Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

7

Summary Pure coconut oil is not an adequate replacement for butter in this recipe. However, coconut oil and water appears to work as a substitution when using ratios between 4:1 and a 5:1 coconut oil to water by mass. Cookies produced with pure coconut oil fall apart when touched. Ratios of 4:1 and 13:2 coconut oil:water worked in my test. However, the ...


7

"Dairy-free margarine" is available at any supermarket. It's half the price of a supermarket 'econo-saver' butter, pound for pound & a quarter the price of a premium, Lurpak, President etc. If you want something a bit less 'artificial' try a spray of olive oil & a light sprinkle of salt. Half the point of putting butter on corn is the added salt ...


5

First rule of the microwave... Always use a loose-fitting lid. It reduces the cleaning frequency of the interior from once a day to every 6 months or so ;) I'm pretty sure that unless you want to prod every single legume with a cocktail stick before putting it in the microwave, then you can only do so much to mitigate this issue. Closed containers will go '...


4

If they're your first batch, you did great! Can you show us a cut cross-section? A croissant will have "intra-layer" (inside the dough layers) rise and "inter-layer" (between the layers) rise: The intra-layer rise comes from the yeast and moisture action in the dough itself, and the inter-layer comes from the steam generated as the moisture in the butter/...


3

I'd say young green peas are a good bet. They belong to the broader bean family, which is in itself very high protein. However, many beans can't be eaten raw, be it because they can't be digested or are even a bit toxic when raw. Young green peas on the other hand have a good amount of protein while they still can be eaten raw, about 2.5-6g per 100g, ...


2

You don't have enough fat I think. I would use 2 to 3 times as much if I was making croissants with butter. I don't know how vegan margarine reacts but you may want to at least double the amount. The fat plays a major role in the fluffy goodness (yes, technical term...) of the texture while the croissants bake, as it traps the water evaporating from your ...


2

To add to @moscafj's answer: There is a saying "There's no such thing as poison, there's only dose". If you take too much of anything, it can be hazardous to your health or wellbeing. Your body needs both calcium and magnesium to function properly, but taking too much can cause you issues as well. Calcium chloride and magnesium chloride can cause burns if ...


2

Heating oatmilk basically works on the same principle as heating any other thing with starch like a roux or thickening soup/gravy with cornstarch. To get less thickening, add less starch i.e. less oats content per liter of water. To compensate for lack of flavor blend it with any other type of plant based milk, like soymilk (protein-based) or cashew milk(...


1

Heating the water will speed up absorption. The question is by how much and if it’s worth the extra time? I have made many recipes with flax as an egg substitute. I don’t ever recall boiling the water. I can’t think of any of them that didn’t turn out as intended. Do you have any links for the recipes that recommend this?


1

Nutritional yeast is not something you can make at home. Nutritional yeast is produced by culturing a yeast in a nutrient medium for several days. The primary ingredient in the growth medium is glucose, often from either sugarcane or beet molasses. You can make it yourself but you will need an industrial setup and large investment. It is cheaply available ...


1

Zambian Chikanda has a meat (more of processed meat/saussage) like texture, it’s made using ground peanuts and orchid tubers. The polysaccharide (glucomannan) in the orchid tubers once cooked above a certain pH level, will form a heat stable gel upon cooling. I think this texture is what you’re looking for. Even though you say you have tried Konjac powder (...


1

Try coconut cream. I have moved away from coconut milk except for soups. Coconut cream is also in cans and is lovely, with much less wateriness and great flavor. It is often semisolid right out of the can but melts in the pan. The mammal miracle is that milk holds fat in suspension. I suspect this is trickier for coconuts. The cream is fattier and so ...


1

Yes-ish. Managed to make something similar with margarine, almond milk, flour and nutritional yeast flakes (was going for a cheese-style sauce for mac and vegan-cheese). Don't ask me for the recipe, I don't have exact ratio but here's my order of operations: boil almond milk, add mustard, flour, salt and any other seasonings you want, then once a boil has ...


1

I do not think that there is a definite time period that can be given for this question. In the UK, and I think this is the same for all of Europe, foods that do not spoil because of microbes are given a minimum expected lifespan. Companies fully complying with the law do not need to invest any more money in, i.e. bother to research, finding an upper limit. ...


1

The Beyond Meat burgers that are coming out are pretty close to meat-tasting. If you weren't paying attention, you might miss the difference. Not sure how many stores carry them, but the A&W fast food chain carries them in Canada as Impossible Burgers. (note: my comment about sodium content probably still stands with these so I would not make a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible