14

I think what's really happening here is mostly physics, rather than any magical reaction between the meat and the "velvet" (i.e. egg and cornstarch; I'm going to use this term for brevity). The largest effect is that the velvet adds a thin, clingy coating to the outside of the meat. When introduced to heat, that's providing a barrier to the movement of ...


5

Be sure to look at this related question too: How does velveting work? Serious Eats just kind of took this on. They added some nice flavor to the velveting marinade, and then sauced the chunks after cooking. Some kind of adaptation of that concept would probably work well for you. I have done some small experimentation with adding flavors to the egg/...


4

According to MelindaLee.com ... stated by noted chef Ken Hom, that "velveting" is "a technique used to prevent delicate foods from overcooking.... The velvet coat protects the flavor and texture of the food when it is placed into hot oil or water." So, velveting is not exactly a tenderizing method – but it keeps foods from becoming tough. I'm not sure ...


3

Adding other ingredients to the egg/cornstarch mix will make it more likely that the velvet surface will break down. So marinate in advance of velveting. Use Soy sauce in the marinade as osmosis will draw the marinade into the meat in exchange for meat fluids. The velveting that follows will trap the marinade in the meat and give you the double effect you ...


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