christmas bread with a coin inside it. Then everyone takes a piece of the bread. The one who finds the coin inside his piece will be very lucky and happy during the next year. The Christmas bread can be in different shape with variety of ornaments and symbols. According to the old ...


2

If you are looking at how recipes published these days (especially online), from indian authors, are titled, you will notice a pattern. The "traditional" hindi or telugu name is only part of the recipe title. At the very least, three qualifiers are common: a regional qualifier. This can refer to indian states or large regions (eg "Panjabi Aloo Gobi"), and/...


2

A recent Chinese study shows that rinsing tea can reduce pesticides but can't remove them completely: The results showed that the 8 pesticides transferred into the rinse water at rates between 0.2% and 24% after 5, 10, 20, or 30 seconds. Rinsing tea before brewing reduced the pesticide risk levels by 5 to 59% in the tea infusion. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih....


2

You have to rinse pu-erh tea at least once. http://www.teavivre.com/info/brew-an-enjoyable-pu-erh-tea/


2

As far as rinsing of tea leaves goes, it does help remove the pesticides to a great extent. Teas made by fermenting, like the Darjeeling tea and Chinese teas are often rinsed to 'wake' the leaves. A quick rinsing is required preferably less ten seconds. Caffeine is removed to some extent because of rinsing but to remove the optimal level of caffeine one has ...


2

I'm positive the artificial casing changes the flavor because it tastes differently from natural casing. Besides, the stomach is bigger than most artificial casings. So, it affects the flavor (not something I would worry about too much) and the size and therefore the cooking time.


2

Not absorbed (what would absorb it?)....evaporated. Even covered there was probably room for water vapor to escape. If you've stored them properly since...or this just happened. Cover with water, and simmer for 45 minutes. Strain. Use the stock. It won't be ideal, but you can avoid wasting the original ingredients.


1

Since your confusion seems to come from not knowing where the sweet spot lies between too much and too little water: I looked up in Ruhlman's book "Ratio", and he recommends 3 parts water to 2 parts bones. On top of that, add mirepoix such that it makes no more than 20% of the total ingredients, which comes to a total ratio of roughly 3:2:1. With that ...


1

Millet in general is perfectly cookable as a whole grain. It functions pretty interchangeably with other grains and pseudograins, except where you need very specific qualities (e.g. you probably won't be able to make sushi out of it because you can't get the right amount of stickiness). I don't know about Ragi specifically, as opposed to the generic food ...


1

A good start is probably wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_knife. There you will see the main types of knives and their name. If you recognize one, I'd suggest you to google it. I haven't found a comprehensive guide for all of them.


1

All beef hot dogs with sauerkraut and brown mustard, can't get much better than that unless you add bacon and/or avocado. The traditional NY hot dog is all beef hot dog with sauerkraut and mustard, you can also add a sweet diced pickle relish and/or a tomato&onion sauce too.


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