Hot answers tagged

25

Yes, you absolutely can eat turkey eggs. They are somewhat like duck eggs in that they are richer and creamier in taste. However, turkeys don't lay nearly as many eggs as chickens - perhaps 100 a year as opposed to a hen's 300, so don't expect to enjoy them too often.


15

Turkey eggs look and taste like chicken eggs, they are just bigger. The ones I have tried had a higher yolk to white ratio, and were much richer as a result. Perfectly safe to eat.


13

Yes, and here's a rare example of some on sale in a supermarket, in the "eggs" section. These images are taken from the Buzzfeed article "19 Times Waitrose Went Way, Way Too Far", which gently makes fun of a UK supermarket chain that has a reputation for being rather posh. Individual Twitter users are credited in that article. For a size comparison, you ...


12

Water freezes at 32F, but turkey contains more than just water. Alton Brown answers this question in his original turkey episode of Good eats. The meat freezes at 26F, so they can call it "fresh" if it's kept at say, 30F (below the freezing temp for water). The USDA recognizes "frozen" for a turkey as having been brought down to 0F. ...


10

Reusing deep frying oil is fine (up to a point - you can't refry indefinitely), and in fact the flavour often improves with use. You should be absolutely fine frying two turkeys one after the other for Thanksgiving. Have a good one!


9

There's so much heat around a turkey deep-fryer I wouldn't see how light or medium snow would affect your cooking. Any snow is going to melt and probably evaporate before it comes into contact with any hot oil, and any that makes contact will be gone in a flash. I've barbequed in 20 below and in snow, all that it really means is that you need more heat. My ...


9

This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


9

Before you use the drippings, taste them. If they taste good on their own, they will be great for gravy. Often, the oil left in the pan after roasting turkey is used to make the roux to thicken gravy to go with that turkey. If it looks like all oil, you can use it as such. Especially since the turkey was pre-basted, the drippings might be a mixture of oil ...


8

Ok, I‘ll bite. While according to Today.com Butterball posted a recipe, my contradicting answer is You don’t. At least not when you want a whole bird with crisp skin. Like this: (Source) The inner volume of your microwave is most likely not big enough - for the experiment, I checked my freestanding 25l model: inner space is 215.0 x 337.0 x 354.0 mm, ...


7

I heard GR say 3 hours this year too, so you're not misremembering. I recently started letting it rest for 45 minutes to an hour, and it's worked out great. My reason for choosing that amount of time is: that's how long veggies need to roast in the oven. Once upon a time I used to rest it for 30 min, meaning I needed to at least start roasting the veg while ...


7

Unless you're feeding 20, chances are you want the smallest bird they have. It doesn't really matter if you should have 1 lb per person or 1.5 if you have 8 people and their smallest bird is 12 pounds - and I'm willing to bet that's the case. That said, I generally allow 1 lb per person and don't count the smallest children (say, haven't started school yet.)...


7

The oven in a standard 20" kitchen stove will accommodate a bird even as large as 20 lbs (9 kg). The very detailed chart here, the pertinent details of which are replicated in the chart below, establish the standard dimensions of such an oven as 18 X 16 X 14.5 inches (46 x 41 x 37 cm). In their downloadable Thanksgiving pdf, for a turkey as large as 20 lbs ...


7

Essentially, it's like a giant chicken with a "deeper" and more distinctive flavor. The main reason I like them (other than the flavor) is the sheer quantity of meat you can get from one roasting session. One could roast multiple chickens for a similar effect, but with a turkey you only have one skeleton to pick meat off of, so it goes faster. Leftovers ...


7

When it's in a bag, the steam produced during roasting is trapped. A layer of steam occurs between the skin and the meat, separating the skin from the meat. The same process happens when cooking without a bag, just more slowly, as the steam fills the entire oven - and then some of it escapes through vents or out the door seal. Turkeys release a ...


7

If possible I'd remove it from the oven and slice it up and put it in the fridge to cool it down as fast as possible to stop the cooking. When closer to serving, just reheat the meat. You can pour some of the juice on the carved slices to keep them as moist as possible. For christmas, this is what we will do (more "extreme) and cook the turkey one day in ...


6

According to Handbook of Food Science, Technology, and Engineering, Volume 3, edited by Yiu H. Hui, the freezing of any meats, (particularly red meats), causes cell walls to rupture the rate of rupture is inversely proportionate to the rate freezing Since household-grade freezers are of the slower sort, owing to an effort toward energy efficiency, when ...


6

This looks like an excellent answer to almost exactly the same question, found here. Tuxman Nov. 26, 2013 11:01 am I am trying to get a clear answer on cooking 2-15 lbs birds in different pans/same oven. what would the cooking time, same 20 min per lb on 325 degrees? for convection oven? dae Nov. 27, 2013 12:43 pm @Tuxman: Each bird cooks ...


6

I've never thought of turkey as gamey at all, but that's just my own taste I guess. It sounds to me you want a milder bird, in which case you want to buy a cheap battery bird. Gameyness comes from exercise and diet, the blander diet and less exercise the milder (read blander) bird you get. Don't go free-range, get store-brand.


6

As setek said in the comments, 43F is too warm. Anything above 40F and you only have a couple hours before it's unsafe (has the potential to make people sick, even if unlikely). And your garage is attached to a house that's well over 40F, so it'll probably be well above 43F in there. So you really need to keep it chilled. If you don't have space in your ...


6

I would pour all the juices into a jug and refrigerate it. The fat will solidify on top, and I would remove that to use for roasting potatoes, saving the juices below for gravy making, with boiling water and gravy granules - quick and simple. This is what I did when cooking roast dinners for 40 to 100 customers every Sunday at my traditional English pub for ...


6

It all depends what you want: Best quality: Fresh, organic, heritage turkey. Order now, pick up maximum 1 week beforehand Good quality, reasonable price: Frozen organic turkey. Buy now Good quality, normal price: Fresh turkey. Order now, pick up maximum 1 week beforehand OK price: Frozen turkey. Buy now Best price: Buy a large chicken and tell everyone it's ...


6

It's perfectly safe if the turkey wasn't kept in the danger zone for longer than the maximum recommended time. If it was kept appropriately cold for the minimal amount of time possible, there's nothing "unsafe" about refreezing anything. What you do lose with refreezing is quality. Freezing is a damaging process for many products, meat included. The reason ...


6

Having done this several times in the past - it is to make the oil flavoured. Like the comments have said that one onion doesn't seem to be enough, and frankly it isn't. I typically use 2, and remove the skins as well as score them allowing the juices to weep out a bit. Additionally, I know some people who toss a de-seeded bell pepper or two in as well, and ...


5

Ignoring food safety for a moment referring to an example like How Clothes Dryers Work in most dryers air enters near the top, is heated by an element at the rear of the dryer but the air is actually being drawn in / out by a fan at the bottom of the unit. The internal temperature of the air ends up being about 175C so most of what is "floating around" in ...


5

You can absolutely cook a turkey without a wire rack. I have done this for years. What I suggest is laying down a grid of celery and carrot sticks, to elevate the turkey a little bit and keep it from sitting in the juices that will come out during cooking. These aromatics will then lend their flavor to the pan drippings, and help you make a fantastic ...


5

A quarter sheet pan is tiny ... 9 x 13. You'd have problems fitting a large chicken on that. If you don't have a place to buy a half-sheet pan, look for places that do appliance repair, and get a broiler pan ... they're of a similar size, and have plenty of uses. (they just don't work for cookies) In the comments of a Serious Eats post on spatchcocked ...


5

I can't remember how many times I've remembered to take out the turkey much to late for a full proper defrost. Yes, you can probably thaw it in cold water. But I would go a step further if you're brining it anyway. Alton Brown posted a blog post yesterday with exactly the same problem as you. Apparently Professional food people forget to defrost their birds ...


5

I'm going to assume that you are smoking with charcoal as electric smokers don't really have trouble with fluctuating temperature. Plan on needing to add charcoal every couple of hours during the entire smoking period. I start mine at unwholesome hours of the morning and set alarms to get up and stoke the fire. It is nice if you can stoke the fire without ...


5

It's fine to thaw for a few (or several) hours under cold water and then put it in the refrigerator. Just keep the water cold and refrigerate immediately upon removing the turkey from the water. The USDA and Butterball are being extremely overly conservative, most likely because a lot of people are really bad at following instructions. Cold water good - warm ...


5

First, let me clarify a linguistic point: Nowadays, both words "sherbet" and "sorbet" have entered the English language as loanwords. They both describe frozen desserts, and I have seen some people use them interchangeably and others making a distinction, e.g. that sorbet is dairy-free and sherbet has dairy. No matter how they are ...


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