8

Botulism is spot on - not only can botulism spores survive in honey (hence the "no honey for babies under 1 year" rule), the truffles have grown in soil, which is a typical source of Clostridium botulinum spores. There are well- known reports of botulism caused by garlic in oil and truffles in oil (albeit rarer due to the way smaller total amount of ...


4

You can store fresh truffles in a kitchen towel and close it in a glass jar. Here (http://www.truffle-shop.com/storing-truffles) I even read that you can store the truffle with rice or eggs. The perfume will penetrate the egg shell and later you can eat truffle scrambled eggs without putting truffles on :-)


3

The process is apparently very simple: grate fresh truffle into salt using a microplane, and pulse with a food processor to blend. One source said the flavor intensified over time. I can't find a ratio either, but it looks like about 10:1 salt:truffle, maybe less. Flavor is always going to vary a bit with something natural such as truffles, but if your ...


3

Uncooked? I was shocked at how unimpressive the flavor of raw shaved truffle was. It was kind of earthy, not particularly strong in flavor; in this case the truffle was probably not fresh enough. When heated and allowed to release their full flavor and aroma into food though, they are phenomenal. There's a rich, luscious taste and smell, with an almost ...


3

Basically, it is that easy. But it is a costly endeaver. I have know chefs to make it with a pure olive oil or grape seed oil. Some heat it to 220 degrees or so but I have meet some that don't. The ones that didn't made sure to pull the oxygen from the bottle with one of those wine vacuum savers. I have been told self made truffle oil will lose it ...


3

13 grams to serve pasta for two is generous, but not extremely so. I think you're smart to keep the dish simple, you don't want to complicate things with extraneous flavors to muddle the taste of a star ingredient so special. Despite the very topical and interesting link provided by SAJ14SAJ, I'd be wary of sauteing the truffle in anything truffle flavored, ...


2

Truffles are a low acid food, and they grow underground, so they are at risk to have botulism spores present. Vacuum packing creates a low oxygen environment, which is what the botulism bacteria requires to grow and produce its toxin. Unless the truffles have been salted (to 5% by weight), acidified (to a pH of 4.6 or lower), or frozen (at all times ...


2

Your best bet is something that is airtight. If you're within reach of a vacuum packager, I think that putting a folded paper towel in the base of the bag and placing the truffles on top and sealing under a snug vacuum will keep them freshest the longest. Like any other fungus you don't want to expose them to much moisture. Don't wash them until your ready ...


2

From Google: While you probably won't die from eating fungus, keep in mind that foods that are moldy may also have invisible bacteria growing along with the mold. The colorful mold you see on the surface of food is just the tip of what is going on inside. Most molds are harmless, but some are dangerous. Some contain mycotoxins. My suggestion is that ...


2

I would expect a difference in taste between an N. American white truffle and a European one simply because they are not of the same species. Italian white truffle are "Tuber magnatum" and N. Amercian are either "Tuber oregonense" or "Tuber gibbosum" depending on region and time of harvest.


1

Maybe use slightly less filling? You're forming the ganache balls freehand, you mentioned, so it might be possible to form a little pocket or gap somewhere in the filling as you roll it (maybe with a toothpick), so that when the chocolate shrinks there's space for the extra filling to go instead of bursting the shell. I think it would work better if there ...


1

If you want "the most (real) truffle aroma", as you write, there is no question that it will come from real truffles. With a bit of Internet searching you can see that truffle oil is generally a chemically derived product. While we can debate whether or not any flavor or aroma that is created in the "lab" is the same as the real thing, you specifically ...


1

Dave Arnold developed an effective way to infuse oil with aromatics that are heat sensitive. To employ it, you need an ISI or other brand whipper. Here is an example: https://www.starchefs.com/product_education/iSi/whipper/html/recipe-lemon-infused-extra-virgin-olive-oil-dave-arnold.shtml I've had great success with the technique and see no reason why you ...


1

Edit This answer assumes that you want a shelf-stable oil. If you are going to use up the oil immediately (or within 3 days and refrigerate), methods like the pressure charging from moscafj's answer don't pose a safety problem. Simply, you can't. I am not sure how industrial oils are made, maybe they are irradiated or simply made under sanitized conditions ...


1

This is true, most truffle oil is not flavored with truffle, it is rather flavored with dithiapentane(an odorant). You should be able to tell by the label if it is in fact flavored by the actual truffle or dithiapentane. Not sure I would say that a sliver of truffle in the bottle would be enough to know for sure. On a side not I recently had the ...


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