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49

My response to this kind of question is always just ask, and if you absolutely can't, err on the side of caution. I'm assuming here that you're talking about a pretty thorough heating and brushing. If you're leaving a bunch of meat stuff on the grill, that someone could conceivably taste, that's not good - you certainly shouldn't be risking food that ...


30

Depends on the person but typically... no. I'm not sure how bad cross contamination is in terms of food safety, but grills are high heat, though you might not always heat the food through. Many observant vegetarians however would minimally prefer separate dedicated utensils and cooking surfaces not used for meat. I personally wouldn't eat it, as a ...


27

I have done no testing of this at all but I was surprised to find on this site that they recommend trying a spoon full (or cube of) sugar. Perhaps the easiest way of calming down a flaming mouth is by sucking on a sugar cube or holding a teaspoon of sugar in your mouth. This helps by absorbing the spicy oil that is coating your mouth, as well as giving ...


27

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...


18

A vegan is not going to eat your pan, just the food that was made on it. As no animals were harmed in the making of your pan (well, probably but how would you know) the pan itself wouldn't be an issue. Of course if a tiny bit of pan seasoning could go into the food, however anything else used in the preparation of the meal like cutting boards could cause a ...


16

You'd have to ask your vegan to be absolutely sure. If they're practical, they'll acknowledge that there might be a bit of meat fat polymerized onto the pan but they won't be actually eating it, as long as you've seasoned and cleaned well. If however they're sufficiently strict, they could conceivably say, no, it's touching an animal product, I won't eat it. ...


15

Avocado would be the classic answer IME (often in the form of guacamole, but not required to be in that form.) AFAIK it's the fat effectively diluting the hot pepper oil in either case, (where it's unaffected by water since it won't mix) rather than any enzyme. ...and then there's not making the food so spicy it's uncomfortable (horribly unfashionable, I ...


13

Imagine if someone grilled a cat or dog, and then rinsed the grill surface to cook your burger. Would you be happy? This is how you have to think about it. I am not vegan or vegetarian but used to live with someone who is. I always used separate pots and pans and utensils. Don't recall ever having a cook out or how I handled that. You can designate one of ...


13

Sugar won't dissolve in cocoa butter. Or in coconut oil, for that matter. When making chocolate, the sugar is smoothed and kept in suspension by prolonged grinding, conching, which is really a mechanical process... and one of the reasons making actual chocolate at home is very rare, absent specialized equipment, as the sugar crystals will not dissolve and ...


11

There's a great answer to this from Vietnam, where super-spicy food is popular and dairy generally isn't. It combines many of the other suggestions into something wonderfully smooth and soothing: Avocado and coconut milk smoothie Here's one example recipe and pic. Note that in Vietnam, they love (non-vegan) condensed milk and tend to add it to everything -...


10

The differences are as follows: Quinoa is a pseudocerial coming from goosefoot wikipedia. It is one of the trendy "superfoods" because it has a very high nutritional value ánd is gluten free. I have always used it as a grain substitute and do not know if it's any good as the main ingredient for a burger. Quorn is a meat substitute made of mycoprotein from ...


10

Flour paste. Mix flour with water and a bit of salt. Go for a thick glaze-like consistency, and use it instead of the egg. Give it at least 10 minutes to hold before frying, and try to hold the edges closed with tongs when initially frying.


9

A gravy tastes like gravy because it has salt and glutamates, which is what yeast extract has been formulated to deliver. There is no vegan replacement. The only good way to produce glutamates in your kitchen is to sear meat. You can certainly make a veloute sauce instead of a gravy. It is made from stock and roux. Roux is a combination of fat and starch - ...


9

Try a nut milk (almond comes to mind), soy milk or coconut milk. Here's a highly rated recipe for vegan "Sour Cream".


9

There is a huge variety of motivations and feelings involved in the choice to not eat meat. If you're serving a large group, it would be best to choose the safest option and use separate surfaces and implements. However, if just serving some close friends, it may be worth asking them if this is suitable, assuming you are confident this question will not ...


9

Many of the modern "vegan butter-like spreads for cooking" have a passable butter flavor, not like the margarines of yore. You do want to get one that mentions it can be used in cooking/baking, rather than the "light" versions that are nearly half water. That's a fairly simple substitution. I'm knee-jerking away from suggesting a specific brand, both to be ...


9

The non-vegan ingredients are the egg and the ghee (clarified butter, browned to develop the nutty flavours). For the ghee you can substitute the same quantity of olive oil, possibly with some loss of flavour. The egg is harder to replace. You could try a commercial egg replacement: these are powdered starch (one product uses potato and tapioca flour, so ...


8

Assuming TVP is what you used... it is essentially a byproduct of the production of tofu, and as such is largely tasteless on its own. Generally, to use it you first rehydrate it with a 1:1-1.5 ratio of TVP to liquid. The liquid can be pretty much anything, from water, to broth, mustard, ketchup, liquid smoke, etc. Very similar to tofu, it will absorb the ...


8

I am a vegetarian and I am totally put off by the idea of seasoned pans that don't get cleaned with soap and water. One of the reasons I am a vegetarian is because I consider meat to be unclean (not a religious objection, just my own many-years' judgment), and I won't eat out of a pan I would consider uncleaned, which seasoned pans would be to me. It isn't ...


8

I've always liked the bread solution more than the dairy solution. It somehow feels to me that bread "mops up" the spicy stuff from my mucosa, while dairy dissolves it, but also spreads it around in my mouth. Maybe it's just a matter of personal preference, but when you can't have dairy, and even when you can, bread is worth to try. Just a piece of fresh ...


8

The meaty taste is Umami. It is the flavour of monosodium glutamate, in the same way that salty is the flavour of salt. Both mushrooms and tomatoes of the right variety are quite rich in it, as is yeast extract. You can also just buy the stuff commercially. Don't worry about the stigma attached to it, it's not actually toxic or anything.


8

They're a thing, though mostly eaten in India and other parts of asia . Banana Blossoms are actually typically found as a great big bundle like this You basically need to remove the purple 'cover' to get the little yellow flowers The little yellow things are the edible parts though you need to manually remove the stamen from each. They're slightly bitter ...


8

Summary Pure coconut oil is not an adequate replacement for butter in this recipe. However, coconut oil and water appears to work as a substitution when using ratios between 4:1 and a 5:1 coconut oil to water by mass. Cookies produced with pure coconut oil fall apart when touched. Ratios of 4:1 and 13:2 coconut oil:water worked in my test. However, the ...


8

Aquafaba in cooking generally refers to chickpea aquafaba, but the term generally applies to the liquid in which any legume seeds have been cooked. It contains starches and proteins which allow it to foam when whipped. I have seen aquafaba mostly used for foams in cooking, but it can serve as a replacement for egg whites in many recipes. Adding cream of ...


7

You could always try using vegetable, corn, or light/regular olive oil, vegan margarine, or light corn syrup thinned with a bit of water (to prevent over browning): Wikipedia - Egg wash Yahoo answers - Vegan replacement for egg wash? I also saw something here that mentioned the use of soy milk, but you said it didn't brown well. If it didn't brown at all, ...


7

An effective method I've recently tried is using date honey, diluted with water or almond milk at a ratio of 1:1. Another fine substitute is carob syrup, diluted similarly. Due to the dark color of both ingredients, browning is guaranteed. The two options also work well for browning grilled vegetables or tofu.


7

I'm pretty sure the word "live" means that it's raw and uncooked. I found a recipe for Raw Mushroom and Spinach Lasagna that's very similar to the menu item you describe. It uses zucchini "noodles", cashew "ricotta", along with marinated mushrooms, and tomato sauce to make a raw and meatless "lasagna". The only apparent difference is that the recipe calls ...


7

Vitamin B12 is stored in the liver and muscle of animals, and is also passed on to eggs and milk, so these are good sources for non-vegans. Humans produce B12 in the gut, but cannot absorb it. Many other animals produce it in the gut too, so unwashed plants that have been fertilized with animal feces may be a source of B12. However, there are many other ...


7

It is simply because jackfruit has a consistency and texture that makes it very well suited in a substitute for pulled pork. Apparently, you can also use hearts of palm, but according to an earlier question, it's harder to acquire and not as good as jackfruit. Here's a mushroom-based recipe. A google search for "vegan pulled pork -jackfruit" renders many ...


7

"Dairy-free margarine" is available at any supermarket. It's half the price of a supermarket 'econo-saver' butter, pound for pound & a quarter the price of a premium, Lurpak, President etc. If you want something a bit less 'artificial' try a spray of olive oil & a light sprinkle of salt. Half the point of putting butter on corn is the added salt ...


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