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My favorite tool is a spiral cutter sold for apples or potatoes, here’s an example. (Source) A tiny screw-plus-rotating-knife gadget is often used for Bavarian radish spirals, e.g.: (Source) Note that both types will produce spirals without waste, so to achieve the look in your question, you have to gently pull the cut vegetable lengthwise. Depending on ...


5

There are tools specifically designed to do this with pineapple. You could use them on other foods or a large enough diameter, and not too hard. You'd need to hold the turns open a bit to make it look like a screw thread, and the core is also removed Despite the name, spiralisers don't produce tidy spirals very often or easily, but something more like ...


4

I recommend looking at studies conducted in a scientific manner, instead of relying on anecdotal evidence. The link below covers a pretty good effort by graduate students, concludes microwaving is good. However, if you are having fun doing the blanching, then do it. Being happy and sharing your cooking with appreciative guests is a great way to spend a ...


4

It's called a spiralizer They come in many shapes & sizes - this BBC Good Food guide has a selection


2

Years passed since the question was asked, but finally mainstream chefs do recommend microwaving food. David Chang in particular - he even came up with a cookware line for microwave. In this interview, he says I’d suggest cooking vegetables in your microwave. You’ll be amazed at how perfectly and fast they cook, all while staying crisp and delicious. ...


1

Apart from the risk of bacteria and fungal spores that may be lurking in the tightly curled fronds of the Fiddlehead ferns (this means ONLY ostrich ferns - no other kind). There are many soil and waterborne parasites that may also be there due the nature of the sites where Fiddleheads like to grow. If you like playing roulette with your health you may not ...


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