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10

Other than balsamic vinegar and Chingkiang vinegar, all vinegars are reasonably substitutable for each other. White wine vinegar in particular will substitute well for sherry vinegar. (So will malt vinegar or cider vinegar or whatever you have lying around.)


5

I would go with red wine vinegar, and then white wine vinegar in that order. I am not sure whether red wine vinegar is readily available everywhere though.


5

Heinz started making products in the 1870's and was bottling and selling vinegar in the 1880's, so probably ordinary white vinegar or possibly malt vinegar (depending on recipe) would work well.


4

The best advice anyone can give you is to please stop experimenting and use tested recipes. Particularly for acidified pickles, there are huge numbers of resources out there with tested recipes verified by scientific protocols. (That is, they tried them many times under many conditions and tested stored versions for microorganism growth to verify they are ...


3

Julia Child's "classic" recipe for beurre blanc uses quite a lot of butter (3 sticks) to 1/4 cup each of white wine and white wine vinegar (plus shallot and salt and pepper, with a squeeze of lemon to finish). I suspect that you (a) used too much liquid, and (b) used the wrong vinegar, leading to an overly sour/acetic sauce.


3

Assuming that you were using the vinegar/water mix to clean the microwave... No, it is unlikely that you have damaged the microwave with vinegar - unless you have pure or glacial acetic acid, you are using vinegar with between 4% and 8% acetic acid, the rest is mostly water. This is not typically very damaging to metallic surfaces unless left on for ...


2

Usually, pickles are classified as "vinegar pickles" or "lacto-fermented" pickles. Vinegar pickles, unless canned in a hot water bath or pressure canner, are typically for short term consumption, and stored in the refrigerator. I would say less than a week. Lacto-fermented pickles go through a fermentation process that makes them edible for a much longer ...


2

You may be able to save the dish by adding some bitterness and sweetness to counteract the acidity. Spinach, Kale and other bitter vegetables would work, as would bitter herbs like fenugreek. Sweetness could be sugar, honey, any sweetener to be honest. There's limits to this approach, you may end up with something that is overwhelmingly sour, bitter and ...


1

You can try placing the jar in hot water or use warm running tap water to heat up and re-liquefy the vinegar. When I have honey that has crystalized and I want it in liquid form, I heat water in a pot, take the pot off the burner, and place the (glass) honey jar in the pot until it is the correct consistency.


1

I would use some good regular (i.e., a non-reduced or a non-aged) balsamic vinegar to thin it out.


1

In general to make yogurt you need 4 things - milk, a culture, temperature and time. You can obtain a culture from any live-culture yogurt you can get from the supermarket. Look for ones that specifically say "live culture". The others will still contain the bacterial species you might find in yogurt, but have been pasteurized to improve shelf life. For ...


1

It's a good idea, and pretty common. That's the basis of Filipino adobo, as well as various other Filipino dishes. Meat is marinated in a vinegary mixture and then braised in that mixture. Braising in the vinegar mixture is much more effective than just marinating would be. While I've never had game bird adobo, it sounds quite tasty.


1

Probably the turkey legs are frozen right now. Why don't you experiment on some turkey legs from the store? Probably acid would be good to help break down tough cuts. I have not heard of stewing in vinegar but definitely stewing in wine. I stew in V8 juice pretty often. If vinegar is what you dig, try stewing some regular turkey legs, with an onion, ...


1

As stated, the details of your dish will make a difference. If there are elements in your dish which have absorbed the vinegar there may not be a great deal you can do. If, however, the dish is more of a stew or soup where things are sitting in the liquid, you might try straining off the existing stock/vinegar liquor and replacing with fresh. Given that ...


1

I find rhubarb juice home made is fabulous in oil and “ vinegar” salad dressing. I can’t eat vinegar or alcohol or citrus. Didn’t know about ascorbic acid. Rhubarb juice rocks it and there is a lovely pink color


1

When I was growing up in the 70’s, mom and grandma only had one kind of vinegar they cooked with, which was red wine vinegar. That was “vinegar” back in the dark days before new flavors from around the world started easing into our pantries. My guess, if it’s a recipe out of a family cookbook in the northeastern or Midwest US, that’s what they are talking ...


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