New answers tagged

4

I believe that this advice is strictly your local Chinese grocer, and does not apply in general or anywhere else. I have shopped at many different Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean grocery stores in several different US cities. I have Chinese friends that I cook with. I have never been personally advised to remove the flowers before. Further, I checked ...


13

I would say there may be more insects in the flowers, but that is not a big deal. The ones not removed by normal washing or possibly a saltwater rinse will mostly at least be tiny ones attracted by the flowers and will not affect quality and taste. Some would even callously call it extra protein. IMO, the real issue with these types of plants having ...


10

Both the broccoli stem and the lemon are likely culprits - they probably accentuate each other in a bad way. The lemon (pith) will definitely add a bitter taste on its own - as Spagirl mentioned, the zest and the juice are the non-bitter parts that you would add if you wanted lemon flavor without the bitterness. The broccoli stems are surely not helping ...


57

When a plant arrives in the kitchen, the ecological perspective doesn't matter any more. Any insect present on a plant destined for human consumption is considered a pest by the consuming humans and by the cooks preparing the food for them, no matter what the plant considers it to be (pollinator, parasite, whatever). The average person dislikes consuming ...


5

The reason we use citrus zest and juice is for the sharp, bright tang. The reason we don’t often use the pith, except in applications like marmalade where we want some of the effect, is because of its bitterness. So I’d guess the lemon pith.


2

Mash made with butter (and garlic if you like, or sour cream, mustard, or cheese, etc.) will be rather different made from another starchy veg, and not just in colour. Common mashed veg might be sweet potato, or carrot and swede, and these, whether plain or flavoured, taste very different from mashed potato. The same can be said for chips/fries/wedges: put ...


0

It depends. Some fridges have a special area to store vegetables where they control the air flow and temperature in order to control moisture and humidity. If your fridge is one of these, then removing them from the sealed bags is not a bad idea. However, if you don't have such an area the vegetables are likely to dry or to get cold burns depending on your ...


Top 50 recent answers are included