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12

No, vodka is nothing like vanilla extract. Unfortunately the premise of your question is wrong. The thing that makes "true" vanilla extract true/pure/real is that it's made from real vanilla beans, as opposed to artificial flavors. Artificial vanilla is often just vanillin, one of the key flavor components, and it's been manufactured from another base ...


11

1 tbsp pure vanilla bean paste = 1 vanilla bean 1 tbsp pure vanilla bean paste = 1 tbsp vanilla bean extract From experience I'd say the extract and the paste are equivalent in flavour. The vanilla bean paste has the added texture of the seeds, which I prefer. Of course neither of them leave you with a bean case to use as a garnish when your done creating! ...


11

It means vanilla extract. Whether it's correct or not is hard to say. It does sound like a lot for something with those quantities, so it's possible they meant to say a teaspoon, which is a pretty common amount, resulting in a subtle but noticeable flavor in a batch of chocolate chip cookies, for example. Or it's possible they just wanted whatever it is ...


9

One of the first things you'll need to consider is that the creme de cacao is already chocolate-flavored. Vodka is very clean and neutrally flavored, so if you use it to make an extract you'll get a very pure flavor extraction from whatever you're infusing. If you use something that's flavored already, the end result will obviously contain those flavors too. ...


8

It's a flavor. It's on the subtle side, particularly in the quantities it's often used in, and maybe if you've eaten a ton of vanilla ice cream you don't notice it anymore. (Or maybe you just haven't had very good vanilla ice cream.) The flavor is either from the vanilla bean if it's fancy vanilla ice cream, or more likely from artificially produced ...


7

I've been making rum-based vanilla extract successfully at home for years. Here are my recommendations. Your basic ingredients are 80 proof rum, sugar and vanilla beans. At the recommended proportions, the rum and sugar are plenty effective preservatives. You can use either light or dark rum, but it should be a good "call" 80 proof rum and not a bargain ...


7

If you have not tried mixing it into drinks yet then I'd encourage you give it a shot. Although the alcohol smell is strong in the bottle the vanilla flavor is much more concentrated, once you dilute it in something else the alcohol should be unnoticeable. There's no way to get the alcohol out of the extract without destroying the vanilla itself, heating ...


7

There's not really a European equivalent for the FDA's definition of extract (by ethanol percentage). Instead, the EU specifies what constitutes natural vs 'vanilla flavouring' (euphemism for 'artificial'). See the EU's white paper on it here (notably page 15): AUTHENTICITY OF VANILLA AND VANILLA EXTRACTS Also, in plainer speak, info on vanilla industry ...


6

Liquid vanilla extract has alcohol in it, so if you add this extract to hot cocoa, puddings, fudge, or anything you make with heat, the alcohol burns off and so does most of the flavor. If you wait for it to cool off the flavor stays strong. Same thing goes for artificial vanilla also because of the alcohol levels (but the flavor is just not there to begin ...


6

The vanilla chapter of Ian Hemphill's "Spice and Herb Bible" says, Vanilla is also delicious in savory cooking because it is not overtly sweet. An innovative Mauritian restaurant in Sydney served a delicious vanilla chicken [...] It was aromatic delicate and beautifully balanced. The same book has a recipe for Vanilla Salmon Salad where vanilla ...


6

As mentioned in a previous response, Cooks Illustrated did a test some years ago (2003, I think), where they concluded that the preferred vanilla in a taste test was some cheap artificial vanilla from a local drugstore's generic section or something. They have since done further tests (such as this one in 2009), and real vanilla sometimes edges out the ...


6

You can find many instructions on the web for how to make your own vanilla extract, such as this one from Beanilla. As Derobert mentions, it is essentially just soaking the beans ins spirits long enough for the flavors to infuse. The beans you buy will determine the flavor profile. To make Mexican vanilla extract, you would buy pods imported from Mexico. ...


6

"Pure vanilla extract is made by macerating and percolating vanilla beans in a solution of ethyl alcohol and water." [Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla_extract] There is alcohol in it, that's why it smells like it has alcohol in it :) So it is perfectly normal. Personally, I find extracts and essences of vanilla to be a complete waste. To get ...


6

My best experience is that you should use 1/4 teaspoon of the vanillin powder for each teaspoon of vanilla extract. I use it for bread dough, donut dough, but never for icing.


6

My best guess would be what Stephie already hinted at: "1 vanilla sugar" means "one sachet of vanilla sugar". I have seen these in different European countries, and they normally contain the "standard" amount of synthetic vanillin to flavor a recipe of up to 500 g of flour, and just a little bit of sugar, not to make it sweet, but to make it easier to handle,...


6

Slice the pod in half, long ways, carefully. Run your knife blade down the length,scraping the tiny seeds (very tiny) from the inside of the pod. What you collect will be sticky and not look like much, but it is very potent. Place what you collected into your pudding mixture while cooking. One pod should be plenty. You can also toss in the whole pod at ...


6

I think the idea of the vodka is that it is an almost tasteless alcohol solution which is good for two reasons. In the quantities added it would likely evaporate or remain in very small amounts and that the aromatics in the vanilla would dissolve in it. Considering there's other forms of vanilla (including alcohol free or powdered) varients, and how ...


6

According to the FDA vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35 percent alcohol ("TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS"). That's roughly on par with vodka. There's no such thing as flavorless alcohol. Ethanol has a flavor ("Bitter and sweet components of ethanol taste in humans") and alcohol (at least, when the dilution is greater than 35 percent) produces a burning ...


6

My honest answer is you don't without a lot of experimentation. 1.5 cups of cocoa powder is a significant portion of the recipe, taking it out will throw out every other measurement and there is no easy way to calculate what adjustments you'd need to make. Vanilla powder is much stronger a flavor than cocoa powder and cannot be a direct substitute. If you ...


5

There are different products sold as "vanilla powder". What I have seen is pure synthetic vanillin crystals, without maltodextrine or other stuff in it. Generally, I would recommend using the extract if available. It is always made from the real plant, and the alcohol dissolves many different flavor compounds from the plant. Even if the powder is a dried ...


5

I have a bottle of imitation vanilla extract that's water based. I know from experience that adding it to a hot liquid results in a strong imitation vanilla scent being released into the air, which means less imitation vanilla flavor is staying in the liquid. I think it's safe to say that it wouldn't evaporate nearly as quickly as an alcohol based extract, ...


5

Personally the only way I've ever achieved a good suspension of vanilla in my Brûlée's is by cooking the custard over a bain-marie until thick and... custard like. Once it's nice and thick I'll then pour it into my molds and then bake them for 10-15 min at around 110°c just to finish off. Be very careful not to over cook them the last thing you want, after ...


5

Real vanilla extract is made by dissolving the important compounds in alcohol. Thus alcohol is inherent to the extract. In fact in the US a minimum alcohol content is required (presumably for preservation). It's normally used in quantities small enough that you wouldn't taste the alcohol, and often cooked for some time (e.g. in a cake). Your best bet is ...


5

Your assumption is totally wrong. Putting several vanilla beans in vodka and soaking makes excellent vanilla extract ( the remainder my 1.75L is a couple years old). When I use it the alcohol evaporates immediately and I have never detected any residual alcohol. Don't know about "bitterness" in vanilla.


4

Slice bean in half. Use knife blade to scrape seeds out of bean. Scrape seeds from blade into milk as you are heating. Added bonus: toss scraped vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar to create vanilla sugar. Best flavor release of vanilla into a fat-based mixture is achieved during heating.


4

I have family in Reunion Island - one top seller of bourbon vanilla. The only vodka they have there is imported, and rhum (or rum if you prefer to spell it that way) is readily available. Personally I would recommend: 150 ml / 5 oz. of neutral alcohol (e.g. rhum, vodka, eau-de-vie) 2 beans 8 weeks (6 min) without light, occasional shake You can also use ...


4

Vanilla acts sort of like salt. It is not just there to add flavor but to enhance the flavors around it.


4

is there some other reason it is popular? Yes: Vanilla beans are expensive, and once you've extracted the seeds, the husk, which still contains good vanilla flavor, is often discarded. Putting the empty husk in sugar allows you to extract some vanilla flavor that might otherwise be wasted. I usually save my empty vanilla bean pods and use them for making ...


4

Oak aging can indeed produce real vanillin, whether in wines or other liquids (spirits, beer, even vinegars can all be oak-aged) among thousands of other flavorful compounds. Somewhat surprisingly, it seems that vanillin is commonly synthesized for use in artificial vanilla extracts from lignin, a fibrous compound that serves to strengthen the cell walls in ...


4

If your pastry cream can handle being stirred (most do and as you will be including whipped cream anyway), you should be fine. Stirring will soften your pastry cream a bit, but not make it completely liquid. You can even add the vanilla to your cream, whip it together and need not worry about stirring well enough or uneven distribution of liquid in your ...


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