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8

Aquafaba in cooking generally refers to chickpea aquafaba, but the term generally applies to the liquid in which any legume seeds have been cooked. It contains starches and proteins which allow it to foam when whipped. I have seen aquafaba mostly used for foams in cooking, but it can serve as a replacement for egg whites in many recipes. Adding cream of ...


7

"Dairy-free margarine" is available at any supermarket. It's half the price of a supermarket 'econo-saver' butter, pound for pound & a quarter the price of a premium, Lurpak, President etc. If you want something a bit less 'artificial' try a spray of olive oil & a light sprinkle of salt. Half the point of putting butter on corn is the added salt ...


6

Fatty acids are not the emulsifiers here. Long chain fatty acids are excellent for emulsification, if they are deprotonated. But then they would be called “fatty acid salts”, and their flavor would be soapy - bitter. If they're neutral fatty acids, they're not ionized enough to retain a sphere of water around the micelle, and block aggregation of the ...


6

Your question is based on several misconceptions, I'm afraid. The very short answer would be, "don't do it". First, you cannot add more baking powder without affecting the taste, baking powder is already there at levels that affect the taste in standard recipes. If you add more, it'll be noticeable. Second, my first point left out baking soda on purpose. ...


6

Vegan cheeses are typically mot made by curdling a vegan milk. As you have noticed, vegan milks don't curdle when you introduce an acid. Vegan cheeses tend to be made by either making a nut paste with some add-ins to give it a nice flavour and texture, or by thickening a vegan milk mixture with some starch or agar agar.


4

Yes, most of the fat, starch and flavour of the oats ends up in the milk, so what you have left is mostly fibre. Dough or batter made from it won't gelatinize much if at all, so will not hold together when cooked like regular oat flour. Sometimes I add the residue to baked goods (along with wheat flour) in small quantities. It seems to work OK in cakes and ...


4

It's impossible to say what it is - but I am quite sure what it isn't. I have never seen or heard of a pathogen (mold or otherwise) which is able to build visible colonies during such a short time at room temperature, especially in the presence of yeast. And your yeast was not dead - the dough rising proves it. This is almost sure some ingredient not being ...


4

Well this is ... disturbing. Switching to a different brand of soy milk let me succeed on the first try. I have no idea what the manufacturer of my usual brand does to it, but after more testing, even water+lecithine works better than that brand of soy milk. I hope it's okay to answer my own question. For anyone who comes across this via Google in the ...


4

I'm a baker with vegan son and vegan customers. This is best substitute!! vegan Romano: 3/4 cup (115 grams) of raw cashews 4 tablespoons (20 grams) of nutritional yeast 3/4 teaspoon of sea salt 1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon of onion powder Instructions: Place all ingredients in a food processor. Pulse until the mixture is a fine meal texture. ...


3

You misunderstand what eggs are for in cookies. Eggs add moisture, protein and fat. Protein helps give the eggs a bit of chewiness, the moisture helps give the cookie structure and the fat richness. Egg in a cookie gives no leavening effect, and you can take them out, adding extra moisture and fat to make up for them. You can do without the protein, or you ...


3

I'd say young green peas are a good bet. They belong to the broader bean family, which is in itself very high protein. However, many beans can't be eaten raw, be it because they can't be digested or are even a bit toxic when raw. Young green peas on the other hand have a good amount of protein while they still can be eaten raw, about 2.5-6g per 100g, ...


2

To add to @moscafj's answer: There is a saying "There's no such thing as poison, there's only dose". If you take too much of anything, it can be hazardous to your health or wellbeing. Your body needs both calcium and magnesium to function properly, but taking too much can cause you issues as well. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride can cause burns if ...


2

Heating oatmilk basically works on the same principle as heating any other thing with starch like a roux or thickening soup/gravy with cornstarch. To get less thickening, add less starch i.e. less oats content per liter of water. To compensate for lack of flavor blend it with any other type of plant based milk, like soymilk (protein-based) or cashew milk(...


2

Zambian Chikanda has a meat (more of processed meat/saussage) like texture, it’s made using ground peanuts and orchid tubers. The polysaccharide (glucomannan) in the orchid tubers once cooked above a certain pH level, will form a heat stable gel upon cooling. I think this texture is what you’re looking for. Even though you say you have tried Konjac powder (...


2

There's actually very little caffeine in chocolate. So little in fact that decaffeinating it in any kind of economical fashion is next to impossible. Scientists have done it in the lab, but doing it on a scale where you could actually buy it at a reasonable price remains out of reach for most. If you feel like chocolate leaves you 'wired' it's probably down ...


2

Batters are not shelf stable. It doesn't matter if their ingredients are shelf stable by themselves or not. So you have to follow the basic food safety rules for non-shelf-stable food. In particular, you have to ensure (no matter by what means) that it doesn't spend more than 4 hours with an internal temperature between 4 and 60 degrees Celsius. If you can ...


2

There are products which are used as a substitute for cocoa. Carob comes to mind. While it obviously doesn't have the same aroma, you can still try making the substitution. Just use carob powder instead of cocoa powder. If you also have to replace cocoa butter, it becomes more difficult. No other fat performs exactly like cocoa butter, but at least this is ...


2

Your recipe calls for a 2:1 ratio (by volume) of oil to soy milk. In normal mayonnaise recipes, the oil:water ratio is 5:1 or more. I honestly can't see that recipe ever producing anything but soup. Try quadrupling the oil.


2

There is no substitute when it comes to cookies. Aquafaba is an egg white substitute that can be whipped into peaks, but it would make cookies too runny without any benefit. Vegan cookie recipes make up for the lack of eggs with a bit of extra margarine or coconut oil and maybe a spoon or two of milk substitute. Rather than trying to adapt a recipe I would ...


2

Try feeling the texture of the spots. If they are clumpy when you press down on them, it might be a case of flour clumping together when mixing. Otherwise, if the texture is smooth, it might be something else.


2

Apart from flavour, the two main issues you might encounter when substituting margarine for butter are: Different fat content. There are margarines explicitly produced and marketed as low-fat options. For baking, you do not want these. As butter usually/always (depending on your location) has a fat content of 80%, you want to substitute an ingredient with a ...


1

Based on your response to my comment, it appears that you have undissolved salt in your dough. I've seen this before. You can use kosher salt when baking bread, just be sure to add it at a stage when there is enough liquid to dissolve it.


1

It would be useful to see the whole recipe, but the answer is probably no. Egg whites are protein and water, and yolks are fat, protein, and water, and each contributes important things to cakes. There is complicated chemistry going on, and you can't just eliminate the eggs from a recipe like this. Carbonation does nothing. However, if your recipe calls for, ...


1

I have made eggless mayonnaise before. For your quantity, in addition to the lecithin, add 5 tsp of modified cornstarch and 1/4 tsp or more of xanthan gum. Fine tune from there as I use less oil.


1

While chocolate is technically very low in caffeine, it has a not-insignificant amount of theobromine, a metabolite of caffeine. Unfortunately, if you are so sensitive to caffeine that Hershey's chocolate syrup (and I would suspect decaffeinated coffee) affects you, there may not be much you can do with raw chocolate. While CO2, solvent, and Swiss Water ...


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