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the image is one kind of green onion leaves....


4

This is two years past, and I'm sure the original poster and replyers have long forgotten about this thread. But I wanted to leave my comment in case any new readers came across this... Different brands of celery have different flavors. (Also, there are a few different types of celery lmao but let me not confuse you) Mostly, it's in the brands. I don't ...


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It's probably green almonds like bob1 suggested. We eat them raw as a fruit or they can be pickled. They are called Oja in the Syrian region عوجا.


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I suspect that these will be pickled almonds. Almonds are a favorite ingredient in many middle-Eastern dishes. The green color and fuzz give it away, most other fruits like apricots and plums lack enough fuzz to be noticeable at the unripe stage and are very hard when unripe. I found a recipe with this photo: Are these are what you are after?


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All yams are best when they are baked at 400 degrees F. Put them on a cookie sheet on top of a piece of foil to catch the drips. This is the best way to preserve the flavor and sweetness. They are done when the skin puffs up and they are soft to the touch. The purple yams are dryer than the orange ones, but they still have a nice flavor. My favorite ...


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The number one reason is that the vegetables will start to fall apart, and thawing and refreezing them will destroy their texture. If you don't mind that, you don't really need to worry about it.


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The problem is two fold. First is that thawing and unthawing make more and more water to penetrate to "object" breaking the cells. IMO such food (meat or veggies) become woody in texture and making it less tasty (sometimes I would even say I taste the freezer ice not the food). Second is more serious. Bacteria. There are some bacteria, especially in your ...


4

The main effect that reduces the quality of food that is stored in the freezer is freezer burn. This is basically dehydration, caused by the very dry air in the freezer. Any container that seals airtight prevents this from happening, so your vegetables should stay good. With glass containers, you may have to be careful to prevent them from cracking. If ...


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You absolutely can fry in cream, and it has several advantages over oil. Food52 and Ideas In Food have plenty of recipes that all work great. https://food52.com/recipes/81961-caramelized-cream-eggs-from-ideas-in-food


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Simple answer, the thicker the vegetable the older it is. The older it is the tougher and especially more fibrous, the skin and the stalk in general is. You'll see the same with any green stalky vegetable (eg: Broccoli). It's peeled especially with the older plant, as if it's old enough it could be quite fibrous. It looks like the first picture isn't peeled. ...


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