Hot answers tagged

25

Yes, you absolutely can eat turkey eggs. They are somewhat like duck eggs in that they are richer and creamier in taste. However, turkeys don't lay nearly as many eggs as chickens - perhaps 100 a year as opposed to a hen's 300, so don't expect to enjoy them too often.


15

Turkey eggs look and taste like chicken eggs, they are just bigger. The ones I have tried had a higher yolk to white ratio, and were much richer as a result. Perfectly safe to eat.


14

It is possible to over brine meat. If you leave it in too long it will get too salty. If you use a more dilute brine it won't get as salty but you will wash out more of the natural flavor into the water as well. You could submerge your turkey in its packaging in ice water in a cooler for a day before brining. You could even thaw the turkey in this manner ...


13

The other answers touch on the fact that its the release of water from the turkey that interacts with the oil, causes the oil to overflow, and then ignite the burner. Generally, this happens pretty shortly after you put the turkey in (due do any moisture on the outside of the bird). To do it safely don't bank on the fact that you've removed all the water - ...


13

The purpose- as with any cooked meat- is to let the meat firm up so it doesn't release juices when you cut into it. In the case of a turkey it also helps to let it cool enough to not burn you when you are carving and eating it. Both of these goals will be met in 30 minutes to an hour. I don't know why that chef would recommend 3 hours. At that length of ...


13

Yes, and here's a rare example of some on sale in a supermarket, in the "eggs" section. These images are taken from the Buzzfeed article "19 Times Waitrose Went Way, Way Too Far", which gently makes fun of a UK supermarket chain that has a reputation for being rather posh. Individual Twitter users are credited in that article. For a size comparison, you ...


12

As @Eric Hu notes, a dark roux is the way to go. It's interesting that he mentions Alton Brown, as it's his turkey gravy recipe I use. His recipe also uses red wine, which further darkens the gravy, richens it, and adds a fantastic flavor. I'd only change one thing: next time I'm going to make the roux and finish the gravy in a separate pan after deglazing. ...


12

Water freezes at 32F, but turkey contains more than just water. Alton Brown answers this question in his original turkey episode of Good eats. The meat freezes at 26F, so they can call it "fresh" if it's kept at say, 30F (below the freezing temp for water). The USDA recognizes "frozen" for a turkey as having been brought down to 0F. Apparently the middle ...


11

My best guess is that your stock is very weak. Two gallons of water to just the bones from one turkey will not be a strong stock. It may well well have gelatin in it, but very thin. I make stock for a single turkey with the wing tips (not the 'drumstick' part), the back, the neck--everything but the breast and leg/thighs in with about 1 gallon of water to ...


9

I'll try to weigh on in this as much as possible with a non-authoritative answer: First of all, I simply can't state this emphatically enough: kashering is not brining! A kosher bird is not "pre-brined", and professional chefs who claim that it is are either misinforming their audiences or simply misinformed themselves. Kashering (sometimes called ...


9

If you are saying you cannot get the oil hot enough during pre-heating: You may need a bigger burner than the one you are using. Most resources I've seen suggest over 100k BTU There may be something physically wrong with your setup (i.e., the vessel should be closer to the flame) The ambient temperature at the time of cooking was simply too cold for the ...


9

There's so much heat around a turkey deep-fryer I wouldn't see how light or medium snow would affect your cooking. Any snow is going to melt and probably evaporate before it comes into contact with any hot oil, and any that makes contact will be gone in a flash. I've barbequed in 20 below and in snow, all that it really means is that you need more heat. My ...


9

This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


9

Reusing deep frying oil is fine (up to a point - you can't refry indefinitely), and in fact the flavour often improves with use. You should be absolutely fine frying two turkeys one after the other for Thanksgiving. Have a good one!


9

Before you use the drippings, taste them. If they taste good on their own, they will be great for gravy. Often, the oil left in the pan after roasting turkey is used to make the roux to thicken gravy to go with that turkey. If it looks like all oil, you can use it as such. Especially since the turkey was pre-basted, the drippings might be a mixture of oil ...


8

If you're following a particular recipe to the letter, and it specifies tying the legs together, then you might want to consider it. Otherwise, I wouldn't bother. Trussing a bird will pull it together into a more compact shape, the reasoning for cooking being that it will cook more evenly if it's closer to a uniform spheroid shape, rather than having leg ...


8

If you heat some up, and add a little salt, does it taste good? Then its a successful stock. If you want it to be thicker/stronger, simmer it a while to reduce it. As SAJ14SAJ says, that's a fairly large amount of water vs. the amount of bones.


8

Some ideas: Use a brown chicken/turkey stock. Classic poultry stock uses raw bones, but you can make a rich, brown stock using roasted bones. Be aware that it won't be as gelatinous as it would be with raw bones, so if you can, add some necks, backs, and if you can find them, feet. Add some tawny port, Madeira, or dry Marsala. In terms of technique: make ...


8

Ok, I‘ll bite. While according to Today.com Butterball posted a recipe, my contradicting answer is You don’t. At least not when you want a whole bird with crisp skin. Like this: (Source) The inner volume of your microwave is most likely not big enough - for the experiment, I checked my freestanding 25l model: inner space is 215.0 x 337.0 x 354.0 mm, ...


7

I heard GR say 3 hours this year too, so you're not misremembering. I recently started letting it rest for 45 minutes to an hour, and it's worked out great. My reason for choosing that amount of time is: that's how long veggies need to roast in the oven. Once upon a time I used to rest it for 30 min, meaning I needed to at least start roasting the veg while ...


7

I am firmly in the "stuffing is evil" camp... but lets take that as read :-) If you absolutely must have in the bird stuffing, here is a link to a (I hope legal) excerpt of Alton Brown's Good Eats, showing his technique for doing turkey with stuffing: http://www.aol.com/video/alton-browns-turkey-with-stuffing/444711017/ He uses a food-safe cotton bag, ...


7

Brining is a better solution as it gives you juicy meat and extra flavour. Steaming would result in rather a bland taste. Brining is essentially marinading the meat in a saltwater solution (usually with some extra flavourings like peppercorns etc) overnight. You then roast the meat as normal. Super juicy, super tasty results. There are lots of guides online....


7

Steaming generally doesn't make meat juicier -- it is just as easy to dry out a piece of meat with wet heat as it is with dry heat, if not easier. There are two things that you can do to make your turkey juicier. The first is a brine, which Elendil suggests above. The second is to make sure you aren't overcooking. I'd suggest using a probe thermometer and ...


7

Unless you're feeding 20, chances are you want the smallest bird they have. It doesn't really matter if you should have 1 lb per person or 1.5 if you have 8 people and their smallest bird is 12 pounds - and I'm willing to bet that's the case. That said, I generally allow 1 lb per person and don't count the smallest children (say, haven't started school yet.)...


7

When it's in a bag, the steam produced during roasting is trapped. A layer of steam occurs between the skin and the meat, separating the skin from the meat. The same process happens when cooking without a bag, just more slowly, as the steam fills the entire oven - and then some of it escapes through vents or out the door seal. Turkeys release a ...


7

If possible I'd remove it from the oven and slice it up and put it in the fridge to cool it down as fast as possible to stop the cooking. When closer to serving, just reheat the meat. You can pour some of the juice on the carved slices to keep them as moist as possible. For christmas, this is what we will do (more "extreme) and cook the turkey one day in ...


6

You can either get fresh or dried yuba, the dried one has to be soaked. When I made a tofu turkey I soaked the yuba sheat for about 10 minutes in warm water before wrapping it around the "meat". The tofu turkey had already been baking in the oven for around 1 hour when I added the skin. After applying the yuba I rosted the whole thing in the oven until the ...


6

Add a roux, ideally a dark roux, to your gravy. This is a standard French and Cajun (which is French-rooted) technique for giving color and body to sauces. Roux's are essentially butter or oil and flour, heated gently and stirred occasionally to cook the flour so that it darkens in color, but doesn't burn. The darker the roux, the less thickening ...


6

According to Handbook of Food Science, Technology, and Engineering, Volume 3, edited by Yiu H. Hui, the freezing of any meats, (particularly red meats), causes cell walls to rupture the rate of rupture is inversely proportionate to the rate freezing Since household-grade freezers are of the slower sort, owing to an effort toward energy efficiency, when ...


6

This looks like an excellent answer to almost exactly the same question, found here. Tuxman Nov. 26, 2013 11:01 am I am trying to get a clear answer on cooking 2-15 lbs birds in different pans/same oven. what would the cooking time, same 20 min per lb on 325 degrees? for convection oven? dae Nov. 27, 2013 12:43 pm @Tuxman: Each bird cooks ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible