9

Thanks to rumtscho for pointing me in the right direction, I came up with a formula that'll accomplish the math described by rumtscho and cranbo on thefreshloaf.com: targetPercentProtein = (flourPercentProtein * x) + (vitalGlutenPercentProtein * y) (100 - targetPercentProtein) = ((100 - flourPercentProtein) * x) + ((100 - ...


9

Yes, and it is very easy. I do it all the time. You only need a very simple calculation. You don't even have to be precise. If you do want precision, you will have to find out 1) how much of your flour protein is gluten, 2) how much of your "vital wheat gluten" is gluten, and 3) how much gluten content you need for your recipe. Then use a simple rule-of-...


7

These are two related, but different products. Gluten is protein that is formed from two pre-cursor proteins, glutanin and gliaden, found in wheat flour in the presence of water and under enzymatic activity. It forms resilient stretchable networks which give yeast raised bread its structure. Whole wheat flour is... well... whole wheat berries, ground up. ...


7

The primary reason coconut flour recipes (especially a high hydration recipe like pancakes) end up tasting like eggs is because they are primarily eggs with very little flour. Coconut flour is extremely absorbent, which means two things: For the same amount of liquid, you need less coconut flour compared to other flours like flaxseed meal, almond flour, ...


7

"High" gluten flour has, at most 15% gluten. "Indian" white flour, or maida has 7.5%. If you manage to pull it off, you basically end up with what's essentially a pan fried slab of mock meat, rather than a bread - basically seitan. You typically add gluten to flour to modify its characteristics - the only way you're going to be able to make naan that ...


6

No, there is no substitute for gluten, at all. The gluten + soft flour combination is itself a substitute for bread flour, so if you can get bread flour, as Catija suggested, use it. If you can't, you need another recipe. Especially if your goal is to "not make it complicated", don't use substitutes. Substitutes are always complicated. The easy thing is to ...


6

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of heat....


6

Cheesecloth, canvas, broadcloth, or duck would all work well.


5

The rubbery texture can be from over-kneading when combining the burgers. For some recipes, I have pre-baked at a low temperature then grilled to get the right texture on the outside. This would work with a recipe with a resting period as well as one that just dries. Also, if the egg replacer is not binding correctly (I am assuming you are using Ener-G), ...


4

I don't measure flour by the cup anymore - too many cooking shows and online forums have changed that method. I weigh my flour on a reasonably priced dial kitchen scale, because measuring by the cup is so dependent on how packed the flour is in the cup. A cup of flour is generally 125 grams (500 grams, or 4 cups of flour is an almost standard recipe ...


4

No, I don't believe vital wheat gluten will work in this way for your recipe. When hydrated, vital wheat gluten is very sticky, and you can't roll or flatten it out very easily like you would need for naan -- and I'm not even sure it would cook and rise the same way as regular flour. There are gluten-free all-purpose flour that are made for baking. I would ...


3

You can make Seitan from wheat flour by forming it into a dough, then rinsing away the starch. Making it from vital wheat gluten is faster, but wheat flour is a more common staple and you might feel better about making it from this raw ingredient. Check out this link: http://forkableblog.com/?p=28 "The main objective when making seitan from whole wheat ...


3

I've never found wheat gluten flour that was higher than 80% gluten which is what I use, adding some when I make bread with rye flour. But if you can't eat wheat due to high fructans content, would you still be able to digest the fructan in the other 20%? You wouldnt be adding much gluten flour so the small amount of fructans might be okay. Rather than ...


3

Gliadens CAN be separated from Glutenins. One method is by ethanol. Also, Gliadens are not a precursor to Glutenins. They are different types. Gliadens are momomers and are soluble in 50 % ethanol. Glutenins are polymers, are insoluble in ethanol and are of a high molecular weight. In water, Gliadens present as a honey-like viscous fuid whereas glutenins ...


3

I have been experimenting with this very thing, which is how I stumbled on this conversation. Real meat (I'm not a vegetarian so I can easily compare) has a different mouth feel. Deli meat feels stretchy and fatty, which seitan never does. It's just stretchy. Adding oil to the mix just seems to make the seitan more brittle. My best luck so far is using the ...


3

Some Asian stores do carry it as it is used to make seitan. However, there isn't a blanket yes or no answer as it is up to the individual stores. The only thing you can do is to check the stores you can get to. It may also be called gluten flour but, if you see this, be sure to read the label to ensure that it has 75% or more protein.


3

I use 1 tsp wheat gluton per 1 cup of all purpose flour, for my white breads and sweet doughs. In whole wheat bread I use 2 tsp per cup of wheat or rye flour, Sure does make things raise nicely.


3

Without knowing what specific recipe you're starting from, it's hard for me to say exactly. However, there are definitely recipes out there that call for olive oil as an ingredient in seitan (for example: Viva Vegan by Terry Hope Romero, pg. 35). You could try increasing that amount to see what happens, possibly decreasing the broth to keep the same amount ...


3

If the problem is that they're raw in the middle, try lowering the heat and covering the pan. In beef burgers and sausages, the lid helps them steam a little, getting the center done faster; you then uncover and raise the heat to get a good sear on the outside. I don't know any reason why this wouldn't work for vegatarian burgers.


3

Tea towels are traditionally made out of linen. It has a delicate weave that is ideal for drying delicate china without the risk of "scratching." A linen napkin although less delicate will most likely still be a very good substitute for the purpose of wrapping the vital wheat gluten loaf. However, most cloths that have a simple weave without the "loop" ...


3

Vital wheat gluten will not dissolve as those two isolates will. Vital what gluten would likelier clot. Here its a description of the difference between soy flour and soy protein isolate; although VWG is basically a protein isolate (it is the leftover from washing away the starch in wheat), like those powders, the other two are gluten free. However, like ...


3

You couldn't use only vital wheat gluten, as that would produce a rubbery mass, that would be too elastic to stretch out to a flat shape (and stay there). Though it can still be tasty, it wouldn't really resemble naan or any other flatbread. While I don't have an exact naan recipe, I do have a pizza recipe — which uses a large portion of Vital Wheat Gluten ...


2

I don't own tea towels either. So I generally use extremely clean white t- shirts. They work for proofing dough and wrapping swiss roll cakes.


2

Check out this web page that does the math for you! http://flourmath.bradfordrobertson.com I set this page up because I got tired of taking the time to reference the formulas and figure it out each time. Now I just go to this page, plug in my numbers and target gluten goal, and it gives me the recipe for the flour I want. Hope this helps others as much as ...


2

I've been wondering this too. I wanted a texture more like sausage, with little pieces of fat. I've added finely-chopped onions that I'd caramelized in oil, and crushed up pieces of pine nuts. Both are delicious. The texture is still not exactly like sausage but it's closer, and the onions and pine nuts add extra flavor.


2

Here's a crazy idea. Freeze a few cubes of Earth Balance or other vegan butter, and blend the gluten flour and cold fat together in a food processor like you were making biscuits. You could also grate the frozen fat and mix it into the flour, being careful not to melt it with your hands. Steaming or simmering the seitan would likely cause most of the melted ...


2

I don't think that will work well but I can't explain why. I do think egg whites or possibly gelatin would work better. Neither has much flavor, and both have similar consistency. Coconut flour needs LOTS of moisture as well as binding properties. You might try half whole eggs and half egg whites OR half whole eggs and half softened gelatin by volume.


2

Try this recipe⁠—I’ve played around and this works the best. Makes about 5 naans: 1/4 cup coconut flour 1 cup vital wheat gluten 2 Tbsp psyllium (or 1 tsp xanthan gum) 1 tsp baking powder pinch salt 1 Tbsp oil/ghee 1 cup warm water


1

Gluten will give you a bread-like texture; while it is a protein with a lot of binding power it doesn't "stick" to much else than itself once it is developed. This is evident from what happens when you bake a basic bread (no eggs or egg alternatives) vs a cake. Legume flours - like chickpea flour (indian besan), soybean flour, lentil flours - are easy to ...


1

Try Xanthan Gum, but you will need to play with the quantity. 1/2 to 1 tsp should be good, depending on how thick you like your pizza crust. My friend has Celiac, and I find this works well in place of Vital Wheat Gluten.


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