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46

Normal vinegar concentration (usually around 5% acetic acid) is too acidic to grow mold in the vinegar itself. Mold can sometimes grow on the bottle or on the surface of the vinegar. It isn't dangerous and can be wiped/skimmed off. What you are seeing is called the mother. Vinegar is produce when acetobacter bacteria consume alcohol and produce acetic acid....


27

I wouldn't even try to salvage this. It's not worth it. The two main problems I see are: You don't have enough liquid. There should be enough water and apple juice that apples can drown in it. Even with a lid on, there should be a gauze under or over it. Like in the old pictures of a jar with anything sweet. Because those maggots probably originated ...


24

It's fine as written. Combining vinegar with baking soda (or any acid with any base) is usually done in baking to produce gas, which can lighten the finished product. This is an icing, which is applied after the baking process; it's not set to capture air bubbles, so any effect would be largely temporary and more easily produced through beating. The ...


20

The guideline for the safe canning of tomatoes is for 2 tbsp of 5% vinegar per pint of tomatoes. If you made 16 pints then you'd need 32 tbsp of vinegar, and that is almost 2.5 cups. This isn't to prevent spoiling, the processing will do that, it's to prevent the growth of botulism, which boiling does not do. However, the recipe above calls for 16 cups of ...


16

The answer to this is: No, beer won't substitute, but another vinegar could. The main reason here is flavour - beer tastes completely different to vinegar, and would change the flavour profile of your marinade substantially. This may work out, but it may not, and the only ways to tell would be to test it and/or look for recipes with the same ingredients as ...


14

Vinegar is an acid and acids are not stored in metal, it eats them. Some are less reactive, like stainless steel, but still not a good idea. Normally plastic is fine, that is what vinegar is often marketed in, but glass is usually best as the main container, but lid should either not be metal or should be fully and well coated, and I would tend to avoid ...


12

Great question. First off, the mold. This is nothing to worry about, you should be skimming it off but as far as Vinegar creation it's normal and to be expected. These "worms" have a name :-) Turbatrix Aceti (a.k.a Vinegar Worm) you can read more about them here -> wiki/Turbatrix_aceti Why is that mold there? Well if you think about the fermentation ...


12

As far as I understand it, poaching is poaching (cooking in simmering liquid)...whether it is an egg or a portion of fish. It is the cooking process. I don't think this is debatable. While acid in the poaching liquid helps to denature the proteins and allow the white to more readily stay together, there are other ways to achieve this, by using the "...


11

Welcome to the site @User3176270. I'm not an expert in Halal but my understanding from my halal friends is that red wine vinegar is halal because the process of turning the wine into vinegar gets rid of all the alcohol. In fact, all vinegar is derived from alcohol, the sourness is created by bacteria that eats the alcohol and turns it into acetic acid, so ...


11

From my understanding of your previous questions you have limited space available and are looking at ways to find efficiencies in the kitchen, so maybe you are thinking "can I just have one vinegar for everything?" The answer is yes, as long as you are willing to compromise on flavor. At the end of the day vinegar is just acetic acid at varying strength, ...


10

The used lid had already somewhat degraded when you put vinegar on the jar. These coated self-sealing lids are used in bottling salsa - obviously :) - jams, pickles, condiments, etc all which vary from mild to medium acidity. They work well for the purpose and for the length of time before the contents are used up. But they were never meant for long term ...


10

Other than balsamic vinegar and Chingkiang vinegar, all vinegars are reasonably substitutable for each other. White wine vinegar in particular will substitute well for sherry vinegar. (So will malt vinegar or cider vinegar or whatever you have lying around.)


9

Yes, there is some alcohol in vinegar. Estimates of Ethanol Exposure in Children from Food not Labeled as Alcohol-Containing, Gorgus et al., Journal of Analytical Toxicology 2016 discusses a range of sources of alcohol exposure, some of which might be surprising. Among them is white wine vinegar, which is quoted as having 2.6 g/l. That's around 0.25% ABV (...


8

Cut it with water. Commercial white vinegar is basically nothing but water and acetic acid. 3 units of 5% vinegar and 2 units of plain water give 5 units of 3% vinegar.


7

Know that the traditional Frank's Buffalo Wings Sauce is just Frank's RedHot and melted butter. I'd definitely start there, and tweak with the substitution. The old standard is 1/2 cup (118ml) Frank's RedHot to 1/3 cup (79ml) melted butter. Vinegar is a distinct possibility, to me neither buttermilk nor ketchup make sense. You might find this recipe for ...


7

Not really. Sherry vinegar is made from sherry wine. It is naturally more acidic in flavour. You are better off substituting another vinegar such as white wine, cider or balsamic.


7

All of your example recipes seem to be written from a Western POV. That being the case, all of those recipes seem to be calling for white or light, unseasoned rice vinegar, not Chinkiang AKA Chinese black vinegar. Someone writing a recipe for an American or British audience would not expect you to even know what Chinkiang is, and would ask for it ...


7

While you could certainly use plain white vinegar, there's not all that much difference between that and cider vinegar if "vinegar" is the taste you're objecting to. If you are canning the pickles, changing the recipe could kill you. The vinegar helps to produce an acid environment where botulism does not grow. So, if it turns out you don't like pickles in ...


7

Yes, most varieties of vinegar (all the ones you would use for preservation, at any rate) have an acidic taste, which is imparted to the foods preserved with them. Additionally, if the vinegar has a flavor (e.g. red wine, sherry, ...), it will also affect the taste. It's sort of inevitable, given that vinegar is a diluted acid. You can mitigate this by ...


7

The answer to this depends on the brine in question. Both vinegar and a lactic brine solution are obviously acidic, but vinegar is sold at different concentrations. If you have a lot of leftover lactic brine, you don't know its concentration. So you'd have to take your best guess at that aspect. The main thing however, is taste. Vinegars are generally made ...


6

Yeast eats sugar and makes alcohol, Acetobacters eat alcohol and make acetic acid which is vinegar. Both alcohol and acetic acid inhibit other microbes. Once your solution is alcoholic or acidic enough there is no risk of mold. However- this recipe does not include any yeast or acetobacters, it relies on getting the necessary microbes from the air and the ...


6

The way the recipe reads is: Split open the membrane and dump the egg back in Vinegar & mix well. ("Back" being the operative word there IE, "Dump it back into the vinegar") with the intent of consuming all parts of the egg, including the dissolved shell (the source of calcium), as reflected in the post-script to the recipe: ...Egg Vinegar tonic ...


6

A simple way is to, upon cutting, place your chopped onions into a bowl of ice water for 10-15 minutes before tossing into your salad (sans water, of course). I find this takes the 'spicy bite' and pungency out of them and leaves the crunch - whereas acid seems to affect the texture of the onion.


6

Don't use brass– I believe the vinegar cleans it by dissolving a thin layer from the outside. It looks like the 304 stainless steel tap should work fine. If the rubber seal is the same material that canning (e.g. Weck) jars use, it'll probably be fine. Weck only warns against overheating vinegar solutions, which can cause the seals to become distorted— they ...


6

There are several conversations about this on The Fresh Loaf, which you can search. Issues raised include (a) acetic acid used as a preservative in manufactured bread (lowering the pH), (b) yeast performing best in a neutral to slightly acid environment, suggesting vinegar might be helpful when using instant yeast, (c) vinegar helping the rise in gluten ...


5

Gelatin is pH sensitive. Acidic ingredients can make gelatin become cloudy. Stock is naturally rich in gelatin, so a similar reaction is probably happening in your stock. Acids cause many proteins to coagulate, in some cheeses for instance, so the acid is probably causing the suspended proteins and gelatin in your stock, which are normally not visible, to ...


5

I did an online search for the first 10 sushi rice recipes with distinct ingredient proportions and came up with the following ratio (by weight): 1:0.08:0.16:0.02 (Raw Rice:Sugar:Vinegar:Salt) With cooked rice, 1:0.03:0.06:0.01 (Cooked Rice:Sugar:Vinegar:Salt) Or, if you prefer: For 1300g / ~6 cups Sushi Rice 400g or 2 cups of raw sushi rice (...


5

Sure. It will taste a little different, but fundamentally, the main thing is the acid - you'll just get some extra flavor (which you may or may not consider an improvement) from white wine, cider, red wine, rice, malt or balsamic vinegar, rather than white.


5

Is it mold? It definitely is. Whatever happened to it, it is bad. Are the batch and mother salvageable? I wouldn't think of that for a second. The mold is everywhere. Just get rid of it.


5

It depends; if it's formed a solid disk and was/is floating on top, what you probably have is a vinegar mother, not mold. It's a bacterial colony of acetobacter, and probably happened because your vinegar still had a little bit of alcohol left in it for the bacteria to feed on. You have several options if this is the case: You can leave it in the bottle; ...


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