61

The handle of the round plastic object feels really distinctive to me. It would clearly work with a normal hammer-like grip, but it also has the thumb-print inviting the user to choke the grip up close and apply lots of force. I'm pretty sure it's for scraping. The metal tool is a bit confusing; it looks like it could cut, but it's clearly not a knife. ...


49

It's a lemon/lime wedge juice squeezer. Only place I've ever really seen them used is in British Indian restaurants. Pop a wedge in the gap, squeeze the handles, juice can be poured with reasonable accuracy from any of the fluted edges. No messy fingers. Image from Amazon


18

This is an ice crusher. You put some cubes (or use your ice pick to cut a hunk off from a large block), put it in the compartment, and squeeze it closed. Those gnarly bumps and teeth will crush the ice. I would personally consider it more "home bar equipment" for crushing ice for cocktails, though that's certainly not the only use. As mentioned in ...


14

I found a Swiss website that offers a similar set of tools, called «Ustensiles à courge», which translates to «Squash utensils». Squash utensils I believe that @ShapeOfMatter correctly identified the purpose, so I am givng that person the correct answer status...


5

It's an egg slice - like a fish slice but more curved & wider. It's for flipping/serving fried eggs… though tbh I just use a fish slice for anything like that. Your only problem with searching it is 'egg slice' brings up a million hits for slicing eggs, so 'egg slice spatula' or 'egg fish slice spatula' might hone it down a bit. Lots of manufacturers ...


5

You do not need to throw out the pan Metals tend to be impervious to absorption of much in the way of plastics (or anything else), which is part of the reason they make great cooking implements. If the plastic is on the cooking surface and that surface was seasoned, to be absolutely sure, I would recommend that you remove the seasoning and re-season. If ...


4

It could also be a form of grapefruit knife I believe.


3

Best guess without knowing your water supply composition; it's not the pan contaminating the water, it's the water contaminating the pan. Iif you live in an area with certified potable water, it's really mainly visual, it won't hurt. After comments Yup, London water - safe, potable… but ugly. You can either scrub after every use, or ignore until it annoys ...


3

It's really easy to cure generally. The main cause, be they cheap or otherwise, is the non forced roller cog (not the one attached to the twister, but the one that sits below the circular blade) siezes up with rust. A vigorous blast with an old toothbrush, then undo the Phillips screw and remove. Carefully pull the blade and cog off - remember it's meant to ...


2

The description sounds like a "popcorn hammer" sometimes also called a "popcorn cannon": popcorn hammer The US TV show Mythbusters did an episode on this gadget a few years back. Essentially, it is a cast metal pressure vessel that is used to make popcorn/puffed grains. It can be used over an open flame, allowing street vendors to use them to create both ...


1

Definitely white vinegar but ten to fifteen minutes is plenty. The vinegar can discolor the metal of the shaker or take the plating off. This worked perfectly for me. I had two that were utterly stuck. Like never coming off. And the vinegar did the trick. You can see the corrosion on the top one.


1

A sauteuse pan is a very versatile pan. If you have no lid, it's a great pan for sautéing and browning. With a thin layer of oil you can cook vegetables, scallops, latkes, etc. If you have lids that fit you can braise in these. You can also use to cook pasta, stews, etc. Copper is good conductor, so these should heat evenly. I also sometimes use a pan like ...


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