9

If you want to make real Turkish delight, use cornstarch and only cornstarch. Nowhere on the Balkan have I seen a gelatine-thickened Turkish delight. No Turkish person will recognize a gelatine-thickened candy as lokum. I would go as far as to insist that aromatzied sugar syrup+gelatine = gummi bear, while aromatized sugar syrup+cornstarch = Turkish delight, ...


9

Yes Turkish coffee grind is finer than esspresso grind. Grinders are typically one of two kinds: Blade grinders, or burr mill/grinders. For a consistent turkish coffee or esspresso grind, it's recommended to get a conical burr grinder they can produce the fine grind you need without heating up the coffee and losing flavor. Also, the better ones tend to not ...


7

I think you got something mixed up there. It is normal to have noticeable particles while drinking Turkish coffee. Everybody uses a strainer for it, and it does result in a slightly "muddy" drink. I guess you could pass the prepared Turkish coffee through a paper coffee filter before drinking, but this would be a very unusual way to do it. People who don't ...


7

There are various techniques, however here's how I do, and I usually get enough foam by making like this. Sometimes really much, sometimes just decent but never too little. First of all, put the water before the coffee to the cezve (or pot, however you call it). Then add the coffee without mixing it with the water. Do not mix it, just let it get into the ...


7

Have you actually boiled it three times? Boiling coffee makes it smell like old floor rags, don't do that! What the Turkish method essentially is, you bring your coffee pot thrice up to, but not actually reaching, the boiling temperature, and you must never ever stir it. My favourite temperature is 70°C near bottom (measured with an electronic meat ...


5

Alibaba has a site that let's you search by region, and indeed there is a page for Turkish chocolate including chocolate covered almonds. As far as I can tell brand names seem to be Tafe and the ChocoVia and Dojo produced by Besler. Those brand names do not exclusively refer to chocolate covered almonds - which are called "chocolate covered almonds" on the ...


5

You will need to have a Turkish coffee pot, a spoon, sugar and coffee that has been ground to a fine powder. Although most people use the Arabica beans, it really doesn't matter what kind of coffee you use. However, it should be a medium roast, because you will actually roast it again while making it. You can get the Turkish coffee in several different ...


5

I have no idea why it starts with Greek yogurt. Wherever I've had it - at home, restaurant-made, or ready-bought, it contained just plain yogurt, water and salt. (The ratio varies to taste). This includes ayran made in traditional Turkish restaurants run by Turkish owners. Also, I can't think of a practical reason why true (strained) Greek yogurt could make ...


5

It depends if you want a nice baklava or a quick one. I am not familiar about the quick baklava, so I will share my tips on delicious baklava: Phyllo pastry needs to be at room temperature before you handle it. Otherwise it retains some of the moisture that make the individual sheets stick to each other. However, do not take it out of the package till you ...


5

Salep is essentially glucomannan; you can subsitutue Salep with Konjac GM (not konjac flour as it might impart a fishy flavor). And this is the key ingredient in Dondurma. When it comes to mastic, you can try to omit it as it's mainly for flavor. Not all Turkish Dondurma is with mastic; you could simply use vanilla... Note: I’ve made Dondurma simply like ...


4

This article from the BBC indicates that it's been illegal to export salep for quite a while. This article indicates that cornflour is frequently used as a substitution for salep. The same author makes four other interesting points about salep. First, the elastic quality of these ‘stretchy’ ice creams is not, as some writers state, due to the ...


4

There is no standard spice mix for Doner Kebabs. This generally applies to any food in any part of the world. There can be a common mix, but as you have experienced, they can be quite specific to certain areas of the world A major factor for noting a common spice mix is the global food supply industry. What happens in general is that food retailers buy bulk ...


3

The temperature at the time of serving doesn't matter. The Ottomans knew how to enjoy life. Coffee was served on social occasions, which happened at a slow pace in that part of the world. The ottoman effendi would spend hours sitting there, smoking a nargileh, endlessly turning the beads of a rosary, and taking a sip of coffee now and then. Even though it ...


3

The main point is: do not let the coffee boil. When foam starts to form, remove it with a spoon and pour into your coffee cup.


3

Turkish coffee requires an extremely fine, powdery, flour-like grind, which is much finer than even a very finely grinding espresso grinder will produce. Grinding 8 oz quantities at a go really requires a commercial grinder, and even those, like the BUNN, require fitting with burrs designed for Turkish coffee. Commercial grinders will have heavier-duty ...


3

From what I can find from various sources in German, a typical "Döner spice blend" includes a lot of black pepper and salt, followed by oregano or marjoram, garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, and cinnamon. Additionally, most retail products include an instant broth powder, and a fair dose of MSG or related "flavor enhancers". Most products will have some ...


3

In the UK I have come across a Doner Kebab Mix that you can buy from local shops or eBay. You may be able to get some information or ideas from that mix. It is very good and better than the kebab i get from my takeaway. Search eBay for Doner Kebab Mix or Seasoning.


3

Ripping Sheets of Filo: The sheets are still cold. The dough will tear near the center wrinkles when it's too cold. Room temp dough allows you to gently pull out all the wrinkles and the dough separates easily. As long as the outer package is sealed, you can leave the dough out for several hours to be sure it warms up. How to handle Filo: Gently bend a ...


2

Either your pastry should be hot and your syrup at room temperature or the other way around. This is a good rule of thumb for all syrup soaked pastries. If both the baklava and syrup are hot when you pour the syrup over you will end up with a goopy mess.


2

The other answers have all explained most of the process really well. So, I'm just going to add a couple of options to make the butter part a lot easier. Use butter flavored cooking spray instead of butter. It's super fast, easy, and convenient. Just spray it on each layer. The result is good, but not quite as good as real butter. The big downside is ...


2

You've got two questions, with 2 different approaches: What is the "authentic" spice mix used in your local region? and What is the spice mix that most appeals to you (or your eaters/customers)? I'm in NYC, and there are easily 100's of gyro, kebab & shwarma food trucks, plus a host of "authentic" and "fusion-style" Middle Eastern/N. African/W. Asian ...


2

Turkish coffee requires a stone mill. Not a burr mill. A stone mill, like the one that is used for making flour. It is rather expensive, very heavy and hard to find in countries where Turkish coffee is not popular (as in Turkey itself, Hellas and Arab countries). A burr mill, even a professional one with conical burrs, needs to be pushed to its very limits ...


2

I made turkish coffee with noticeable particles when I was about 7 yo, due to me not knowing that I should remove it from the heat only when the foam around the edge starts moving to the center, pretty much like this: So are you sure you are boiling it enough time? What is the best practical way to filter the Turkish coffee? You won't need a strainer. ...


2

After you have finished brewing the Turkish coffee let it sit for a few minutes. Pour slowly into your mug stopping when you see the coffee turn cloudy. Immediately add sugar/milk to your own mug and stir. Don't stir again. The coffee grounds will settle to the bottom and become a clay like consistency. This way you will get very little ground in the ...


2

So, I've checked some books (see below), and according to them you have two issues: (1) your finger dents aren't deep enough (puffing up), and (2) your oven is too hot. All three of the recipes I found for pide bake it at 220C. Cooking it at 400C is likely what is causing it's more pizza-like texture. The oven in the video appears to be hotter than that, ...


1

As the answer to the linked question states, original Turkish delight is made using only cornstarch. I understand you're asking specifically about the recipe linked and how it differs from other recipes. I'll try to answer the following points: Q: Why do some recipes call other gelling agents such as gelatin, next to cornstarch. A: Like most thickeners, ...


1

I believe you're talking about the breaking of emulsion. The solution is to simply whip it again, a food processor should also be fine for Kaymak.


1

Well, all you really need to make turkish coffee is the pot (ibrik or cezve), coffee, sugar, and water. The coffee should be very finely ground and is usually spiced. Most Middle Eastern grocery stores will carry Turkish coffee, but sometimes it is also called Arabic coffee or Greek coffee. The only difference I've noticed was that, at least in the brands ...


1

An old discussion, but others will come, as I just did, via a search. Grinding coffee very fine, to powder, as required for Turkish coffee, requires more torque than is available with home grinders; heavy-duty commercial grinders will do the job. If you don't want an expensive and large grinder, either buy coffee ready-ground for Turkish (keep it ...


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