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It's a matter of personal preference when referring to restaurants in the United States. Some egg rolls are too large to be easily handled with chopsticks, and they can be eaten using your hands; smaller ones and similar preparations such as spring rolls can too, but you may find it preferable to use chopsticks. When choosing your own egg roll from a common ...


10

My Vietnamese girlfriend uses "hạt điều màu" (annatto). She heats the nuts in oil and then uses the oil without the nuts to fry the meat in.


9

Yes, those bones make a huge difference for flavor. If you just cook meat in water, you won't have anywhere near the rich meatiness that you get from a good bone broth. Sure, you could get similar flavor by deboning the meat, then cooking with the bones and removing them before serving. But that's definitely more work, and in some cases it's pretty much ...


7

UPDATE: OK, I made my version of the sauce twice, I learned a little bit from my first attempt, so I'm going to walk you through my second. Although the ingredients in the stir-fry are vastly different (I had some left over chicken and I have a thing for frozen peas), I think the ingredients and technique I'm demonstrating here will work fine for you as ...


6

A (somewhat south) Vietnamese not currently in Vietnam chiming in ^^ : Apart from some exceptions (like cà phê sữa đá) I have the impression that there are no traditional ice-cold Vietnamese dishes whatsoever (I'd even dare to say that almost all desserts are eaten warm or at least at "room temperature" at 36°C / 96°F). Maybe it's just due to the non-...


6

It's regular roll made with net rice wrapper It's common wrapper in Vietnam. Here's site when you can see the package and rolls made with it bearnakedfood


6

Ốc bông = tiger moon snail (hotdeal.vn, Google images) or in Latin: Notocochlis tigrina (Wikipedia) Ốc tỏi = Japanese bonnet snail (Facebook, Wild Fact Sheets, images, more images) or in Latin: Semicassis bisulcata (Wikipedia). Ốc tỏi is sometimes refered to as "garlic snail" (Hong Hai, Cooky), but this is obviously different from garlic glass snail, which ...


5

Probably Hong Kong. It is written in Chinese as "生菜包", which in Pinyin is "shēngcài bāo", noticeably different to any of its usual spellings in English. However, in Cantonese it is "sang1 choi3 baau1". Much closer to the English spellings and pronunciation. Cantonese is mainly spoken in Hong Kong, a great culinary exporter and major influence on "Chinese ...


4

What's in the picture looks about right. This brand is commonly found in Asian grocery stores around here: (your mileage may vary). It is essentially crystallized cane sugar. If you really can't find it, you could probably substitute regular sugar. The flavour is a little different though, as well it isn't a refined white sugar. According to "this guy" (...


4

I can't give you exact origin of sang choi bow but it is certainly not from Thailand or any of its neighbouring countries. I found an article, the author has Chinese/Cantonese Singapore origin and she said she never taste similar dish back in her home country either. In Australia sang choi bow usually made from minced pork or chicken, stir fried with onion,...


4

Does it look like this? I have some in my pantry now. (Don't tell anyone.) By request, the box contents: inside a cellophane sleeve, 4 foil-wrapped cubes. Here's one: Texture is very much like a boullion cube - hard, with a bit of sticky give when pushed. Salty, as expected, but also sweetish with a distinct flavor of caramelized onions and star anise.


4

A wok is designed to put food in heat at the center and relax some of the heat as you move away from center, and you keeping the food moving in and out of that hot spot so you get an even sear all around. To mimic this, use a wide 12 inch or larger skillet (depending on your quantity of food) with high walls, and make it hot. Continuously flip the food ...


3

You could do it, but you would need to clarify the broth or it would have a somewhat impalpable fatty chew to it. And by clarifying a finished broth, you would alter the taste a bit more than discretely. That does not make it impossible, you will just need to change the order of your stock(s). Start with any fatty components, clarify the broth, add the non-...


3

Like @TFD, this answer isn't directly what you're asking, but I've found that using these techniques has lifted my Pho broth to restaurant quality. Put all of the bones in a roasting pan and cook them at 500 degrees until your fire alarm goes off or the bones crack. Okay, so, just do it for 4-5 hours, and drain the grease every 15 minutes or you really ...


3

This is not the answer you are directly looking for, but may be the trick Some local Phở brewers soak the onion skins in alcohol (rice cooking wine) to extract a stock flavouring (I suspect this is Quercetin?). The resulting dark liquor is added to the broth when the meat is added This certainly kicks up the broth flavour, a bit like MSG does in Chinese ...


3

Laab in Thai language is Verb mean to chop meat. We have Northern Laab and North-eastern Laab which the way to seasoning and taste are difference. From your picture Squid larb is north-eastern style seasoning with dried chili, lime juice, roasted sticky rice, fish sauce, sugar. It's taste is sour come first then salty with a little sweet. It's normally ...


3

Does it's look like this? or This cake is made from mung bean powder and it is bright yellow. Once upon a time, it was wrapped in plant leaves, but today, it is factory-produced and wrapped in foil. The Mung bean cake, or Bánh đậu xanh, tastes very sweet. It is served with tea.


3

Through experimentation, I got the answer. The answer is rice vinegar, a little sugar, a little salt (not so much salt and sugar as to make the vinegar seem like "seasoned rice vinegar" as for sushi, just a pinch of each) and time. After two days in the fridge the sliced fresh jalapenos mellow a bit, but they seem even a little crunchier than when they were ...


3

I think you have actually answered your own question: Some insist that green cardamom should be used in pho, which is also what I myself have been using to cook pho. And later: However, a whole lot of pages point to black cardamom. Not being an expert on Asian cooking (far from it) you may have run across regional differences, or personal ...


2

If they are less hot than jalepeno peppers and more crispy then they probably aren't jalapeno peppers, or at least not standard ones. There are hundreds of pepper varieties and many look very similar but have different heat properties, and different textures. Or they could be jalepenos but grown in cooler conditions or different soil from your typical ...


2

Unprocessed lump sugar is readily available in our area of madison /sun prairie wi. Woodman's, multiple Asian groceries, you may even be able to use Mexican piloncillo. That tastes similar or same, but I think it may be harder?? I wouldn't use brown sugar, sugar in the raw and definitely not white sugar, the yellow rock is smoother, richer and non-cloying. ...


2

Sang Choi Bow was originated from Guangzhou, China. As Sangchoi is lettuce in Chinese, and it pronounced similar like "To get rich" in Chinese.


2

No, it's not unusual at all. See this page from Vietnamese-American cooks for examples where nuoc-mam is used to marinate chicken, or just type nuoc mam marinade in Google :) There are a lot of examples, including fish, chicken, beef, or even mango marinated (as well as dipped, of course) with nuoc-mam (and most of the time lemongrass), and a fair ...


2

Are you asking about Bánh Phở?


2

Thai people we separate sticky rice on a big round tray after steam it to cool down and get rid of steam heat which will make rice is over cook and become too sticky. If you want to cook from rice cooker soak sticky rice over night and in the morning wash it with water 2-3 times then add water about the same level of sticky rice if you add water too much it ...


2

Since we have a canonical answer already, perhaps there might be room for a speculative answer without stepping on toes - that is, if someone is interested as I am in figuring out how the originally described drink might have been...because it sounded interesting. I first thought it might be a Vietnamese equivalent of agua dulce, which is a hot raw-sugar ...


2

I found the restaurant's menu online. Apparently this is Tra Thai. I must have mistaken the flavor. Tra Thai


2

I think a simple answer to your question is yes, one can make the same dish in both a flat bottomed pan on an induction cooker and a wok on a gas flame. I might say that it might be easier in the wok, as it was intended for this style of cooking. I might also add that what makes stir frying different from other types of cooking are essentially two things: ...


2

How long can I safely store Bánh chưng in the fridge? It depends on how good the bánh chưng was wrapped (before cooking) and if the bánh chưng is put into the fridge right after cooking and if the bánh chưng is already cut open. i assume that you have a halfway eaten bánh chưng. I would treat this case like regular cooked rice. A post on cooking.SE says ...


2

I'm not sure how authentic it is, but I was able to find an often repeated dish referred to as Cold Soba Noodles with Vietnamese Pork that is in a way more like mul-naengmyeon than Pho because it's made with buckwheat noodles. Here's the list of ingredients from one example recipe of the Vietnamese dish from Cooking Light on My Recipes: 3 tablespoons ...


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